DNS question

DNS question

Post by Kurt J. Lanz » Tue, 21 Oct 1997 04:00:00




> Say you've got two domains, A & B.  You've got a bunch of clients on the B
> domain that need to connect to clients in the A domain. Is it possilbe to
> just have the B's domain DNS secondary the A's domain DNS?  Will that work?
>  In other words:

> A Domain client         B Domain client

> whoever.A.COM           whatever.B.COM

> Can 'whatever' attempt to connect to 'whoever' by just typing say, "telnet
> whoever"?  Will 'whoever' get resolved at the B domain dns?
> (Who's on first anyone?)

> Just wondering,

Err.... No, if I understand your question. Being "secondary" to another
DNS server does not mean "I will meld your domain with mine". It means
"I  will occasionally download your domain to myself". So one would
still have to "telnet whoever.a.com", but the DNS lookup would be
faster. Hope this helps.
--
Kurt J. Lanza

 
 
 

DNS question

Post by Michael G. Beir » Tue, 21 Oct 1997 04:00:00




>Say you've got two domains, A & B.  You've got a bunch of clients on the B
>domain that need to connect to clients in the A domain. Is it possilbe to
>just have the B's domain DNS secondary the A's domain DNS?  Will that work?
> In other words:

>A Domain client             B Domain client

>whoever.A.COM               whatever.B.COM

>Can 'whatever' attempt to connect to 'whoever' by just typing say, "telnet
>whoever"?  Will 'whoever' get resolved at the B domain dns?
>(Who's on first anyone?)

Not unless you put duplicate entries in your DNS for whoever.B.COM with
the same IP address as whoever.A.com.  You could put entries for
whoever.A.COM into your hosts NIS map or /etc/hosts file if your
system supports some type of hosts resolution sequence too.
Of course "A.com" would then have to inform you whenever they changed
any IP address that your clients used. This defeats the original purpose
of DNS, which was to distribute name -> IP address and IP address -> name
resolution.

The nameservers for B.COM could secondary the A.COM addresses, but
that still would require using "whoever.A.COM" instead of just
"whoever". "Secondary" means make a full copy and do name resolution
for this domain just like the primary.  You can even point secondaries
to other secondaries and it will work, although it will take more
time before any change in the primary gets propagated.
Most versions of BIND have some form of caching that is used first, before
any remote DNS server is contacted.  This can speed up lookups quite
a bit for things that are frequently looked up.

--
Michael G. Beirne | 3250 N Wolcott #2, Chicago,IL 60657-2053, (773)348-8438


 
 
 

DNS question

Post by Jesse River » Tue, 21 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Say you've got two domains, A & B.  You've got a bunch of clients on the B
domain that need to connect to clients in the A domain. Is it possilbe to
just have the B's domain DNS secondary the A's domain DNS?  Will that work?
 In other words:

A Domain client         B Domain client

whoever.A.COM           whatever.B.COM

Can 'whatever' attempt to connect to 'whoever' by just typing say, "telnet
whoever"?  Will 'whoever' get resolved at the B domain dns?
(Who's on first anyone?)

Just wondering,

-Jesse

 
 
 

DNS question

Post by Barry Margoli » Tue, 21 Oct 1997 04:00:00




>A Domain client             B Domain client

>whoever.A.COM               whatever.B.COM

>Can 'whatever' attempt to connect to 'whoever' by just typing say, "telnet
>whoever"?  Will 'whoever' get resolved at the B domain dns?

I think what you want is the "search" directive in /etc/resolv.conf.  On
the A machines put:

search a.com b.com

On the B machines put:

search b.com a.com

--

GTE Internetworking, Powered by BBN, Cambridge, MA
Support the anti-spam movement; see <http://www.cauce.org/>
Please don't send technical questions directly to me, post them to newsgroups.

 
 
 

DNS question

Post by Ted » Wed, 22 Oct 1997 04:00:00



> Say you've got two domains, A & B.  You've got a bunch of clients on the B
> domain that need to connect to clients in the A domain. Is it possilbe to
> just have the B's domain DNS secondary the A's domain DNS?  Will that work?
>  In other words:

> A Domain client         B Domain client

> whoever.A.COM           whatever.B.COM

> Can 'whatever' attempt to connect to 'whoever' by just typing say, "telnet
> whoever"?  Will 'whoever' get resolved at the B domain dns?
> (Who's on first anyone?)

> Just wondering,

> -Jesse


Call me crazy, but can't you just modify your /etc/resolv.conf file and
enter something to the effect of

search  A.COM B.COM foo.net bar.org anyotherdomain.com  
nameserver 127.0.0.1

And then it will resolve the whoever or whatever on either server since
it will look in each domain by default. Or are you looking for something
more then that?

--
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Linux.


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DNS question

Post by William LeFebv » Thu, 23 Oct 1997 04:00:00




>Say you've got two domains, A & B.  You've got a bunch of clients on the B
>domain that need to connect to clients in the A domain. Is it possilbe to
>just have the B's domain DNS secondary the A's domain DNS?  Will that work?
> In other words:

>A Domain client             B Domain client

>whoever.A.COM               whatever.B.COM

>Can 'whatever' attempt to connect to 'whoever' by just typing say, "telnet
>whoever"?  Will 'whoever' get resolved at the B domain dns?
>(Who's on first anyone?)

Well, you're asking two different and unrelated questions.  A DNS
server will act as "secondary" for a domain by transferring all the
records and answering queries for that domain.  But it in no way mixes
those records with those of any primary domain it may be serving.

I think what you want is the ability for the DNS lookup process to
consult more than one domain space for an abbreviated name.  So that
the name "fubar" would be searched first in "a.com" and then in
"b.com".  Is that correct?

Some name resolver libraries support this through a directive in
/etc/resolv.conf called "search":

        search a.com b.com

The domains will be consulted in the order listed.

However, not all Unix variants have a version of the name resolver
which supports this (i.e.: Solaris and SunOS do not support this...
although I haven't checked 2.6).  If you're stuck on such a machine
your only option is to replace the resolver library with the most
up-to-date one from the BIND distribution (www.isc.org).  

--
                                William LeFebvre
                                Group sys Consulting

                                +1 770 813 3224

 
 
 

DNS question

Post by cgon.. » Fri, 24 Oct 1997 04:00:00


The man pages from Solaris 2.6 show the search option

-craig

 
 
 

DNS question

Post by William LeFebv » Sat, 25 Oct 1997 04:00:00



>The man pages from Solaris 2.6 show the search option

On my Solaris 2.5.1 system I just did a strings on
/usr/lib/libresolv.so.2 (the one that was installed with the resolver
library patch).  It appears to contain the following resolv.conf
directives: domain, search, namesever, sortlist, options.  This
despite the documentation.  libresolv.so.1 also appears to have
the search directive but not sortlist and options.  I haven't
tested these to see if they actually behave as they should.

YMMV

--
                                William LeFebvre
                                Group sys Consulting

                                +1 770 813 3224

 
 
 

1. DNS Question

New to linux... sorry ;-)

I set up my first linux box. I have it serving web pages across my lan
(used for testing websites that I later post to a hosting service.) Also
have it set up as a printer server via samba/cups so I don't have to
leave my "main" windows xp box on all the time. So far so good.

Now I'd like to setup DNS... I think.

What I'd like to do is allow any user on the LAN (fixed machines and
visitor's laptops connected via 802.11g)  to simply type something like
"homesite" in their browser's address field and have that take them to
my little internal site where I will have information for setting up to
print to my printer, a link to the cups administration page to they can
see their print jobs, a link to my TurtleBeach AudioTrons (which stream
music off a central NAS), etc.

My initial look into this leads me to believe I need to set the linux
box up as a DNS. I would intercept the "homesite" request and return the
ip address of my LAN website. All other requests would get forwarded to
my ISP's DNS.

Is that right?

Of course... this would require the user to tell their OS about this DNS
instead of the default they get from my wireless router. Which leads me
to wonder... how do hotels and hotspots do it? In those cases, when I
connect wirelessly, regardless of the address I try to browse to, they
direct me to a "sign in page" or the like, and don't allow me to connect
to other addresses until I take some action (e.g. accept usage terms,
enter account info, etc.)

Anyone know how that works? Anyone have any links to info?

Thanks,
Buzz

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