Linux and DVD-ROM drives?

Linux and DVD-ROM drives?

Post by Joel Hard » Tue, 16 Sep 1997 04:00:00



Is there any work being done to be able to access the MPEG streams and whatever
else is on a DVD disk through Linux?  Also, I've seen a few places (e.g.
Walnut Creek) offering DVD-ROM disks, do they just use the iso9660 filesystem,
or is it something else?

--

http://www.inficad.com/~deeng -- Linux, x86 asm, C/C++, and other stuff
Freedows Driver Development Team Lead (http://freedows.home.ml.org)
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Linux and DVD-ROM drives?

Post by Andrew E. Milesk » Thu, 18 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:>Is there any work being done to be able to access the MPEG streams and whatever
>else is on a DVD disk through Linux?  Also, I've seen a few places (e.g.
>Walnut Creek) offering DVD-ROM disks, do they just use the iso9660 filesystem,
>or is it something else?

DVD uses OSTA-UDF(tm) = Optical Storage Technologly Association -
Universal Disk Format. It is based on ISO 13346, a superset of
ISO 9660.

I'm in the process of writing Linux UDF support.

--
Andrew E. Mileski
Linux UDF Developer

 
 
 

Linux and DVD-ROM drives?

Post by Roger Boo » Fri, 19 Sep 1997 04:00:00



: >Is there any work being done to be able to access the MPEG streams and whatever
: >else is on a DVD disk through Linux?  Also, I've seen a few places (e.g.
: >Walnut Creek) offering DVD-ROM disks, do they just use the iso9660 filesystem,
: >or is it something else?

: DVD uses OSTA-UDF(tm) = Optical Storage Technologly Association -
: Universal Disk Format. It is based on ISO 13346, a superset of
: ISO 9660.

: I'm in the process of writing Linux UDF support.

Can you mount 'normal' CD-ROM's in a DVD under Linux now?  I'm rebuilding
my system and need to replace my 1X CD-ROM, I was considering going
with a DVD and a writer and skipping a normal CD-ROM drive entirely.

Roger
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Linux and DVD-ROM drives?

Post by Joel Har » Fri, 19 Sep 1997 04:00:00



Quote:>>Is there any work being done to be able to access the MPEG streams and whatever
>>else is on a DVD disk through Linux?  Also, I've seen a few places (e.g.
>>Walnut Creek) offering DVD-ROM disks, do they just use the iso9660 filesystem,
>>or is it something else?

>DVD uses OSTA-UDF(tm) = Optical Storage Technologly Association -
>Universal Disk Format. It is based on ISO 13346, a superset of
>ISO 9660.

>I'm in the process of writing Linux UDF support.

Cool.  How about movie support?  I've heard this'd be hard since they'll be
encrypted based on geographical locaiton, but that sounds a little strange
to me.  Also, somebody followed up saying that DVD-ROM drives can't read
normal CDs.  Is that true?  If so, I don't think I'll bother with DVD for a
while.

--

http://www.inficad.com/~deeng -- Linux, x86 asm, C/C++, and other stuff
Freedows Driver Development Team Lead (http://freedows.home.ml.org)
Descent 3 for Linux!  Vote at http://www.interplay.com/descent/ideas

 
 
 

Linux and DVD-ROM drives?

Post by Craig Armou » Sat, 20 Sep 1997 04:00:00


Quote:> Can you mount 'normal' CD-ROM's in a DVD under Linux now?  I'm rebuilding
> my system and need to replace my 1X CD-ROM, I was considering going
> with a DVD and a writer and skipping a normal CD-ROM drive entirely.

I'm pretty sure that most DVD drives on the market at the moment don't
read normal CD's.  They use a different method of reading!! Don't hold
me to it though 'cause I havn't bothered to keep up with all the info!!
--
Craig Armour:  Student!!                  The University Of Queensland

 
 
 

Linux and DVD-ROM drives?

Post by Mark Hea » Sat, 20 Sep 1997 04:00:00



: DVD uses OSTA-UDF(tm) = Optical Storage Technologly Association -
: Universal Disk Format. It is based on ISO 13346, a superset of
: ISO 9660.

: I'm in the process of writing Linux UDF support.

Someone else posted here a couple of weeks back with a description of his
DVD experience under linux.  

Because the file system didn't exist,  all he could do was cat the raw
device,  and with a movie disk he could only read the first 640k (or
something) the rest of the disk gave read errors.  

Are they doing something stupid like the different mode CDs, with DVDs?

--
-- mark heath - Netspace Online Systems.  http://www.netspace.net.au/
Obnoxious Usenet Habits #9. Ask readers of rec.music.misc to post their
favorite Zeppelin tune "for a poll".
:wq

 
 
 

Linux and DVD-ROM drives?

Post by Mark Hea » Sat, 20 Sep 1997 04:00:00


: normal CDs.  Is that true?  If so, I don't think I'll bother with DVD for a
: while.

No this isn't true.  There were claims that CD-Rs couldn't be read.  But
according to the Creative Encore DVD Properganda they can read CD-Rs.

Perhaps the really early DVDs cant read CD-Rs.

--
-- mark heath - Netspace Online Systems.  http://www.netspace.net.au/
Obnoxious Usenet Habits #7. Post a 56-part binary MPG file of your dog
throwing up to news.answers. Announce that you screwed it up and repeat.
:wq

 
 
 

Linux and DVD-ROM drives?

Post by Jean Lidd » Sat, 20 Sep 1997 04:00:00




Quote:

> Cool.  How about movie support?  I've heard this'd be hard since they'll be
> encrypted based on geographical locaiton, but that sounds a little strange
> to me.  Also, somebody followed up saying that DVD-ROM drives can't read
> normal CDs.  Is that true?  If so, I don't think I'll bother with DVD for a
> while.

There's a web page with the DVD spec online (sorry I don't have the
URL handy), and I must say I agree with you.  My reasons for waiting
on DVD include some of the ones you mentioned, as well as
the impending HDTV standard, which is unmentioned in the current spec
as far as I could tell, and will certainly muddy the DVD waters even
further.

The DVD video/audio standard is in some ways really horrible.
The recording industry has put in all kinds of copy-protection/
encryption/crippling stuff, including locks based on geographic
region, of all the asinine things!  It would be great if
there were a DVD-Video -> mpeg2 and DVD-audio -> WAV conversion
utility, so that those of us who object to having our
technology crippled by these people could store our video and audio
in an "unfettered" digital format.  I would much prefer having to
use my computer to play back movies and audio from a DVD-Data disk
with a Windoze or ext2 filesystem on it rather than live with the
limitations the recording industry is trying to shove down our
throats.  If mpeg2 and wav are not ideal for this, perhaps something
like "raw dvd video" and "raw dvd audio" a la *.cdr files for CD's
would be better.  Anything, as long as it permits me to use my
equipment and my media as I see fit, unfettered.

And for the record, no, I do not have a habit pirate videos or music,
or software for that matter, but I do make copies on other media for
listening on my walkman, at work, etc.  I keep my CD collection
on my hard drive in mp3 format as a convenience -- it's great to have 30
hours of random-playing favorites going at a party, rather than
having to pick out a CD to play every 40 to 70 minutes.  Like having a
radio station that only plays music I like, with no commercials and no
DJs.  My point? That the recording industry has no right to assume
that our intentions are dishonest merely because we want to move
the music or video we paid good money for from one medium to another.  
Anything we can do to thwart their efforts at crippling our technology
is IMHO a very good thing.

Just my 2 cents worth ...

jean.
====== Copyright (c) 1997 by Jean Liddle; All rights reserved. ======
Jean Liddle                   | DISCLAIMER:  "It is unlikely that

http://www.jean-michel.com/   | here, much less my employer."
------------------------------+---------------------------------------
When you go out strolling through the world you do not have the "right
not to be offended" by the values and cultures of other
peoples/countries/religions.   --internet user, condemning the CDA

 
 
 

Linux and DVD-ROM drives?

Post by Shankar Unn » Tue, 23 Sep 1997 04:00:00



> The DVD video/audio standard is in some ways really horrible.
> The recording industry has put in all kinds of copy-protection/
> encryption/crippling stuff, including locks based on geographic
> region, of all the asinine things!

There's a real (and maybe even good) reason for this.

American audiences may be willing to pay $19.95 for a DVD movie, but a
similar purchaser in, say, India, may not be able to afford anything
close to this amount. Hollywood would like to price their product in
third world markets to maximize their total take, and the resultant
price may be way low by American or Western European standards. Given
the relative incomes, the optimum price varies widely from country to
country.

If American DVD players could read Chinese disks, there's an obvious
arbitrage market of buying up Chinese disks and shipping them to the US.
The per-country encryption scheme at least puts a spoke in this wheel by
severely restricting the *legal* ways you can arbitrage this difference

There's always piracy - you only need to buy one American disk, ship it
to Taiwan, read the raw bits, and stamp out thousands of pirated copies,
but I guess the theory is that at least you've limited the *legal* ways
you can "rob Hollywood of their profits".

Quote:> It would be great if there were a DVD-Video -> mpeg2 and
> DVD-audio -> WAV conversion utility, so that those of us who
> object to having our technology crippled by these people could
> store our video and audio in an "unfettered" digital format.  

No one's stopping you from doing that today, you know.. I believe it's
possible to not encrypt a movie if you wish and still play it in
conventional DVD players - in fact, while the encryption standard was
being developed, sample disks were being created unencrypted. You might
want to do this if you're creating, say, an informational movie for
non-profit distribution..

Anyway, the only difference between "Chinese" encryption and "American"
encryption is the key. The algorithm is the same - you either use it or
you don't. If you do use it, you get a country-specific public key from
the DVD consortium.

And yeah, there's the even simpler way of just creating a filesystem
with a single MPEG file, and just mounting the filesystem and using
mpegplay to play it. You won't be able to plop it into a DVD player, but
you can always play it back on a PC. The encryption in DVD movies is
simply a layer on top of (or actually, intertwined with) conventional
MPEG-2 and Dolby AC-3.

--
Shankar Unni                       Powertel Global, Inc.


 
 
 

1. Linux x DVD-ROM drive?

     Hi there,

     I'd like to know if I can use a DVD-ROM drive under Linux to read
CD's (I really don't mind not being able to read DVD's, but I need the
CD's).

     This doubt is one of the things pushing me away from a DVD drive at
the moment... if it can work as a standard CD-ROM under Linux, it's
great.

     Thanks for any info, Marcelo.

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