Sorry, but any ideas fo a final-year uni project?

Sorry, but any ideas fo a final-year uni project?

Post by Mar » Tue, 08 Jul 2003 06:23:22



Hi all,

I'm going to go into the final year of my Computer Networks &
Communications degree and need to come up with an idea for my
final-year project. Any suggestions or ideas will be gratefully
received.
I'm interested in Sun hardware and the Solaris OS and I've been
working with a lot of Sun gear as a sysadmin for my intern year. At
the moment I'm kind of thinking about producinga tool which reads the
tarred-up data output from running the explorer (SUNWexplo) package.
It's basically a package which collects a whole mass of diagnostic
data about a server and sends it to the engineers who can use it to
diagnose any problems the server had.
Another half-idea is to produce a tool which can map out an entire
network and then illustrate the state of the network on the screen
(i.e. hostnames, ping times, IP addresses etc). Trouble is, I'm pretty
sure this idea's been done a million times before and a million times
better.
A friend recommended I look at maybe investigating forensic databases
- I think the idea is basically that the database records every
relevant action that takes place on a server, like the logs, so that
it may be used reliably in any possible investigation. This opens up a
whole loads of issues like ensuring the database is 100% secure and
tamperproof.
Ideally I would like to do a project that does involve the
investigation of networks in some way, but I'm open to anything, and I
also would consider myself able to pick things up pretty easily after
a good bit of reading around the subject. I'm planning on learning a
lot of java and maybe php in the next year too.

TIA

Cheers

Mark

 
 
 

Sorry, but any ideas fo a final-year uni project?

Post by Doug Freyburg » Wed, 09 Jul 2003 00:50:10



> I'm going to go into the final year of my Computer Networks &
> Communications degree and need to come up with an idea for my
> final-year project. Any suggestions or ideas will be gratefully
> received.

Do something usefull, needed, and not publicly available.

Read DNS plus NIS plus NIS+ plus hosts and build a database of
all known hosts.  Compare with previous to map additions and
subtractions.  Ping all known and previously known machines and
preport removed ones that still ping and new ones that don't.

The read the NIS or local netmasks and build a table of all
"local" IP numbers according the the IP population above.  Have
some sort of exclude list in case folks add in remote machines.
If you have properly configued DNS reverse tables, use those.

Then scan for hosts that aren't in the tables.  Send an e-mail
to report them.  Arrange with the firewall folks so they expect
you to do ping scans.

Then read the NetBackup client configurations.  Automagically add
new hosts into the default backup cycle.  Automagically remove
decommissioned hosts from the backup cycle.

Hmmm, a backup system that doesn't have a client module to install
would be even better than NetBackup.  Anyways, pick the backup
system that you site uses and autogenerate for it.

Autodiscovery and autobackup rules.  I've done the above for sites
that use NIS, but not for sites that use DNS.

 
 
 

Sorry, but any ideas fo a final-year uni project?

Post by Len Philp » Wed, 09 Jul 2003 09:48:41



Quote:> Hi all,

> I'm going to go into the final year of my Computer Networks &
> Communications degree and need to come up with an idea for my
> final-year project. Any suggestions or ideas will be gratefully
> received.
> I'm interested in Sun hardware and the Solaris OS and I've been
> working with a lot of Sun gear as a sysadmin for my intern year. At
> the moment I'm kind of thinking about producinga tool which reads the
> tarred-up data output from running the explorer (SUNWexplo) package.
> It's basically a package which collects a whole mass of diagnostic
> data about a server and sends it to the engineers who can use it to
> diagnose any problems the server had.

Here's a variation on that : Write a tool that will extract all the
recommended patches from a given host's Sentinel Report, recursively
including all their prereqs, and then work out the dependency order.
From that, generate a script of some sort (Expect, ftp, whatever) that
when run, will download all the patches and construct a cluster.

Some nice enhancements to the above would be :

* Option to include (or not) the "complete fix" patches

* Option to include/exclude patches of a given category, i.e., security,
  X11, networking, etc., etc.

* Capability to compare a number of such patch groupings, build a common
  cluster from those patches common to all systems and then construct
  just diff clusters for each host.

* What else?

It's important to build the script (or response list, or whatever) ahead
of time instead of just downloading the patches on the fly. The reason
is that with a number of systems to patch, downloading the individual
patches might take some time. If a patch is obsoleted or superceded
during that time, your clusters for each system wouldn't stay in version
sync if you're just downloading patches based on the patch number only.
With a predefined list (including versions), at least you'd know that
when you went to get them.

Such a tool doesn't exist at Sun, at least not with all those
capabilities. There's PatchTool, patchcheck, patchdiag, etc., etc., but
none offer the Big Three : 1) Build the list, 2) Find dependencies & 3)
work out the application order. There would be some work to determine
the best way to interface with SunSolve, etc., but it would be great if
it could be done.

Such a tool would be gladly accepted at Sun sites where many systems are
to be patched on a regular basis.

--

-- Len Philpot                          ><>  --


 
 
 

Sorry, but any ideas fo a final-year uni project?

Post by Ronny Marti » Fri, 11 Jul 2003 18:13:59


Quote:> I'm interested in Sun hardware and the Solaris OS and I've been
> working with a lot of Sun gear as a sysadmin for my intern year. At
> the moment I'm kind of thinking about producinga tool which reads the
> tarred-up data output from running the explorer (SUNWexplo) package.
> It's basically a package which collects a whole mass of diagnostic
> data about a server and sends it to the engineers who can use it to
> diagnose any problems the server had.

I think many will be interested in a tool like this.
At the moment all our explo mails are automatically send to a central server
and unpacked (procmail) but searching is done with common unix tools (find
and grep). The basic interface is a quick and dirty web frontend for find
with a grep option :) Takes ages but it works...
One ideal function would be to track changes.
 
 
 

Sorry, but any ideas fo a final-year uni project?

Post by Sam » Fri, 11 Jul 2003 21:42:29


On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 11:13:59 +0200, Ronny Martin


>> I'm interested in Sun hardware and the Solaris OS and I've been
>> working with a lot of Sun gear as a sysadmin for my intern year. At
>> the moment I'm kind of thinking about producinga tool which reads the
>> tarred-up data output from running the explorer (SUNWexplo) package.
>> It's basically a package which collects a whole mass of diagnostic
>> data about a server and sends it to the engineers who can use it to
>> diagnose any problems the server had.

> I think many will be interested in a tool like this.
> At the moment all our explo mails are automatically send to a central
> server
> and unpacked (procmail) but searching is done with common unix tools
> (find
> and grep). The basic interface is a quick and dirty web frontend for find
> with a grep option :) Takes ages but it works...
> One ideal function would be to track changes.

Sun already have a tool to do something like this, called Sentinel.It's not
publically available, but if you request a report (and have a current
support contract with Sun) they are usually happy to help.

cheers

Sam N

 
 
 

Sorry, but any ideas fo a final-year uni project?

Post by Dr. David Kirkb » Fri, 11 Jul 2003 22:57:48


Sorry your post has expired from my news server, so I don't know your
original question, so are going on the subject title.

How about a comparision of the many ways of getting better peformance
from multiple processing. There are good physical reasons you can't
just get better and better peformance from one cpu, so ultimiately
high-performance machines are going to have to use more than once
processing element. You might consider:

a) Multi-threaded prorgram, running multiple threads on different
cpus.
b) The approach of 'setiathome'
c) I once got involved in someone efforts to solve chess moves, but he
organised that badly, sending me the same data files more than once,
forgot to take into account I had multiple cpus .... etc. I gave up
with that.
c) OpenMP
d) MPICH.
e) Compilers that can automatically parallelise (ignore spelling) bits
of your program.
f) Intel's Hyperthreading.
g) and severl more.

You could consider peformance, ease of programming ...

That could easily make a PhD project, so you would need to be careful
to limit yourself to a small subset of all the possibilities.

Good luck.

PS, you could add in your dissertation you took suggestions from a
newsgroup. It shows initiative - something I look for when marking
undergrad/postgrad projects.

--
Dr. David Kirkby,
Senior Research Fellow,
Department of Medical Physics,
University College London,
11-20 Capper St, London, WC1E 6JA.
Tel: 020 7679 6408 Fax: 020 7679 6269
Internal telephone: ext 46408

 
 
 

Sorry, but any ideas fo a final-year uni project?

Post by Mar » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 23:57:51


Hi everyone,

I'd just like to say a big thanks to everyone who took the time to
post a suggestion and it's definitely given me a few more ideas I
could pursue. I most like the patch tool idea, but after looking into
it I believe Sun have released a very similar application called Patch
Management System which is a module for the Sun Management Center. I
haven't had the time to look into it in too much detail but I
certainly will at some point in the future.

Once again, many thanks!

Cheers

Mark

 
 
 

1. Frame-relay over serial - (Network Perforamnce Final Year Univ Project).

My final year university project is coming around, and on my work
placement, I am working with Cisco (ATM-Framerelay internetworking with
MLPPP - FRF.8 gateways not FRF 8.1, hence using MLPPP rather than
FRF.12). Trying to use this as a final year project (struggling to make
enough of it my OWN work rather than the companies IPR- think the
company with the patent on the hyperlink!).

I have frame-relay in my mind only because that's what I've been working
with.... I'd work with Cisco-kit if it wasn't bug ridden and proprietary
IOS's--- this is where Linux comes in. I pretty much know frame-relay
frames and Multilink/PPP frames inside out.

Initially I'm looking for resources on having two network channels in
the linux box, (like. Cisco Low Latency Queueing), so that priority
traffic can be sent down one link, and low delay traffic can be sent
down another. I guess this is the QoS on linux (tc); but I kept loosing
concentration while reading those.... any experience to match 'Cisco'
QoS with priority queue's and fair-queue.

Secondly, I'd like to emulate a frame-relay link... and be able to limit
the access-rate to something like 32Kbits/64Kbits. I don't really want
to buy frame-realy hardware and cables.. Any experience with
frame-relay, is it possible to run this logically, over Ethernet/Regular
Serial... THis of course is only between two machines and not into a
public network.

Thirdly, if it;s possible to get a frame-relay (back-to-back) then tools
to be able to write frames directly to the frame-relay link... Hopefully
avoiding C (but I will learn this if I have to)..
I guess what I'm getting at is that I only want to fragment data (with
MLPPP) when there's no voice.
        i) Data - encapsulate IP packets as plain frames.
        ii) Data with Voice - send data through MLPPP, and voice as plain
frames.

This is the biggest issue which I don't fully understand; as I see it
(simplistically) I'd have a plain frame link, which I could send some
frames down, and the MLPPP link which I could send other frames down.
I'm guessing that the frame-relay link would have a device (like fra0),
the ppp would be another device (ppp0) bound to (fra0). Then I'd need
some logical devices (log0) where data would be sent, then I'd
manipulate if the log0 device is bound to ppp0 or fra0. Hopefully this
is still making sense?

Fourth, any tools around on linux to generate traffic (I'm used to
Spirent Smartbits), essentially I'd like to be able to define a rate,
packet size, and traffic type (48Kbps 1514byte TCP frames)...

I guess it's probably not of interest to most (I am only using linux for
the hardware).. I apologise for abusing your bandwidth if your on a slow
link.. If people feel it should be taken off-list then mail me direct.

I've started reading around, but others people's experience may prove
more valuable. (At least writing it down has made me think about things
a bit more!).

I've only got three weeks to work out the feasibility (and find another
project if it's not feasible), and only have a limited amount of time to
work on it.

Thanks in advance....

Adam

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