Newbie Tar Backup Questions.

Newbie Tar Backup Questions.

Post by Nitin Mul » Thu, 29 Apr 1999 04:00:00



Hi all,

I'll appreciate comments on all or any of the following issues.

1. Daily Incremental Backup

What's a GNU incremental backup? That is tar with -g option. Does that
mean it will compare the files in the archive with the filesystem and
copy over only those files that have changed? I think this is done with
upgrade (tar -u).

To be specific how I can do the following:
Compare the filesystem with the files in the archive and overwrite only
those files that have changed and append files that are newly created in
the filesystem.

2. Dealing with Users

We constantly have users overwriting/deleting a file accidentally and
more interestingly they expect us to recover it. Replicating a disk
continuously (RAID) or restoring a previous days backup is not very
useful in such a situation. I was considering implementing something
rather simple as follows:

I want to take an hourly backup of files that have changed or are new to
a separate archive so that I can have multiple instances of edited files
during the day. That way if users overwrite files acidentally, I can
recover them to their previous instance from the backup. At the EOD all
these archives will be purged (but the last one). Any better ways to do
this?

3. Backup Admin Tools on Linux

It's pretty hard to find docs on tar/backup related stuff. Is there any
Backup HOWTO? I'm using RedHat Linux 5.2. Are there any cool tools for
backup admin on Linux?

TIA,
Nitin.

 
 
 

Newbie Tar Backup Questions.

Post by Adam Pric » Thu, 29 Apr 1999 04:00:00



>2. Dealing with Users

>We constantly have users overwriting/deleting a file accidentally and
>more interestingly they expect us to recover it. Replicating a disk
>continuously (RAID) or restoring a previous days backup is not very
>useful in such a situation. I was considering implementing something
>rather simple as follows:

>I want to take an hourly backup of files that have changed or are new to
>a separate archive so that I can have multiple instances of edited files
>during the day. That way if users overwrite files acidentally, I can
>recover them to their previous instance from the backup. At the EOD all
>these archives will be purged (but the last one). Any better ways to do
>this?

Yep Get yourself a big stick and paint on it CLUE ! Apply to the back of the
head of anyone who doesn't understand that 'Unix assumes you know what you
are doing' and 'gone means gone'.
(L)user education, its the only way. Then tell them to do backups of
important files before they edit.

Sorry no technical help today.
Adam

 
 
 

Newbie Tar Backup Questions.

Post by kg » Thu, 29 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Regarding your question about hourly backup of specific user files, I
did something similar.  I wrote a simple script file that would do a
backup of certain files & directories at certain times of the day.
Since I was running Four Hard Drive, which were mirrored 2-to-2, I
already had built-in backup in my mirrored drives, as well as a tape
backup.  However, for those times when I could use a "quick" restore, I
found that having a recent backup already on the HD was REALLY helpful.
So, I wrote this script that I simply put in cron, to backup certain
files to special backup directories on the drives that the data was not
on.  For example, if the data I wanted to backup was on drive 1, I would
put the backup copy of it on drive two.  You can time this as often as
you want, but depending on your system, when the backup is running, it
could affect system performance.  One thing I did was do an entire
backup of the Accounts Payable data everyday during lunch, and
immediately after closing, even though I later did a tape backup at 9:00
every night.  THis way, if the tape didn't run, I STILL had a good
backup of the day's AP.  Anyway, just a few thoughts that might be
helpful.
--Keith
 
 
 

Newbie Tar Backup Questions.

Post by Chris Myer » Fri, 30 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Nitin,

Try getting hold of a book called RedHat Linux Secrets (or something Linux
Secrets).  It has all the info you'd need for newbie-adv. intermmediate.

Chris


> Hi all,

> I'll appreciate comments on all or any of the following issues.

> 1. Daily Incremental Backup

> What's a GNU incremental backup? That is tar with -g option. Does that
> mean it will compare the files in the archive with the filesystem and
> copy over only those files that have changed? I think this is done with
> upgrade (tar -u).

> To be specific how I can do the following:
> Compare the filesystem with the files in the archive and overwrite only
> those files that have changed and append files that are newly created in
> the filesystem.

> 2. Dealing with Users

> We constantly have users overwriting/deleting a file accidentally and
> more interestingly they expect us to recover it. Replicating a disk
> continuously (RAID) or restoring a previous days backup is not very
> useful in such a situation. I was considering implementing something
> rather simple as follows:

> I want to take an hourly backup of files that have changed or are new to
> a separate archive so that I can have multiple instances of edited files
> during the day. That way if users overwrite files acidentally, I can
> recover them to their previous instance from the backup. At the EOD all
> these archives will be purged (but the last one). Any better ways to do
> this?

> 3. Backup Admin Tools on Linux

> It's pretty hard to find docs on tar/backup related stuff. Is there any
> Backup HOWTO? I'm using RedHat Linux 5.2. Are there any cool tools for
> backup admin on Linux?

> TIA,
> Nitin.