Can't run sar

Can't run sar

Post by Otto Garc » Tue, 23 Dec 1997 04:00:00



Running sar causes the following error message:

        sar: can't open /var/adm/sa/sa16
        No such file or directory

If we make the directory, sar works;  a few days later the
error changed to:

        sar: can't open /var/adm/sa/sa22
        No such file or directory

Obviously making a directory on a daily basis is not going
to be an option.  Could someone provide some info to
get around this (misconfiguration)?

Thanks!

P.S.  When replying please change my email address to:

 
 
 

Can't run sar

Post by Ernesto Hern├índez-Novic » Tue, 23 Dec 1997 04:00:00



> Running sar causes the following error message:

>         sar: can't open /var/adm/sa/sa16
>         No such file or directory

> If we make the directory, sar works;  a few days later the
> error changed to:

>         sar: can't open /var/adm/sa/sa22
>         No such file or directory

> Obviously making a directory on a daily basis is not going
> to be an option.  Could someone provide some info to
> get around this (misconfiguration)?

The directory /var/adm/sa should contain _files_ (not directories) named
sa[0-3][0-9], one for each day of the month. These files are used to
collect kernel counter so that sar can give you a meaningful report. The
creation of the files is irrelevant (that is, you can 'touch' them,
'cat' them, whatever) if you don't set up statistic collection properly.
The collection is performed by a program usually named 'sadc', but on
many platforms a front-end shell script known as 'sa1' is used.
You should setup sa1 so that it executes periodically (this of course
can be arranged with an appropiate crontab). It is also important to
make sure your system start up scripts execute sadc in order to create a
'unix boot'-sar record; if you fail to do so, the collection won't work.
RTFM... for sar(1), sadc(1) and sa1(1). In my HP box there is even an
example on how to set up your cron properly.
As to how often the collection should be performed, on heavily used
systems use an interval no less than fif* minutes on working days and
twenty minutes on weekends.

--

Just another Unix/Perl/Java hacker.
One thing is to be the best, and another is to be the most popular.
Unix: Live free or die!

 
 
 

Can't run sar

Post by Dave » Tue, 23 Dec 1997 04:00:00




> > Running sar causes the following error message:

> >         sar: can't open /var/adm/sa/sa16
> >         No such file or directory

> > If we make the directory, sar works;  a few days later the
> > error changed to:

> >         sar: can't open /var/adm/sa/sa22
> >         No such file or directory

> > Obviously making a directory on a daily basis is not going
> > to be an option.  Could someone provide some info to
> > get around this (misconfiguration)?

> The directory /var/adm/sa should contain _files_ (not directories) named
> sa[0-3][0-9], one for each day of the month. These files are used to
> collect kernel counter so that sar can give you a meaningful report. The
> creation of the files is irrelevant (that is, you can 'touch' them,
> 'cat' them, whatever) if you don't set up statistic collection properly.
> The collection is performed by a program usually named 'sadc', but on
> many platforms a front-end shell script known as 'sa1' is used.
> You should setup sa1 so that it executes periodically (this of course
> can be arranged with an appropiate crontab). It is also important to
> make sure your system start up scripts execute sadc in order to create a
> 'unix boot'-sar record; if you fail to do so, the collection won't work.
> RTFM... for sar(1), sadc(1) and sa1(1). In my HP box there is even an
> example on how to set up your cron properly.
> As to how often the collection should be performed, on heavily used
> systems use an interval no less than fif* minutes on working days and
> twenty minutes on weekends.

> --

> Just another Unix/Perl/Java hacker.
> One thing is to be the best, and another is to be the most popular.
> Unix: Live free or die!

In a nut shell, make sure that the directory /var/adm/sa exists.  sa1
will create the daily files for you.

Have fun!
--
===============================================================

UNIX/WAN Admin-at-large        http://www.veryComputer.com/~drace
===============================================================
          "I have given up my search for truth,
         and am now looking for a good fantasy."
                                  - (c) Ashleigh Brilliant
                                    used by permission.

 
 
 

Can't run sar

Post by Doug Russel » Wed, 24 Dec 1997 04:00:00


REad the man page on sar. If you give it no paramaters it attemts to
use a log file in the directory that it lists in the error.
There are paramaters that have it run without this file.


>Running sar causes the following error message:

> sar: can't open /var/adm/sa/sa16
> No such file or directory

>If we make the directory, sar works;  a few days later the
>error changed to:

> sar: can't open /var/adm/sa/sa22
> No such file or directory

>Obviously making a directory on a daily basis is not going
>to be an option.  Could someone provide some info to
>get around this (misconfiguration)?

>Thanks!

>P.S.  When replying please change my email address to:


 
 
 

1. Can't run sar

Running sar causes the following error message:

        sar: can't open /var/adm/sa/sa16
        No such file or directory

If we make the directory, sar works;  a few days later the
error changed to:

        sar: can't open /var/adm/sa/sa22
        No such file or directory

Obviously making a directory on a daily basis is not going
to be an option.  Could someone provide some info to
get around this (misconfiguration)?

Thanks!

P.S.  When replying please change my email address to:

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