choosing distributions (and package installers)

choosing distributions (and package installers)

Post by Christopher Brown » Sun, 10 Feb 2002 02:29:48




Quote:> Please read about the LSB.  It would do you well to first understand
> something you are arguing about, and the direction it's leading for
> Linux distributions abroad.

The really _hilarious_ part about LSB is that, at least in the latest
iteration, it no longer forcibly has the slightest bit to do with that
operating system by the guy with a funny name from Finland.

Pointedly, the standards in LSB have nothing to with any particular OS
kernel.  They assortedly reference:
  - POSIX standards
  - ANSI standards
  - IEEE standards
  - ISO standards
  - Open Group standards

Many of which are the basis for _implementing_ an OS kernel, but none
of which are forcibly derived from the one purported to be what the
standard is about.

In effect, it's sort of like NCR.  At one time, NCR stood for
"National Cash Register."  Today, it doesn't.  It stands for "NCR,"
and attempts to claim any forcible relationship between NCR and cash
registers or anything particularly "national" would be exceedingly
silly.

In much the same way, claiming that LSB has any more or less
affiliation with Solaris than it does with FreeBSD, both of which are
systems that will likely be able to conform to the standard, despite
not starting with the letter "L", is very silly.

I see the _main_ impact of LSB being that vendors like Caldera, Sun,
HP, IBM (and perhaps QNX Systems, WindRiver, BSDMall, and perhaps,
being the _vastly_ entertaining option, _Microsoft_) should be able to
claim that their assorted OSes (that pointedly do not contain the
letter "L") conform to LSB and can be used as platforms to that end.

Note that in all of the above, I never mentioned the name of the
kernel that perhaps once had something to do with the intent of LSB,
but clearly, by the specs, is quite irrelevant to LSB.
--

http://www.ntlug.org/~cbbrowne/emacs.html
"Please, Captain.  Not in front of the Klingons."
-- Leonard Nimoy as Spock in Star Trek V, The Final Frontier

 
 
 

choosing distributions (and package installers)

Post by yt.. » Sun, 10 Feb 2002 03:13:45




>> Please read about the LSB.  It would do you well to first understand
>> something you are arguing about, and the direction it's leading for
>> Linux distributions abroad.
> The really _hilarious_ part about LSB is that, at least in the latest
> iteration, it no longer forcibly has the slightest bit to do with that
> operating system by the guy with a funny name from Finland.
> Pointedly, the standards in LSB have nothing to with any particular OS
> kernel.  They assortedly reference:
>  - POSIX standards
>  - ANSI standards
>  - IEEE standards
>  - ISO standards
>  - Open Group standards
> Many of which are the basis for _implementing_ an OS kernel, but none
> of which are forcibly derived from the one purported to be what the
> standard is about.
> In effect, it's sort of like NCR.  At one time, NCR stood for
> "National Cash Register."  Today, it doesn't.  It stands for "NCR,"
> and attempts to claim any forcible relationship between NCR and cash
> registers or anything particularly "national" would be exceedingly
> silly.
> In much the same way, claiming that LSB has any more or less
> affiliation with Solaris than it does with FreeBSD, both of which are
> systems that will likely be able to conform to the standard, despite
> not starting with the letter "L", is very silly.

Solaris already complies with Open Group standards, which include POSIX,
ANSI, IEEE, and ISO already.

-----.

--
Theres a hole in the world like a great black pit and
its filled with people who are filled with shit and the
vermin of the world inhabit it

 
 
 

1. choosing distributions (and package installers)

Hi all.  I'm about to choose a linux distribution and have some
questions.  I guess I can say that I'm a newbie, because despite
having used linux since 1993 I've managed to remain pretty ignorant
about it.  I've installed Red Hat about 5 times and used it as a web
server, but haven't spent much time with it (none in 2 years).  I
_have_ spent alot of time with Solaris and Irix, but mainly as a
software developer - I am not a sysadmin and tend to avoid such tasks.
 So I need your help.

1.  It seemed to me that Red Hat has a non-standard directory setup
compared to the Unixes I'm used to.  I had trouble finding some
config/init files and such.  Do other people feel this?  Is this true
of all the distros, or just RedHat?  Any ideas on which would be more
similar to the above unixes?  I did like the ease with which Redhat
installed...

2.  I had similar problems with RPM.  For example, the last time I
installed RedHat (5.2? or maybe 6.2?) I also installed the Apache RPM.
 Then I tried to install some modules to ssl-enable Apache and it was
a nightmare - like the Apache code had been installed in 5 different
places, and it was a hassle to find anything, such as the config files
that I needed to modify, I had to keep doing "find" from /, and the
Apache/SSL step-by-step instructions were no longer valid because they
were assuming that everything was where it would be if I had installed
Apache from a tar file.  I ended up hand-deleting everything I could
find from the existing Apache RPM install, reinstalling from a tar,
and then was able to get everything to work.  I had some similar
problems with a java RPM that I later wanted to replace with the new
Sun JDK.  So my vague question here, is: why was this install style
chosen, if anyone knows?  Do other distros have a different style?  Do
some of you use RedHat but always install things only from tars?  Or
is this actually a neat system that I will see the patterns and
benefits of if I keep using it?

I'm wondering if I should use RedHat again, or something else.  I'm
hoping to become a much more serious user this time.  I fear that I
haven't expressed my questions very clearly, but hope some of you will
know what I mean anyway and have answers/suggestions.  If I need a
good flaming to burn away my ignorance, please go for it :)

thanks
j

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