INIT: Paging Space is low

INIT: Paging Space is low

Post by Richard Chan » Mon, 05 May 1997 04:00:00



Hi,
I recently got above message often on my console, I guess because my
rootvg is almost full, but my SMIT is currently not working. Can anyone
tell me how to solve this problem ( I mean which commands I can type
since my SMIT is not working.)
Thanks much.

Richard Chang

 
 
 

INIT: Paging Space is low

Post by Dan Riede » Tue, 06 May 1997 04:00:00



> Hi,
> I recently got above message often on my console, I guess because my
> rootvg is almost full, but my SMIT is currently not working. Can anyone
> tell me how to solve this problem ( I mean which commands I can type
> since my SMIT is not working.)
> Thanks much.

> Richard Chang


To check physical memory:
    # lsdev -Cc memory
        Check for "Available" vs. "Defined"

To check check paging space:
    # lsps -a
        2 * physical
        "Active"
        Less than 60% used

A more important question might be:
    # How do I fix smit

Dan

 
 
 

INIT: Paging Space is low

Post by Jaime Vazqu » Tue, 06 May 1997 04:00:00



> Hi,
> I recently got above message often on my console, I guess because my
> rootvg is almost full, but my SMIT is currently not working. Can anyone
> tell me how to solve this problem ( I mean which commands I can type
> since my SMIT is not working.)
> Thanks much.

> Richard Chang


You can use lsps -a to see how much page space is allocated what disks it
is on,  and what % is being used.  Be aware that you may have a swapspace
defined but not active and the lsps -a command will show that.  The amount of
real memory in the system is NOT a factor in this. If a page space is defined
but not active, you can activate it using "swapon /dev/<pg-space-name>".

From the error message, I think you are just about fully utilized.  Question
here is, do you get this when you try to invoke smit? That could explain why
it does not work.  You can invoke the curses based version of smit in a window
or screen using "smitty".  This is less memory stressfull.  

Anyway, you need to add more swap space in order to get work done or kill
some jobs that are taking up swapspace.  A command to try is "slibclean".  
This will unload any shared libraries that have been loaded but are not being
used by any processes.

Use the lsvg rootvg command to see what free space you have available.  Look
for FREE PPS.  This is the number of free physical partitions available to
use for swap space in the root volume group.  A paging space can reside on
any defined volume group, not just rootvg.  If rootvg is full, you can check
any other volume groups for space.

Command line options to create a paging space:

        mkps -s # -a -n  vg-name  (ex.  mkps -s 5  -a -n rootvg)

        The -n says use it now, the -a says make active each time system is
        restarted.  The example will create a page space on rootvg of 5
        physical partitions.

If you want to specify which disk to put the page space, add the hdisk name
at the end of the command.  I would recommend, if at all possible, to allocate
new paging spaces on separate disks.

You can increase the size of a paging space using:
        chps -s # <page-space-name>   (ex. chps -s 4 hd6).

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Jaime Vazquez

--

RISC System/6000 OEM Consulting Services, IBM-Austin/9810            
<All standard disclaimers apply. Non-standard disclaimers do too.>