USENIX SUMMER 1993 TECHNICAL CONFERENCE: TUTORIAL PROGRAM

USENIX SUMMER 1993 TECHNICAL CONFERENCE: TUTORIAL PROGRAM

Post by Carolyn Ca » Thu, 20 May 1993 08:07:56



                         TUTORIAL PROGRAM

             Monday and Tuesday, JUNE 21 AND 22, 1993

             USENIX SUMMER 1993 TECHNICAL CONFERENCE
                        JUNE 21-25, 1993
                  CINCINNATI CONVENTION CENTER
                        CINCINNATI, OHIO

You may choose from among twenty tutorials, both  full  and  half
day,  covering topics essential to your professional development.
Of these twenty, twelve are offered at USENIX for the first  time
and   a   thirteenth   is   updated   in  coverage!   The  USENIX
Association's well-respected tutorial program offers  you  intro-
ductory  as  well as advanced, intensive and practical tutorials.
Tutorials are presented by skilled instructors who  are  hands-on
experts  in  their  topic areas.  All tutorials offer printed ma-
terials to support your understanding and provide reference at  a
later  time.  The USENIX tutorial program meets the needs of pro-
fessionals who require an immediately practical learning  experi-
ence.   Attend  the tutorials at Cincinnati and benefit from this
in-depth exploration and skill development in essential areas  of
UNIX-related technology.

USENIX tutorial program attendance is limited.   Pre-registration
is strongly recommended.

SPECIAL NOTE FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS
Your Immediate  Attention  Is Requested!

A  limited  number  of  spaces  in  each tutorial are
reserved for full-time students at the special fee of $50.00  per
tutorial.   You  MUST  telephone the USENIX Conference Office, +1
(714) 588-8649 during office hours of  8:30  am-5:00  pm  Pacific
Time  Monday-Friday,  to confirm availability and make a reserva-
tion. You will receive a reservation code  number.   This  number
MUST  appear  on  your  Registration Form. Your registration form
with full payment and a photocopy of your  current  student  I.D.
card  MUST  arrive  within 14 days from the date of your reserva-
tion.  If your registration form and payment  do  not  arrive  by
that  date,  your reservation will be cancelled. This special fee
is non-transferable.

MONDAY, JUNE 21

9:00 am - 5:00 pm (includes box lunch)

M1  HOW NETWORKS WORK - NEW!
M2  OSF'S DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING ENVIRONMENT (DCE)
M3  THE KERBEROS APPROACH TO NETWORK SECURITY - REVISED!
M4  ESSENTIAL UNIX PROGRAMMING
M5  UNIX SVR4.2 INTERNALS, PART 1: PROCESS AND VIRTUAL MEMORY
    SYSTEMS AND MP SUPPORT - NEW!
M6  INTRODUCTION TO THREADS, POSIX PTHREADS, AND
    OSF/DCE THREADS - UPDATED!
M7  UNIX POWER TOOLS - GETTING THE MOST OUT OF UNIX - NEW!

Morning 1/2 day  9:00 am - 12:30 pm (includes box lunch at 12:30 pm)

M8  SECURITY AND THE X WINDOW SYSTEM - NEW!
M9  TOPICS IN SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION - 1 - NEW!

Afternoon 1/2 day:  1:30 pm - 5:00 pm (includes lunch at 12:30 pm)
M10  MANAGING THE DOMAIN NAME SYSTEM
M11  TOPICS IN SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION - 2 - NEW!

TUESDAY, JUNE 22

9:00 am - 5:00 pm (includes box lunch)
T1  SYMMETRIC MULTIPROCESSING AND CACHING IN UNIX KERNELS
T2  THE DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING ENVIRONMENT REMOTE PROCEDURE CALL SYSTEM
    (DCE RPC) - NEW!
T3  SENDMAIL:  INSIDE AND OUT - NEW!
T4  UNIX NETWORK PROGRAMMING
T5  UNIX SVR4.2 INTERNALS, PART 2: FILE SYSTEMS, I/O AND STREAMS - NEW!
T6  THE WINDOWS NT ARCHITECTURE - NEW!

T7  ACHIEVING SECURITY IN AN INTERNET ENVIRONMENT - NEW!
T8  TCL AND TK: A NEW APPROACH TO X11 AND GUI PROGRAMMING
T9  INSTALLING, CONFIGURING AND ADMINISTERING X SYSTEMS - NEW!

TUTORIAL DESCRIPTIONS

FIRST TIME OFFERED!
M1
HOW NETWORKS WORK
Vincent C. Jones, Consultant

Intended Audience: Designers and technical  managers  responsible
for planning or implementing distributed systems or networked ap-
plications.  Attendees are assumed to be familiar with networking
fundamentals and TCP/IP.

This is not an introduction to networking!   This  tutorial  ties
together  the  theoretical  background and practical implications
which underlie the selection of an appropriate  interconnectivity
architecture.   The  goals  are  many.  First to show how all the
protocols in the TCP/IP suite work together in an internetworking
environment  to  meet  user  application needs. (For example, why
some X windows applications will never be useful over a wide area
network,  even at Gigabit data rates.)  Second, to explore exist-
ing internetwork limitations.  (For example, how  the  definition
of Committed Information Rate in Frame Relay can make or break an
application.)  Third, to allow planning for future problems. (For
example,  how  to  minimize the pain when it becomes necessary to
replace IP.)  Last, to enable effective  architecture  decisions.
(For  example, we will offer criteria for selecting a bridge over
a repeater or router.)

Emphasis is on the internetwork infrastructure needs  of  TCP/IP,
with  an  eye  to the future of networking and the potential need
for coexistence with or migration to Open Systems Interconnection
(OSI) networking.  Specific topics include:

%  The role of repeaters, bridges, routers and protocol conversion
   gateways and how each performs its functions.
%  Routing algorithms for bridges, routers and mail delivery: how
   they work and how they impact network price, performance and size
   limits.
%  Link choices for internetworks, including X.25, frame relay, and
   cell relay.  The role of SLIP and PPP in today's networks.
%  Address resolution and directory service protocols and their impact
   on performance, reliability, manageability, naming, and addressing.

Dr. Vincent Jones is an independent  consultant  specializing  in
the  use  of TCP/IP and OSI to support distributed processing ap-
plications in multivendor environments.  He comes with over twen-
ty  years of practical experience in the application of data com-
munications and computer networking  to  meet  real  user  needs.
Dr.  Jones is author of the book MAP/TOP Networking: A Foundation
for Computer Integrated Manufacturing (McGraw-Hill), co-author of
GOSIP  Made  Easy  (Corporation for Open Systems), and an invited
contributor to the Auerbach Local Area Network  Handbook  and  to
the Chief Information Officer Journal (Auerbach).

M2
OSF'S DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING ENVIRONMENT (DCE)
David  Chappell, Chappell and Associates

Intended Audience:  Those who need an introduction  to  DCE,  in-
cluding those who must develop applications for, support, market,
or plan for DCE or distributed systems  in  general.   A  general
knowledge of networking fundamentals is assumed.  Some background
in a high-level programming language will be helpful, but not re-
quired.

The Distributed  Computing  Environment  was  created  by  the   Open
Software  Foundation  as a vendor-neutral infrastructure for dis-
tributed computing.  Among the vendors promising support for  DCE
are  IBM,  DEC,  HP  and many others.  Running over any transport
protocol, DCE provides solutions for the key problems in creating
distributed systems.

The goal of this tutorial is to give participants an  understand-
ing  of  what services DCE provides and how.  The tutorial intro-
duces DCE via a description of each of  its  component  technolo-
gies, including:

%       a protocol for remote procedure call (RPC)
%       directory services
%       a distributed file service
%       protocols for network security

David Chappell is principal of Chappell & Associates, a  training
and consulting firm focused on vendor-neutral networking.  He has
written and taught many courses on distributed computing and  re-
lated  topics  to  clients  in  North America and Europe, and has
served as  a  consultant  on  numerous  communications  projects.
Among his current projects, David is a consultant to OSF involved
with OSF's  Distributed  Computing  Environment  and  Distributed
Management   Environment.    His   previous  experience  includes
software engineering positions  with  NCR  Corporation  and  Cray
Research.  David holds an MS in Computer Science from the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin-Madison.

M3
THE KERBEROS APPROACH TO NETWORK SECURITY
Dan Geer, Geer Zolot Associates and Jon A. Rochlis, MIT

Intended Audience:   Systems  administrators  who  are  concerned
about,  or  must  mitigate, the inherent lack of security and ac-
countability in conventional UNIX network services  environments;
systems  developers who are responsible for networked workstation
environments, particularly those whose environments include  net-
works  which  are  not  themselves  physically secure (i.e. Ropen
networksS); and technical managers in enterprises where the  flow
of  electronic  information  is at the core of the enterprise and
must be protected without  imposing  the  costs  of  a  security
culture.

We focus on the practical challenges of  providing  security  for
the  cooperative  electronic workplace, which aspires to location
and scale independence in the client-server idiom.   We begin  by
describing network security from a general point of view, so that
you will understand  the  kinds  of  threats  which  result  from
operating  conventional  systems in an open environment.  We then
describe effective approaches to meeting these threats, emphasiz-
ing  the  practical  over  the theoretic.  We then point out some
common fallacies, such as,  the  idea  that  your  organization's
security is materially dependent on close control of external ac-
cess (rather then competent internal security).

Primarily we explain the Kerberos network security system, though
we touch on public-key techniques, e.g., the X.509 authentication
model and the Internet's Privacy Enhanced Mail  (PEM).   Kerberos
is the core of the Open Software Foundation's Distributed Comput-
ing Environment (OSF/DCE), and we thoroughly discuss the DCE  ex-
tensions  and  enhancements  to Kerberos that made it into the de
facto standard for network security.  We  stress  throughout  the
nuts-and-bolts of making this work in your environment, including
administration and integration of new  technology  with  existing
environments.  By the end of the day, you will be able to go home
and start work on a computing environment that is both  open  and
accountable.

Daniel E. Geer, Jr., recently a member of the Technical Staff  of
Digital Equipment Corporation's External Research Program, is now
at Geer Zolot Associates.  For the previous 4.5 years, he was the
Manager  of Systems Development for MIT's Project Athena where he
oversaw the creation of the Athena distributed computing environ-
ment,  including the work that forms the basis for this tutorial.
He holds a BS in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from
MIT and a ScD in Biostatistics from Harvard University.

Jon A. Rochlis is a Technical Supervisor for MIT Distributed Com-
puting and Network Services which runs MITnet and the Athena com-
puting environment (including its Kerberos realm).  Previously he
worked on development of the Amber and Multics operating systems.
Mr. Rochlis received his BS in Computer Science  and  Engineering
from MIT.

M4
ESSENTIAL UNIX PROGRAMMING
Richard Stevens, Consultant

Intended Audience:  Programmers  and  system  administrators  who
want  to  learn  more  about  the essentials of UNIX programming.
Some programming experience in C is assumed.

This tutorial covers current UNIX programming  concepts  required
for  systems  programming.  It does not cover the basic functions
that most programmers are familiar with  (open,  lseek,  standard
I/O,  etc.).  Rather it focuses on the poorly documented features
that tend to be least  understood.   Although  current  standards
such  as  POSIX  are mentioned, the tutorial focuses on two real-
world implementations of the various standards: 4.4BSD and System
V Release 4.

The topics covered are: current UNIX standards,  process  control
(race conditions, sessions, job control), signals (POSIX.1 signal
handling, unreliable signals, interrupted system  calls),  record
locking,  I/O  multiplexing (select and poll), memory mapped I/O,
interprocess  communication  (comparison  of  various   methods),
stream pipes, passing file descriptors, and pseudo terminals.

Richard Stevens is author of the books  Advanced  Programming  in
the  UNIX Environment (1992) and UNIX Network Programming (1990).
He received his PhD in the area  of  image  processing  from  the
University  of  Arizona.   From  1982  until  1990  he  was Vice-
President of Research and Development with Health Systems  Inter-
national.   Currently  he is an author and independent consultant
residing in Tucson, Arizona.

M5
UNIX SVR4.2 INTERNALS, PART 1: PROCESS AND VIRTUAL MEMORY SYSTEMS
AND MP SUPPORT
John R. Levine, Institute for Advanced Professional Studies

Intended Audience:  People who maintain, modify, or port the UNIX
system,  as  well  as to those who are interested in its internal
structure to better understand how  to  construct  efficient  and
portable applications. Attendees should have a working familiari-
ty with UNIX programming at the system call level  and  with  the
ANSI C language.

We present an overview of the structure of the  system  with  em-
phasis on aspects new in SVR4.2.  Topics include the overall sys-
tem structure and the ways in which the  various  subsystems  fit
into  and  support that structure, along with the internal inter-
faces that make SVR4.2 more  extensible  than  its  predecessors.
The first day concentrates on:

The Process Subsystem: The UNIX process abstraction provides sys-
tem  calls,  signals,  job  control,  fork, exec, wait, and other
process-related facilities.  We also discuss the new SVR4.2  gen-
eric  scheduler and the specific scheduling models provided (sys-
tem, real-time, and time sharing).

Virtual Memory: The virtual memory subsystem provides the storage
associated with the UNIX processes.  It supports both traditional
system call disk I/O and page fault initiated I/I with  a  common
buffering and transfer mechanism.  We examine the structures that
support kernel and user address spaces and their use from  system
calls and the pager.

Multi-processor Support: SVR4.2 includes integrated  support  for
multiple   CPUs  in  the  same  system,  with  a  multi-processor
scheduler and locks to insure consistency in shared  data  struc-
tures.  We examine the MP additions to the scheduler, the locking
structure, and an overview of how data structures  are  protected
by locks.

John R. Levine has been writing,  lecturing,  and  consulting  on
UNIX  topics  since  1975.  As a member of the IAPS staff, he has
frequently lectured on UNIX system internals.   His  books  range
from  Graphics  File  Formats  to  UNIX  for  Dummies.   He  also
moderates the usenet  comp.compilers  interest  group  and  edits
several series of technical computer books.

M6
INTRODUCTION TO THREADS, POSIX PTHREADS, AND OSF/DCE THREADS
Nawaf Bitar, Kubota Pacific Computer

Intended  Audience:   Developers  interested  in  learning  about
threads  in general, threads architectures and programming models
in particular.  It is especially useful for developers who  anti-
cipate  working  with  the  OSF/DCE  and/or  the  evolving  POSIX
pthreads standard, both at  the  application  and  implementation
levels.

Multiple threads of control within a process can  effectively  be
used to express parallelism inherent in many applications and en-
vironments such as windowing systems and networked or distributed
systems.   On  multiprocessor architectures they also provide for
concurrent execution.  The Open Software Foundation's Distributed
Computing  Environment (OSF/DCE) uses threads as a basic building
block of the DCE architecture P all DCE components and  many  DCE
applications utilize the DCE threads component and are thus them-
selves multi-threaded.

The tutorial begins with a brief introduction to threads and  the
circumstances under which they are useful.  Discussion of popular
threads models follows.  In particular,  the light-weight and
variable-weight process models are covered as part of a discus-
sion on parallelism granularity.  We then cover  various  threads
implementation  architectures  -  user  space, kernel, and multi-
plexed (two-level schedulers) - as used  in  DEC  Threads  (CMA),
OSF/1, and Solaris 2.0.

The tutorial continues with a presentation of threads programming
techniques  including  master/slave,  client/server  and workcrew
models.  Short example programs will be presented in order to en-
sure that the models are well understood.  Next is a presentation
of the POSIX 1003.4a pthreads interface and the issues that arise
at  the  interface level when introducing threads to UNIX.  Prob-
lems concerning the use of fork and signals in  the  presence  of
threads are discussed in detail.

The tutorial moves on to a  presentation  of  the  pthreads-based
OSF/DCE threads.  In particular, extensions to pthreads including
specialized object attributes and exception handling are  covered
in detail.

A discussion of how fine-grain parallelism can be supported  con-
cludes  the tutorial.  This support is required primarily by com-
pilers that wish to perform automatic parallel  decomposition  of
programs.  Further, we discuss why the current pthreads interface
is inadequate for this support, the required  characteristics  of
an  implementation  supporting  fine-grain parallelism, and a new
compiler-visible interface and implementation architecture.

Nawaf Bitar is a Member of the Technical Staff at Kubota  Pacific
Computer.   He is currently working on developing a threads model
and implementation suitable for applications requiring very  fine
grain parallelism granularity.  Prior to joining KPC he worked on
Mach-based systems at HP, OSF and Apollo.

FIRST TIME OFFERED!
M7
UNIX POWER TOOLS - GETTING THE MOST OUT OF UNIX
Rob Kolstad, Berkeley Software Design, Inc

Intended Audience:  Programmers, managers, and system administra-
tors  wanting  to learn more about the powerful development tools
available on UNIX.

This tutorial reveals the powerful tools available  in  UNIX  for
bringing applications to rapid deployment and products to market.
The primary goal is to make the attendee aware  of  many  of  the
many  electronic assistants the application developer can employ.
It also discusses issues  of  support,  maintenance,  and  future
development.   It touches as well upon legal issues of licensing,
liability, and protection.

The tutorial covers:

%       Rapid prototyping
                - Perl
                - Lex and yacc
                - Tcl and Tk
                - Centerline products
%       Source and object management
                - Make and Imake
%       File layout
                - Tags (editor comments)
                - File hierarchies
%       Version management & revision control
                - RCS
                - CVS
                - Group communication mechanisms
%       Portability and Cross-Architecture Support
                - Lint
                - Programming for readability P Tindent
                - Standardization
%       Maintenance
                - Patch
%       Distribution
                - CD/ROM
                - Other media
%       Protecting yourself
                - Patents, Copyrights, and Licenses
                - Software license servers
                - Copy protection and encryption

Dr. Rob Kolstad is Program Manager at Berkeley  Software  Design,
Inc.   Until recently he led development of Sun Microsystems' new
Backup Copilot product.  Rob sponsored the  first  USENIX  System
Administrators  Workshop,  and  recently  resigned  his tenure as
secretary of the USENIX Board of Directors.

FIRST TIME OFFERED!
1/2 day:  9:00 am - 12:30 pm (includes lunch at 12:30 pm)
M8
SECURITY AND THE X WINDOW SYSTEM
Jeremy Epstein, TRW and Rita Pascale, ORA Corporation

Intended Audience:  System administrators who want to  understand
measures  they  can  take  to protect their systems, managers who
want to understand the risks and available  solutions,  and  pro-
grammers who want to use securityenhanced X systems.  No previous
experience with security is required.  Some experience using X is
desirable, but not required.

As the X Window System increases in popularity  so  does  concern
about  its security.  Some of the risks (such as weak authentica-
tion) are well known.  Others are not.  Vendors are slowly moving
forward  in addressing the risks.  X is an open, resource-sharing
system, and security measures are not easily retrofitted  without
damaging  interoperability.   While measures can be taken (beyond
basic authentication), there are no quick and simple  answers  to
security in X.

This course explains the security risks involved in using X, some
of  the solutions currently available, and others expected in the
future.  Topics include threats, current technologies,  authenti-
cation,  access controls, auditing, privilege, and denial of ser-
vice.  Use of authentication mechanisms is described  in  detail,
including  xhost,  MIT  magic cookies, Sun's Secure RPC, and Ker-
beros.  Vendor-specific extensions to X for  access  control  and
privilege  are  presented.  Alternate architectures are described
for multi-level secure X systems.

Jeremy Epstein is a researcher in highly trusted  windowing  sys-
tems  at TRW.  He has written nine papers on the subject of X and
security.  Prior to joining TRW, he developed trusted  UNIX  sys-
tems  for Addamax.  Jeremy holds  an MS CS from Purdue University
and is pursuing a PhD in  Computer  Security  from  George  Mason
University.

Rita Pascale is a researcher in highly trusted  distributed  sys-
tems  at  ORA Corporation.  Until recently, she worked on trusted
windowing systems at TRW.  She is the author or co-author of four
papers on X and security.  Rita holds a BS CS from Virginia Tech.

FIRST TIME OFFERED!
1/2 day:  9 am - 12:30 pm (includes lunch at 12:30 pm)
M9
TOPICS IN SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION - 1
Trent Hein, XOR Computer Systems and Evi Nemeth, University of Colorado,
Boulder

Intended Audience:  System administrators who have a year or more
experience  and  wish  to learn state-of-the-art information sur-
rounding the broad area of administration.

This half-day tutorial is presented in four sections:

Routing - This section provides background  material  on  routing
both  in  a  local  area  network  and in the global Internet, in
preparation for learning  about  configuring  dedicated  routers.
The  section  covers  the  use  and setup of routed and gated for
medium sized networks and debugging using ping,  traceroute,  and
tcpdump .

Configuring Cisco Routers - You've probably seen the router  box.
And  you've  probably sent packets through it.  But you've always
wondered how to configure this essential part  of  your  network.
We'll  talk  specifics  about  configuring  Cisco  routers in the
TCP/IP environment, including various routing protocols  and  ac-
cess control lists.

SLIP - SLIP is the serial line IP protocol that can  be  used  to
connect  to  a  TCP/IP  network  via voice grade telephone lines.
This section shows how to get, use, and install SLIP including an
example of the necessary kernel reconfiguration on SunOS 4.x.

Modems - Using SLIP requires good modems at either  end  of  that
voice  grade  phone line.  This section reviews modern modems and
their capabilities.  Also included are the  configuration  needed
to use modems for SLIP.

Trent Hein grew up in the UNIX system administration trenches  at
the  University  of  Colorado,  Boulder.  He spent Summer 1990 at
Berkeley working on the 4.4BSD port to the MIPS architecture.  He
currently  works  as  a consultant for XOR Network Engineering in
Colorado.

Evi Nemeth, a faculty member in Computer Science at the Universi-
ty  of  Colorado, has managed UNIX systems for the past 15 years,
both from the front lines and from the ivory tower.  She  is  co-
author  of  the  best-selling UNIX System Administration Handbook
(Prentice-Hall).

1/2 day:  1:30 pm - 5 pm (includes lunch at 12:30 pm)
M10
MANAGING THE DOMAIN NAME SYSTEM
William LeFebvre, Northwestern University

Intended Audience:  Internet network managers who need  to  grasp
the  intricacies of managing the Domain Name System (DNS). Atten-
dees should have a basic understanding of Internet Protocols  and
a user's understanding of DNS.  They should also be familiar with
number bases, bits, bytes, and  machine  representations  of  in-
tegers, but need not be sophisticated programmers.

This half-day tutorial explains how to  administer  the  Internet
Domain  Name  System on a UNIX machine.  It details the operation
of named and the resolver library, primary and secondary servers,
the  format  of  DNS  zone files, installation of the entire bind
package, and configuration and control of the named daemon.  Time
will be made for a question-and-answer session.

William LeFebvre received his MS in Computer  Science  from  Rice
University.  He is currently the manager and analyst for the com-
puting facilities of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sci-
ence  Department at Northwestern University.  William serves as a
director for the Sun User Group.  He is also well  known  in  the
network  community for moderating the electronic digest Sun-Spots
from 1987 to 1989, and for founding the electronic  mailing  list
Sun-managers (which he still maintains).

FIRST TIME OFFERED!
1/2 day:  1:30 pm - 5 pm (includes lunch at 12:30 pm)
M11
TOPICS IN SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION - 2
Trent Hein, XOR Computer Systems and Evi Nemeth, University of Colorado,
Boulder

Intended Audience:  System administrators who have a year or more
experience  and  wish  to learn state-of-the-art information sur-
rounding the broad area of administration.  The morning  tutorial
Topics in System Administration-1 is not prerequisite to Part 2.

Administering DOS-based PCs in a TCP/IP  environment  -  Are  you
faced  with  integrating  DOS  PCs into your network environment?
This section covers available options and configuration specifics
of  setting  up  and administering PCs using both FTP's PCTCP and
Sun's PCNFS products to  do  email,  printing,  filesharing,  and
more.   PCs  under  TCP/IP can be your friend, if you know how to
keep them happy.

Network Wiring - Connection hardware and raw media  have  changed
since  the early days of thick coaxial cable for Ethernet.  We'll
cover modern media, twisted pair concentrators,  FDDI  and  CDDI,
ATM networks and some of the issues faced by sites needing to up-
grade their network base.

Intro to expect - Perhaps the greatest system administration tool
to  come  along  since PERL, expect is a high-powered interpreted
dialogue language which can act like your hands on  the  keyboard
to  perform  tricky  tasks  while you're away, asleep or at play.
We'll talk about the basic constructs of the language  and  write
some sample programs.

Evi Nemeth, a faculty member in Computer Science at the Universi-
ty  of  Colorado, has managed UNIX systems for the past 15 years,
both from the front lines and from the ivory tower.  She  is  co-
author  of  the  best-selling UNIX System Administration Handbook
(Prentice-Hall).

Trent Hein grew up in the UNIX system administration trenches  at
the  University  of  Colorado,  Boulder.  He spent Summer 1990 at
Berkeley working on the 4.4BSD port to the MIPS architecture.  He
currently  works  as  a consultant for XOR Network Engineering in
Colorado.

TUESDAY, JUNE 22
9:00 am - 5:00 pm (includes box lunch)

T1
SYMMETRIC MULTIPROCESSING AND CACHING IN UNIX KERNELS
Curt Schimmel, Consultant

Intended Audience:  Targeted to system programmers with 6  months
or  more  of  UNIX  kernel internals experience, this tutorial is
ideally suited for those who will be porting the UNIX kernel to a
modern computer architecture in the future, those involved in the
design of new computer architectures that  need  to  support  the
UNIX  operating  system  effectively  or  for anyone who wants to
learn more about operating systems and modern computer  architec-
tures.

This intensive tutorial presents the issues involved with porting
the  UNIX  operating system to modern computer architectures. At-
tendees will gain an understanding of the  design  considerations
modern  architectures present to the operating system and insight
into the design of new architectures intended to support the UNIX
operating  system.   Examples  of  modern RISC processors and the
computer systems built around them are  used  to  illustrate  the
concepts.

The first section of the tutorial  investigates  the  effects  of
various  cache  memory systems on the UNIX kernel. After an over-
view of cache system architecture is  presented,  four  different
cache  organizations  ranging  from pure virtual to pure physical
caches are studied including the tradeoffs of each, the impact on
the  kernel, and how to modify the kernel to properly control the
cache.

The second section presents tightly coupled, symmetric  multipro-
cessors.   This  includes  a  discussion of the mutual exclusion,
synchronization, race conditions, and deadlock problems  as  they
apply  to  the  UNIX kernel.  Several strategies for adapting the
UNIX kernel to run on a multiprocessor are then presented,  rang-
ing  from  master/slave  to  multithreaded  semaphore techniques,
along with the tradeoffs of each approach.

The third section builds upon the first two  by  examining  cache
consistency  in a multiprocessor system.  An understanding of the
cache consistency problems and  the  effects  on  the  kernel  is
gained followed by an investigation of both hardware and software
cache consistency algorithms for  different  cache  organizations
and multiprocessor kernel implementations.

The final section presents the differences  between  RISC  Memory
Management Units and more traditional style MMU's.  This includes
Translation Lookaside Buffer  (TLB)  management,  referenced  and
modified  bit  handling,  and  TLB flushing and replacement tech-
niques.  Emphasis is placed on the effects on the kernel and  the
algorithmic changes needed.

*This tutorial has been previously offered by the USENIX Associa-
tion with the title "UNIX on Modern Architectures."

Curt Schimmel is an Operating System Architect at Silicon  Graph-
ics,  Inc.   He  received  his  MS  in  Computer Science from the
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.  He has worked in many areas of
UNIX  kernel  development  and  computer  architecture on systems
ranging from microprocessors  to  multiprocessor  supercomputers.
He has worked extensively in the areas of multiprocessor systems,
virtual memory, real-time, process management, and the design  of
new CPU and cache system architectures.

FIRST TIME OFFERED!
T2
THE DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING ENVIRONMENT REMOTE PROCEDURE CALL SYSTEM
(DCE RPC)
Richard Mackey, Open Software Foundation

Intended Audience: Application programmers who want to write dis-
tributed  applications  using  remote  procedure calls.  No prior
knowledge about distributed computing is assumed.  A knowledge of
general networking issues will be helpful.

This tutorial gives attendees a strong overall sense of what  the
Distributed Computing Environment Remote Procedure Call (DCE RPC)
system is and how one writes applications using it.  The tutorial
describes the general structure of DCE RPC - the Interface Defin-
ition Language (IDL) and DCE RPC's application programming inter-
face  (API).   Next it describes how DCE RPC is used to build ap-
plications.  We then examine the relationship between DCE RPC and
DCE's Directory (naming) and Security (authentication and author-
ization) services.

The DCE RPC system is a framework for building distributed appli-
cations in a heterogeneous computing environment.  It allows pro-
grams to "call" subroutines that run on remote systems.  DCE  RPC
runs  on  a variety of UNIX and other systems.  Also known as NCS
2.0, DCE RPC is the successor  to  Hewlett-Packard  Apollo's  NCS
1.5.   DCE  RPC was developed jointly by HP and Digital Equipment
Corporation.  The entire DCE is licensed in source  form  by  the
Open  Software  Foundation  and  is available in binary form from
various vendors.

Richard Mackey, a consulting engineer at the Open Software  Foun-
dation,  is  a technical project leader and architect for the DCE
Release 1.1 project, and has been working on DCE since its incep-
tion.   Prior to joining OSF, he worked on the Cronus Distributed
Computing Environment project at BBN in Cambridge, MA.

FIRST TIME OFFERED!
T3
SENDMAIL:  INSIDE AND OUT
Eric Allman, University of California, Berkeley

Intended Audience: This is an  intense,  fast-paced  tutorial.for
system  administrators  who want to learn more about the sendmail
program, particularly details of the configuration file, for pro-
grammers implementing new mail front-ends who want to know exact-
ly what sendmail can do for them, and for curious people who want
to know what sendmail is all about.

Sendmail is arguably the most successful UNIX-based mail transfer
agent in the world today.  Originally distributed with the Berke-
ley Software Distribution, sendmail is now used by most UNIX ven-
dors.   However,  it has a reputation for being difficult to con-
figure and manage.

This talk uses the latest release of sendmail from Berkeley (ver-
sion  6)  for  examples.   Version 6 includes many of the popular
features of IDA sendmail.  Other versions of  sendmail  are  dis-
cussed  briefly.   This  tutorial  does not cover mail front-ends
beyond their interface to sendmail.

After introducing a bit of the philosophy and history  underlying
sendmail, we focus on these areas:
%  The syntactic elements of the configuration file: mailers, options,
   macros, classes, headers, precedences and priorities, trusted users,
   key file definitions, and rewriting rules and rulesets.
%  The flow and semantics of rulesets, including hints about debugging.
%  An introduction to SMTP, how sendmail operates in an SMTP
   environment, and SMTP interactions with UUCP.
%  Day-to-day management issues, including alias and forwarding files,
   special recipients (files, programs, and include files), mailing
   lists, command line flags, tuning, and security.
%  How sendmail interacts with the Domain Name Server.
%  Interfacing sendmail to new mail agents.

Eric Allman is the original author of sendmail, several other perennial
favorites including syslog, the -me macros, and trek, as well as being
a major contributor to INGRES.  He received his MS in Computer Science
from U.C. Berkeley in 1980.  He is currently the Lead Programmer on
the Mammoth Project at U.C. Berkeley, where his duties include most
everything that needs doing.

T4
UNIX NETWORK PROGRAMMING
Richard Stevens, Consultant

Intended Audience:  UNIX/C programmers interested in learning how
to  write  programs  that  communicate across a network.  A basic
familiarity with networking concepts and the TCP/IP protocols  is
assumed.

The goal of the tutorial is to provide the  programmer  with  the
knowledge  required  to write network programs and to develop and
examine actual examples.

The tutorial covers the following material:
 %   Introduction (5%). The  big  picture, standards, UNIX process
     handling,connections and associations.
%    Berkeley  sockets (80%).  All the socket functions, TCP and
     UDP client-server examples, reserved ports, stream  pipes,
     passing  file  descriptors, multiplexed  I/O,  out-of-band
     data,  raw sockets (ping and traceroute programs), broadcasting,
     inetd  superserver, constructing Internet  addresses,  and
      possible  socket  changes with 4.4BSD.
%    Remote procedure calls (15%).  Sun RPC,  comparison  with
     HP/Apollo RPC.

Richard Stevens is author of the books  Advanced  Programming  in
the  UNIX Environment (1992) and UNIX Network Programming (1990).
He received his PhD in the area  of  image  processing  from  the
University  of  Arizona.   From  1982  until  1990  he  was Vice-
President of Research and Development with Health Systems  Inter-
national.   Currently  he is an author and independent consultant
residing in Tucson, Arizona.

T5
UNIX SVR4.2 INTERNALS, PART 2: FILE SYSTEMS, I/O AND STREAMS
John R. Levine, Institute for Advanced Professional Studies

Intended Audience:  Those who maintain, modify, or port the  UNIX
system,  as well as those interested in its internal structure so
as to better understand how to construct efficient  and  portable
applications.  Attendees  should  have a working familiarity with
UNIX programming at the system call level and  with  the  ANSI  C
language.   Part 1 of this tutorial on Monday is not prerequisite
for Part 2.

We present an overview of the structure of the  system  with  em-
phasis on aspects new in SVR4.2.  Topics include the overall sys-
tem structure and the ways in which the  various  subsystems  fit
into  and  support that structure, along with the internal inter-
faces that make SVR4.2 more  extensible  than  its  predecessors.
The second day concentrates on:

File Systems: The virtual file system (VFS) interface generalizes
the  traditional  UNIX  file system to support multiple disk file
formats as well as remote file systems such as  NFS  and  pseudo-
files  such as the /proc debugger interface and the STREAMS-based
pipes.  We look at the structure of VFS and some of the  specific
file systems that interface to it.

Block and Character I/O: The traditional block and character I/.O
continue to be the primary interfaces to device drivers.  We look
at these interfaces along with new features such  as  installable
drivers and mappable device memory.

STREAMS: The STREAMS subsystem is a general and modular  facility
for modular non-disk device drivers.  We look at the basic struc-
ture of STREAMS, and how it supports terminal and network facili-
ties.

John R. Levine has been writing,  lecturing,  and  consulting  on
UNIX  topics  since  1975.  As a member of the IAPS staff, he has
frequently lectured on UNIS system internals.   His  books  range
from  Graphics  File  Formats  to  UNIX  for  Dummies.   He  also
moderates the usenet  comp.compilers  interest  group  and  edits
several series of technical computer books.

FIRST TIME OFFERED!
T6
THE WINDOWS NT ARCHITECTURE
Ted Demopoulos, Demopoulos Associates

Intended Audience: People who want to learn  about  the  internal
architecture  of  Windows  NT.  Knowledge of very basic operating
system principles, such as  the  nature  of  virtual  memory  and
processes,  is  assumed.   Familiarity  with  the  internals of a
modern operating system, such as UNIX or VMS, is helpful although
not necessary.

Windows NT is a new portable operating system with features  that
until  recently  were found mainly in research operating systems.
It currently runs on Intel, Mips, and DEC's Alpha architectures.

Attendees will gain an understanding of the goals,  the  philoso-
phy,  and  structure of Windows NT.  The components of Windows NT
and how they work together to accomplish these goals are present-
ed.   The  tutorial concludes with a brief introduction to future
enhancements to NT, collectively code named RCairo.S Tutorial to-
pics include:

%       The NT Kernel,
%       The Object Manager,
%       VM,
%       I/O,
%       Networking,
%       Protected Subsystems.

Ted Demopoulos is the president of Demopoulos Associates, a  con-
sulting  company  specializing in open systems education and con-
sulting.  He holds an MS  in  Theoretical  Mathematics  from  the
University of New Hampshire.  Ted was employed by Apollo Computer
and Hewlett-Packard where he worked with distributed technologies
for  five  years.   Lately he has been serving as a consultant to
the Open Software Foundation on distributed and operating  system
technologies.   He  has  followed  the  development of Windows NT
since its announcement and has been working with Windows NT since
Microsoft's pre-beta release last summer.

FIRST TIME OFFERED!
T7
ACHIEVING SECURITY IN AN INTERNET ENVIRONMENT
Rob Kolstad, Berkeley Software Design, Inc and Tina Darmohray, Lawrence
Livermore National Laboratory

Intended Audience: Valuable for system  administrators,  program-
mers, technical and operational managers, and all interested pro-
fessionals involved in securing computer networks  and/or  inter-
network  gateways.   Previous  exposure  to  TCP/IP networks is a
prerequisite.

Often, the success of an enterprise depends  heavily  on  digital
communications.   Until now, the techniques and tools required to
secure a functional TCP/IP network have been an  art  -  acquired
only  through trial and error.  This tutorial presents issues and
solutions surrounding the  securing  of  functional  internetwork
connections.   This  tutorial  is  oriented more toward UNIX than
other systems like VMS and VM.

The tutorial reviews the building blocks of distributed  filesys-
tems,  sendmail  configuration, the Post Office Protocol, and In-
ternet connections.  It then integrates the  building  blocks  to
show  how  to construct an Internet firewall to connect your net-
work to the Internet, while  isolating  and  mitigating  security
problems.   We conclude with a discussion of ethics and the kinds
of policies that can smooth the running of your networked site.

Topics include:
%       Distributed Filesystems
%       Sendmail
%       Post Office Protocol
%       Connecting to the Internet
%       Firewalls
                - Routers
                - Gateway Hosts
                - Proxy Users
                - DNS
                - Mail
%       Ethics
%       Internet Debugging
%       Security Policies

Tina Darmohray has over a decade of experience as a  UNIX  system
administrator.   She  is the Lead for the UNIX System Administra-
tion Team at LLNL.  Her group has responsibility for  over  1,000
machines.   In 1990, she installed the first firewall at LLNL and
has since consulted with a number of sites in the Bay Area.  Pre-
viously, she worked for Sun Microsystems.  She received her MS at
the University of California,  Berkeley.

Dr. Rob Kolstad is Program Manager at Berkeley  Software  Design,
Inc.   Until recently he led development of Sun Microsystems' new
Backup Copilot product.  Rob sponsored the  first  USENIX  System
Administrators  Workshop,  and  recently  resigned  his tenure as
secretary of the USENIX Board of Directors.

T8
TCL AND TK: A NEW APPROACH TO X11 AND GUI PROGRAMMING
John Ousterhout, University of California, Berkeley

Intended Audience:  People who wish to learn how to write scripts
for existing applications built with Tcl and Tk or who would like
to build new graphical-user-interface applications based  on  Tcl
and Tk.  Prior experience with Tcl and Tk is not necessary nor is
detailed knowledge of any existing X toolkit.  Please be familiar
with  the  C  programming language and have basic knowledge about
the X Window System.

Creating good graphical user interfaces for the X  Window  System
is  notoriously  hard.   With  traditional tools you have to read
thousands of pages of documentation and write thousands of  lines
of  code  to  build even the simplest application.  Tcl (a shell-
like scripting language) and Tk (an X11  toolkit  and  Motif-like
widget set based on Tcl) offer an alternative approach.  With Tcl
and Tk you program GUI applications  in  a  high-level  scripting
language  with a much simpler model of the X world.  As a result,
applications can be built with less learning time and an order of
magnitude  less  code than with other toolkits.  The Tcl language
is interpretive so you can also program and  extend  applications
at  run-time.   Different  applications can issue Tcl commands to
each other in order to work together in interesting  ways.   This
gives  Tcl and Tk greater power and flexibility than other toolk-
its.  Lastly, you can extend the facilities  of  Tcl  and  Tk  by
writing  C  code where it is needed, so there is no loss of func-
tionality or performance.

The course provides a complete top to  bottom  introduction  to
Tcl  and Tk.  First, we offer an overview of Tcl and Tk and their
benefits.  Then the Tcl scripting language is  described  in  de-
tail,  including  its syntax and the most commonly used commands.
Thirdly, we discuss how to  program  the  Tk  toolkit  using  Tcl
scripts.   We  cover the major features provided by Tk, including
widgets, geometry managers, and  communication  between  applica-
tions.   Next, we describe how to write C code that interfaces to
Tcl and, in particular, how to build new Tcl commands with C pro-
cedures.   Finally,  we  describe  how  to  build new widgets and
geometry managers by writing C code that interfaces to  Tk.   The
course  contains  numerous  examples of scripts and C programs to
illustrate the capabilities of the system.

John Ousterhout is a Professor in the  Department  of  Electrical
Engineering  and  Computer Sciences at the University of Califor-
nia, Berkeley and the author of both Tcl and Tk.   His  interests
include  user interfaces, operating systems, and distributed sys-
tems.  Ousterhout is a recipient of the ACM Grace  Murray  Hopper
Award,  the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Inves-
tigator Award, the National Academy of Sciences Award for Initia-
tives  in  Research,  the IEEE Browder J. Thompson Award, and the
U.C. Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award.  He received a PhD in
Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1980.

FIRST TIME OFFERED!
T9
INSTALLING, CONFIGURING AND ADMINISTERING X SYSTEMS
Paul E. Kimball, Consultant

Intended Audience:  System administrators or interested users who
are  building or maintaining X-based application environments.  A
conversational familiarity with windowing environments  and  net-
working concepts is assumed.  X programming experience is helpful
but not necessary.

Now that low-cost X terminals and inexpensive X workstations  are
widely  available,  more  and more system managers are faced with
having to support X networks.   It's  a  challenge:   users  want
their  workstations  installed and customized, programmers demand
the latest development libraries, and through  it  all,  security
and  performance  must  be maintained.  Since X systems depend on
the close cooperation of numerous separate  software  components,
troubleshooting  problems is also more challenging than in monol-
ithic systems.

This tutorial covers the practical  essentials  of  administering
and maintaining large networks of X workstations and X terminals.
From this course you will learn:
%       How to obtain, install and build the X distribution
%       How to start and configure the X server on workstations
%       How to install and set up X terminals
%       How X login sessions are started and controlled
%       How to maintain security in X networks
%       How to manage and install fonts and font servers
%       How to customize the user's graphic environment
%       How OPEN LOOK, OSF/Motif and other user interfaces fit
          in the X environment
%       How to cope with vendor-specific X features
%       How software is distributed and licensed in a heterogeneous
          X network
%       How to maintain optimum performance in X networks
%       How to troubleshoot common X problems
%       Which files to edit to control an X system

Paul E. Kimball is the manager of technical support  for  Digital
Equipment  Corporation's  Independent  Software  Vendor  Group in
Mountain View, CA.  There he works with a team of  engineers  as-
sisting software developers in porting to Open Systems.  Mr. Kim-
ball has 15 years of experience in graphics, window  systems  and
user-interface  toolkits,.  He is a frequent speaker at UniForum,
Xhibition, X World, UKUUG and other UNIX and X  events.   He  has
been  working and teaching with X and X Toolkits since 1986.  Mr.
Kimball holds Engineering degrees from MIT and Princeton  Univer-
sity.

*****************************************************************

For more information contact:

USENIX Association
Conference Office
22672 Lambert St., Suite 613
Lake Forest, CA  92630
Telephone (714) 588-8649
FAX: (714) 588-9706