'r' option of restore (dump/restore)

'r' option of restore (dump/restore)

Post by Thomas Jest » Wed, 18 Jun 1997 04:00:00



I am setting up dump/restore on a number of UNIX servers (Digital Unix,
IRIX, SunOS) and see in the man pages for restore that an 'r' option for
a level 0 restore requires that you have a "clear" file system.  In fact,
the man page shows a typical level 0 restore with the creation of a new
file system (mkfs/newfs), and then a mount to it.  Does this mean I have
to create a new file system, or can I just do an 'rm -r *' to remove all
the files?  Wouldn't this accomplish the same thing?

Thanks very much in advance for any thoughts or comments.

==============================================================================
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|  Programmer/Analyst              |  Fax      (908) 263-5112                |
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==============================================================================

 
 
 

'r' option of restore (dump/restore)

Post by Contract » Fri, 20 Jun 1997 04:00:00



> I am setting up dump/restore on a number of UNIX servers (Digital Unix,
> IRIX, SunOS) and see in the man pages for restore that an 'r' option for
> a level 0 restore requires that you have a "clear" file system.  In fact,
> the man page shows a typical level 0 restore with the creation of a new
> file system (mkfs/newfs), and then a mount to it.  Does this mean I have
> to create a new file system, or can I just do an 'rm -r *' to remove all
> the files?  Wouldn't this accomplish the same thing?

> Thanks very much in advance for any thoughts or comments.

Hi Thomas,

        I had the exact same setup when I worked for another company.
Whenever we restored a level 0 backup, we used mkfs/newfs simply because
it's fast and clean.  When you use 'rm -r *', there can be permissions
issues and users logged on etc...  But I don't see why you can't use
'rm -r *'.  Have fun!
                                        -Barbara-

    Barbara O'Connell
  Information Technology
 |-----------------------|
 | Hewlett Packard Co.   |
 | Medical Products Group|
 | Andover, MA 01810-1099|
|---------------------------|

 ---------------------------

 
 
 

'r' option of restore (dump/restore)

Post by Thomas Jest » Sun, 22 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Much thanks to Carl, Curtis, Alan, and Andrew who provided excellent answers
to this question.  The general consensus is that the two methods will
do the same thing, but mkfs/newfs is much faster.  And with a large
number of files/directories, 'rm -r *' can take a long time.
One person adds that it may be desirable to copy the "extra" files that
are not in the backup (since they were added at a later time) to another
file system, then bring back whatever is useful after the full and
incremental restores.

==============================================================================
|  Tom Jester                      |  Phone    (908) 571-3558                |
|  Programmer/Analyst              |  Fax      (908) 263-5112                |
|  Monmouth University             |                                         |

==============================================================================


> I am setting up dump/restore on a number of UNIX servers (Digital Unix,
> IRIX, SunOS) and see in the man pages for restore that an 'r' option for
> a level 0 restore requires that you have a "clear" file system.  In fact,
> the man page shows a typical level 0 restore with the creation of a new
> file system (mkfs/newfs), and then a mount to it.  Does this mean I have
> to create a new file system, or can I just do an 'rm -r *' to remove all
> the files?  Wouldn't this accomplish the same thing?

 
 
 

1. Q: where is 'dump' and 'restore' for linux?

I have some 4mm dat tapes written to by a DEC machine using DUMP.  I can read
these files with an HPUX system, and I'd like to be able to use them on linux
as well.  Is there a dump/restore source/binary set for linux?  As a reminder,
I would do:

# dump 0u

and

# restore i

to save/restore my files.

Any ideas/plans?

Or, is there similar functionality I'm missing?

thanks,

--
.bl

web: <a href="ftp://ftp.netcom.com/pub/blevin/index.html"> Bryan Levin </a>

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