sar question

sar question

Post by Schelfhout » Tue, 06 Oct 1998 04:00:00



Hi there,

When installing a new system I make it a habbit to set up sar to be able to
trace system flaws or hickups in the past.  
Only this morning I installed it on an existing system that has been
assigned to me for now.  After a test I saw something strange :

# sar -q

SunOS l1mech1 5.5.1 Generic_103640-17 sun4u    10/05/98

10:10:00 runq-sz %runocc swpq-sz %swpocc
10:11:59        unix restarts
10:12:42        unix restarts
10:20:01     1.7       7                
10:30:00     3.4       2                
10:31:56        unix restarts
10:40:00     5.8      38                
10:50:00     2.8      63        

The crontab for sa1 is set every 10 minutes.

I'm curious to knows what the "unix restarts" means.  
Thanks in advance

Tim

 
 
 

sar question

Post by Jim McDonnel » Tue, 06 Oct 1998 04:00:00


It means that the system was rebooted.

Jim


> Hi there,

> When installing a new system I make it a habbit to set up sar to be able to
> trace system flaws or hickups in the past.
> Only this morning I installed it on an existing system that has been
> assigned to me for now.  After a test I saw something strange :

> # sar -q

> SunOS l1mech1 5.5.1 Generic_103640-17 sun4u    10/05/98

> 10:10:00 runq-sz %runocc swpq-sz %swpocc
> 10:11:59        unix restarts
> 10:12:42        unix restarts
> 10:20:01     1.7       7
> 10:30:00     3.4       2
> 10:31:56        unix restarts
> 10:40:00     5.8      38
> 10:50:00     2.8      63

> The crontab for sa1 is set every 10 minutes.

> I'm curious to knows what the "unix restarts" means.
> Thanks in advance

> Tim


 
 
 

sar question

Post by Ed Finc » Wed, 07 Oct 1998 04:00:00



> Hi there,

> When installing a new system I make it a habbit to set up sar to be able to
> trace system flaws or hickups in the past.
> Only this morning I installed it on an existing system that has been
> assigned to me for now.  After a test I saw something strange :

FWIW, I've written some Perl scripts that graph the output from sar;
see http://www.vais.net/~efinch for the code.

Best regards,
Ed
--
   Q: Why do PCs have a reset button on the front?
   A: Because they are expected to run Microsoft operating systems.

 
 
 

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