number of uses allowable in BSDi

number of uses allowable in BSDi

Post by Rob Robi » Wed, 01 Jan 2003 04:08:45



Hi all,

     What's the maximum number of users BSDi can support ?

Thanks,
Rob

 
 
 

number of uses allowable in BSDi

Post by those who know me have no need of my nam » Wed, 01 Jan 2003 04:27:17


in comp.unix.admin i read:

Quote:>     What's the maximum number of users BSDi can support ?

if i only had a brain: somewhere between 0 and ~32700, if i'm remembering
the uid limitation on bsd/os from the days when it was called bsdi because
that's the name of the company that produced it.  if you mean wind river's
current offering then it's between 0 and ~2 billion.

if you'd like a stab at a real answer you are going to have to pony-up lots
more information, e.g., which version(s) of bsd/os are under consideration,
what sort of hardware budget do you have or want to target, what sorts of
services must it support, how often will each user attempt to make use of
those services, what is the quality of the environmental factors, what is
the quality of the administration and operations staff, &c.

--
bringing you boring signatures for 17 years

 
 
 

number of uses allowable in BSDi

Post by Andreas Karre » Wed, 01 Jan 2003 23:24:25


Quote:> if you'd like a stab at a real answer you are going to have to pony-up lots
> more information, e.g., which version(s) of bsd/os are under consideration,
> what sort of hardware budget do you have or want to target, what sorts of
> services must it support, how often will each user attempt to make use of
> those services, what is the quality of the environmental factors, what is
> the quality of the administration and operations staff, &c.

I always liked DEC manuals:

  "With DIGITAL UNIX Version 4.0D, the maximum number of UIDs and GIDs
   allowed increases from 65,535 (16 bits) to 2,147,483,647 (31 bits).
   Note that this increase does not mean that 2.14 million users can
   simultaneously log into a system"

                 -- Release Notes for Digital UNIX Version 4.0D

I do not know if they ever published an updated version that corrected
the "2.14 million" mistake.

 - Andi

 
 
 

number of uses allowable in BSDi

Post by p.. » Wed, 01 Jan 2003 23:38:16



Quote:> in comp.unix.admin i read:
>>     What's the maximum number of users BSDi can support ?
> if i only had a brain: somewhere between 0 and ~32700, if i'm remembering
> the uid limitation on bsd/os from the days when it was called bsdi because
> that's the name of the company that produced it.  if you mean wind river's
> current offering then it's between 0 and ~2 billion.

BSDi has a UID of 32 bits, just like any other *BSD.
( BSDi V2 as i recall) BSD/OS certenly has.

Quote:> if you'd like a stab at a real answer you are going to have to pony-up lots
> more information, e.g., which version(s) of bsd/os are under consideration,
> what sort of hardware budget do you have or want to target, what sorts of
> services must it support, how often will each user attempt to make use of
> those services, what is the quality of the environmental factors, what is
> the quality of the administration and operations staff, &c.
> --
> bringing you boring signatures for 17 years

--
Peter H?kanson        
        IPSec  Sverige      ( At Gothenburg Riverside )
           Sorry about my e-mail address, but i'm trying to keep spam out,
           remove "icke-reklam" if you feel for mailing me. Thanx.
 
 
 

number of uses allowable in BSDi

Post by those who know me have no need of my nam » Thu, 02 Jan 2003 00:51:50


in comp.unix.admin i read:



>> in comp.unix.admin i read:
>>>     What's the maximum number of users BSDi can support ?

>> if i only had a brain: somewhere between 0 and ~32700, if i'm remembering
>> the uid limitation on bsd/os from the days when it was called bsdi because
>> that's the name of the company that produced it.  if you mean wind river's
>> current offering then it's between 0 and ~2 billion.

>BSDi has a UID of 32 bits, just like any other *BSD.
>( BSDi V2 as i recall) BSD/OS certenly has.

and it's signed.  you can push your luck by allocating as if it were
unsigned, hoping that all applications test for ``==(uid_t)-1'' instead of
``<0''.

bsdi v1, if i'm remembering correctly, used 16 bit (signed) uid's.

--
bringing you boring signatures for 17 years