Sys Admin educaton

Sys Admin educaton

Post by Mike Ekhol » Fri, 28 Mar 1997 04:00:00



I am intrested in becoming a Sys Admin (I am just out of high school, and
currently getting a educatiin is Computerand Digital Systems, hardware
side) and I was wondering what kind of other education should get. just
so you do not start flaming me, I do know my way around a UNIX system.

--
--

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "All I ask for is a T1 to my house, is that too much to ask for?"

 
 
 

Sys Admin educaton

Post by Michael T. Ker » Wed, 02 Apr 1997 04:00:00




Quote:>I am intrested in becoming a Sys Admin (I am just out of high school, and

For starters, get some books from O'Reilly & assoc, look at www.ora.com.
Their "Essential System Administration" is very good.  Also check out "UNIX
System Administration Handbook" by Nemeth, Snyder, Seebass and Hein, published
by Prentice-Hall.  Also get any of the UNIX books by Mark G. Sobell that
are published by Benjamin/Cummings.  And keep going to school!  Get as much
contact with knowledgable people as you can, if they see you are capable and
interested, most will be very helpful to you.  Talking to people who really
know what UNIX is all about is probably the most valuable thing you can do
to learn UNIX.  

Also keep reading the usenet groups that are relevant.  After awhile you'll
get a feeling for who is factual and who is not really that knowledgable.

Quote:>so you do not start flaming me, I do know my way around a UNIX system.

That's the way every sys admin has felt at the start of their career! <grin>
Keep plugging at it, we've all gone through times when we think we know what's
going on only to be slapped down by something that makes pick ourselves up,
dust ourselves off, grab our tush with both hands and learn more about UNIX!

Quote:>      "All I ask for is a T1 to my house, is that too much to ask for?"

That's the spirit!  Keep your goals high, higher expectations always result in
higher achievements!!  

Good Luck!

Mike Kerns
UNIX System Administrator
The Boeing Company
Seattle, WA.


 
 
 

Sys Admin educaton

Post by John Butterfiel » Thu, 03 Apr 1997 04:00:00





> >I am intrested in becoming a Sys Admin (I am just out of high school, and

> For starters, get some books from O'Reilly & assoc, look at www.ora.com.
> Their "Essential System Administration" is very good.  Also check out "UNIX
> System Administration Handbook" by Nemeth, Snyder, Seebass and Hein, published
> by Prentice-Hall.  Also get any of the UNIX books by Mark G. Sobell that
> are published by Benjamin/Cummings.  And keep going to school!  Get as much
> contact with knowledgable people as you can, if they see you are capable and
> interested, most will be very helpful to you.  Talking to people who really
> know what UNIX is all about is probably the most valuable thing you can do
> to learn UNIX.

> Also keep reading the usenet groups that are relevant.  After awhile you'll
> get a feeling for who is factual and who is not really that knowledgable.

> >so you do not start flaming me, I do know my way around a UNIX system.

> That's the way every sys admin has felt at the start of their career! <grin>
> Keep plugging at it, we've all gone through times when we think we know what's
> going on only to be slapped down by something that makes pick ourselves up,
> dust ourselves off, grab our tush with both hands and learn more about UNIX!

> >      "All I ask for is a T1 to my house, is that too much to ask for?"

> That's the spirit!  Keep your goals high, higher expectations always result in
> higher achievements!!

> Good Luck!

> Mike Kerns
> UNIX System Administrator
> The Boeing Company
> Seattle, WA.


One suggestion that I would give is setting up LINUX on a PC.  I know
that some people will disagree but I found that it was invaluable.
Especially after having to reload the system seven times before it was
really stable ("rm -r *" ;^) ).  It is an inexpensive was to get UNIX
admin experience.
John Butterfield
Internet System Administrator
State Farm Insurance
 
 
 

Sys Admin educaton

Post by Todd Graham Lewi » Thu, 03 Apr 1997 04:00:00



> One suggestion that I would give is setting up LINUX on a PC.  I know
> that some people will disagree but I found that it was invaluable.
> Especially after having to reload the system seven times before it was
> really stable ("rm -r *" ;^) ).  It is an inexpensive was to get UNIX
> admin experience.

Triple agreement on this count.  Running your own Linux system at home is
an invaluable tool to an up-and-coming sysadmin.  The two goals which you
should keep in mind are:

1) Everything you use, learn it inside and out.  You don't have to do it
all at once, but when you start using tar, start reading the man page.  A
few weeks later, try out one of its features.  A few weeks later, try the
network-backup features.  When you get a chance to log into a sun machine,
read (or better yet print out) the man page for sun's version of tar.  Try
to figure out the most gross, disgusting, mangled invocation of tar which
you can figure out.  Think of your time playing with your Linux system as
boot camp; the more stuff you figure out now, the better your chances of
getting out of 'nam (being a real sysadmin) alive.

2) Learn as much as possible, consistent with the above statement.  I for
one concentrate in networking, network monitoring, and network security.
I learned it all on a Linux box.

If you want more pointers, feel free to contact me privately via email.

--
Todd Graham Lewis             Linux!                 Core Engineering

 
 
 

Sys Admin educaton

Post by Michael T. Ker » Sat, 05 Apr 1997 04:00:00




Quote:

>One suggestion that I would give is setting up LINUX on a PC.  I know
>that some people will disagree but I found that it was invaluable.
>Especially after having to reload the system seven times before it was
>really stable ("rm -r *" ;^) ).  It is an inexpensive was to get UNIX
>admin experience.
>John Butterfield
>Internet System Administrator
>State Farm Insurance

Also a great idea!  It gives you a low-cost way of creating a system that you
can break without incurring financial or termination risks. <grin>

Mike Kerns
UNIX System Administrator
The Boeing Company
Seattle, WA.

The opinions stated in this posting are not the opinions of anyone or
anything living or dead, real or imagined, impactive or inconsequential
other than myself. Any and all actions against these opinions shall be
compensated by indignation or $0.02, whichever is lesser.

 
 
 

Sys Admin educaton

Post by Patrick Leu » Tue, 08 Apr 1997 04:00:00


: I am intrested in becoming a Sys Admin (I am just out of high school, and
: currently getting a educatiin is Computerand Digital Systems, hardware
: side) and I was wondering what kind of other education should get. just
: so you do not start flaming me, I do know my way around a UNIX system.

read man pages
read o'reilly books
read usent

and practice, practice, practice
nothing can replace hands on experience
there are lots of things that can only be learned by doing, and not by
reading alone

get a minimum wage job if that's the only way you can get your hands on some
neat sparc machines to work with at the computer room

as you get more experience, it becomes easier to look for better paying jobs
and higher positions

don't be too quick to discard that computer operator job where you have to
work from 12am to 6am ;-))  feel the  heat or cold of that computer room

and get used to talking to angry users, dealing with their problems

good luck,
Patrick

 
 
 

Sys Admin educaton

Post by jg.. » Tue, 08 Apr 1997 04:00:00




>>I am intrested in becoming a Sys Admin (I am just out of high school, and
>>      "All I ask for is a T1 to my house, is that too much to ask for?"
> That's the spirit!  Keep your goals high, higher expectations always result in
> higher achievements!!
> Good Luck!

  Cheers to Michael Kerns!! This is the type of encouragement I like to
see. I think Mike Ekholm is on the right track and if he follows this
advice he might even get a job a Boeing!
  I've also read one of the best ways of learning Unix is to set up
Linux on a spare machine and ride it into the ground. Spend 6 to 12
months and don't expect to have a life during that time. Good luck Mike
Ekholm.
 
 
 

Sys Admin educaton

Post by Henry Avatar Ch » Tue, 08 Apr 1997 04:00:00


: >really stable ("rm -r *" ;^) ).  It is an inexpensive was to get UNIX

Just out of curiosity, does
rm -r *
get rid of *ALL* your files?
If not, what permutation of rm or command will?

thx,
Henry

 
 
 

Sys Admin educaton

Post by Mike Ekhol » Thu, 10 Apr 1997 04:00:00


On 7 Apr 1997 21:41:28 GMT, Henry Avatar said these wise words:
: : >really stable ("rm -r *" ;^) ).  It is an inexpensive was to get UNIX

: Just out of curiosity, does
: rm -r *
: get rid of *ALL* your files?
: If not, what permutation of rm or command will?

from my what I know it does, even worse 'rm -rR /*'

I want to say thanks to everyone that responded. I have got alot of good
advice.  I am glad to get this advice from people what have learned the
ropes. I have just got my first 'true' unix system running, a HP apollo
425t. I plan to learn my way around this sytem, as well as the netbsd
partition on my Macintosh.

again, thanks everyone for your resopnces -- --

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "All I ask for is a T1 to my house, is that too much to ask for?"

 
 
 

Sys Admin educaton

Post by Frank Cusa » Thu, 10 Apr 1997 04:00:00


-r & -R are the same option for rm. You need -f and .* to get all files

rm -rf /* /.*

|> On 7 Apr 1997 21:41:28 GMT, Henry Avatar said these wise words:
|> : : >really stable ("rm -r *" ;^) ).  It is an inexpensive was to get UNIX
|>
|> : Just out of curiosity, does
|> : rm -r *
|> : get rid of *ALL* your files?
|> : If not, what permutation of rm or command will?
|>
|> from my what I know it does, even worse 'rm -rR /*'
|>
|> I want to say thanks to everyone that responded. I have got alot of good
|> advice.  I am glad to get this advice from people what have learned the
|> ropes. I have just got my first 'true' unix system running, a HP apollo
|> 425t. I plan to learn my way around this sytem, as well as the netbsd
|> partition on my Macintosh.
|>
|> again, thanks everyone for your resopnces -- --

|> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
|>       "All I ask for is a T1 to my house, is that too much to ask for?"

--
~frank

 
 
 

1. difference between Sys Admin & Sys Analyst?


A Systems Administrator is usually above a Systems Analyst.  A Sys Admin
is responsible for the administration and upkeep of a system(s).  SysAdmins
are often in a management position (Director of Information Systems, Systems
Manager, etc).

A Systems Analyst is one who analyzes manual or automated processes and
determines how best to automate them.  It often involves programming, but
not always.  Often SysAdmins start out as Analysts.

This is very brief, but gives you the idea.
--
  /--------------------------------------------------------------------------\
  | Mark A. Davis     | Lake Taylor Hospital | Norfolk,VA (804)-461-5001x431 |

  \--------------------------------------------------------------------------/

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