what is the latest version of UNIX right now?

what is the latest version of UNIX right now?

Post by wth » Sun, 13 Apr 1997 04:00:00



my college is using 'System V' version of UNIX...
how old was this?
how about HP-UX?
why is there so many versions of UNIX out there?
what are all these :
   System IV, System V, HP-UX, BSD UNIX, XENIX, LINUX, XXXXXXX.....

I am confuse with all these.....
Any good resources for me!!!

what is the latest version of UNIX right now?

 
 
 

what is the latest version of UNIX right now?

Post by Trever Mill » Mon, 14 Apr 1997 04:00:00


: what is the latest version of UNIX right now?

That is like asking "What is the latest version of Car, right now?"

--

                                 http://www.nucleus.com/~millertr/ab-b5/

"The stupider it looks, the more important it probably is." -- J.R. 'Bob' Dobbs

 
 
 

what is the latest version of UNIX right now?

Post by Jim Denn » Tue, 15 Apr 1997 04:00:00


wth (wth...@pl.jaring.my) wrote:

: my college is using 'System V' version of UNIX...
: how old was this?

        Short answer:

        .... more than a quarter century.

        More details:

        SysV (or AT&T) and BSD are the two major families
        of Unix variants.  Most good books on Unix have a
        small summary of the history of Unix in the introduction,
        the first chapter or in some appendix.

                (I can't possibly do those histories justice
                -- see the end of this message for a better
                resource).

        There have been many versions and implementations of
        SysV -- most recent ones are SVR4 (release 4) --
        the most recent of those I think is SVR4.4.

        Coincidentally BSD is also at version 4.4.  However
        Several BSD derivatives that are based on BSD 4.4
        have different version numbers:

                BSDI/OS -- from Berkeley Design Systems Inc.
                        2.??
                FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD each have their
                        own version numbers.

        SunOS 4.1.4 is the latest version of Sun's BSD derived
        OS.  SunOS isn't being developed further -- only the
        occasional patch/fix released is made.

        Solaris is is Sun's AT&T derivative -- made only a few
        years ago as part of a major restructuring.  It is
        currently at version 2.51 or 2.6.

: how about HP-UX?

        HP-UX is HP's version of AT&T SysV.  It is currently
        at version 10.x (or is it 11.x).

: why is there so many versions of UNIX out there?

        Because there are so many different computer architectures
        out there -- and there are so many different ways to do
        the same basic thing on any given platform.

: what are all these :
:    System IV, System V, HP-UX, BSD UNIX, XENIX, LINUX, XXXXXX.....

        There is no Sys IV that I've ever heard of.  There was
        System 6 (never left AT&T's site so far as I know) and
        System 7 (about 20 years ago).

        We've already discussed System V (aka SysV or SVRx --
        where SVR3.2 and SVR4.4 are most common instances).

        BSD and all its derivatives (BSDI/OS (formerly BSD386),
                FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, 386/BSD (called Jolix by some))
                derive from a set of enhancements to an early AT&T
                Unix that were done by the Computer Science Research
                Group (CSRG) at the University of California,
                Berkeley campus.

                BSD offered the early implementations of the TCP/IP
                networking code and added the rsh, rcp and rlogin
                commands.  BSD stands for "Berkeley Software
                Distribution"

        Xenix was an early attempt by Microsoft to put Unix on
        IBM PC hardware.  It is, if I recall, derived from System 7
        sources -- as they were still small enough to run on a
        PC.  The very early Xenix ran on XT systems -- but most
        versions required a 286 or better.  

        Xenix was later acquired by or licensed to SCO (Santa Cruz
        Operations).  Microsoft owned a big chunk of SCO for a
        long time -- I don't know if they still do.

        SCO also produces the ODT (Open DeskTop) which is an
        SVR4 derivative.  They also now own UnixWare (formerly
        owned by Novell) and they hold the copyright to the
        original AT&T Unix Source code -- after it went through
        USL (Unix System Laboratories -- an organization spun
        off of or founded by AT&T and various Unix licensees) --
        and after Novell bought USL/Unix.

        Novell gave the trademark on the term "Unix" to X/Open
        -- an industry consortium.

        SCO's ownership is further diluted by the existence of
        several "perpetual and unlimited" licenses held by
        companies like Sun.

        Linux is an implementation of the POSIX specification
        which wasn't derived from any of the early source code.

        POSIX was an attempt by the U.S. federal government to
        create a standard for their purchasing/bid requirements.
        It resulted in a specification that could be met by
        operating systems such as VMS and MVS (both of which have
        POSIX subsystems or configurations).

        The Linux project was started by Linus Torvalds, then a
        student at the University of Helsinki in Finland.  He
        started it as an exercise to learn more about the low-level
        architecture of the Intel 386 chip -- and did his early work
        on Minix.

        Minix is a vaguely Unix like operating system written by
        Andrew S. Tannebaum -- to serve as an example for his
        classes and books on "Modern Operating Systems."  Minix
        is a "microkernel" design that has been ported to the
        XT and AT, and to Macs, Amigas, and a few other micros.

        Linux uses a "monolithic" (non-microkernel) design --
        although advances in loadable modules, and automatically
        loaded modules (kerneld) -- and the work by Apple Computers
        Inc to fund the development of mkLinux (Linux running over
        a CMU "Mach" microkernel) makes this an increasingly moot
        distinction.

        Strictly speaking Linux is just a kernel.  Linus Torvalds
        continues to manage the project accepting source code
        patches and new modules from basically anyone who wants
        to send in usable code.  He's completed his post-graduate
        work and has accepted a position with a start-up in the
        Silicon Valley, near San Francisco, California (where I
        live).

        In the broader sense "Linux" refers to any of the 40, 50,
        or larger number of "distributions" -- collections of software
        that are bundled with a Linux kernel.  If I wanted I could make
        a collection of my own -- put it on an FTP site, start burning
        CD's, give it a clever name.

        What is remarkable about Linux is that this anarchy is
        not only legal and acceptable to the copyright holders
        (Linus T. and hundreds of others) -- but is actually
        ENCOURAGED.  Some of the popular Linux distributions are:

                Red Hat, Slackware, Yggdrasil, Debian, and Caldera

        ... some of the more obscure or out-of-date are:

                MiniLinux, DILinux/DOSLinux, Nascent, Bogus,
                S.u.S.E., LaserMoon FT, SLS, TAMU, MCC Interim, etc.

        Oddly enough the FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD -- which
        all splintered from the work of Mr. and Mrs. Jolitz --
        called 386BSD -- have licensing terms that are at
        least as liberal (arguably more so).  Yet there are
        far fewer sources of these.  FreeBSD is readily
        available from Walnut Creek -- the largest publisher
        of CD software collections.  Walnut Creek uses FreeBSD
        as the server software for their FTP archives -- which is
        almost certainly the largest and probably the busiest on
        the Internet.

        NetBSD is the most portable of the free *BSD's -- and is
        available on PC, SPARC, Mac (68K), Amiga and other platforms.
        Linux is gaining in portability with ports in progress for
        MIPS, Alpha, SPARC, and Mac (PowerPC) platforms.

        Linux has been considerably more popular -- and gained
        considerably more media attention and notoriety -- than
        all the other "free" versions of Unix.  This results in
        considerable acrimony and fans the flamewars in all the
        related newsgroups.

        Despite all the haggling between proponents and enthusiasts
        of the Linux and *BSD groups there is considerable co-operation
        among them.  Just about any significant piece of free software
        that is written for any one of them is ported to all the others.

        There are *many* other Unix and Unix like operating
        systems -- at least 680 (this is the number to which
        the venerable C-Kermit -- Columbia University's
        communications software -- has been ported).  Some of
        those are:

                HURD:

                        This isn't ready for wide use yet.
                        It is the penultimate product of the
                        Free Software Foundation -- the
                        kernel for their GNU project.

                        It is worth noting that about 90% of
                        almost any Linux distribution is software
                        from the GNU project.  Some major components
                        from the *BSD groups are also FSF GNU
                        packages. (Notably the compiler!)

                        Richard Stallman, founder of the FSF,
                        embarked on this project a long time
                        ago (before Linus or the Jolitz' started
                        work on their projects).

                        His strategy was to create the best
                        set of utilities and tools first.  Make
                        those available on as many platforms as
                        possible.  Then use those to create a
                        kernel -- and thus create a complete
                        operating system that will be freely
                        distibutable.

                        (Some have argued that Linux/GNU has
                        already done this -- RMS and others
                        have argued that ... -- more acrimony
                        and debate -- but more co-operation
                        underneath it all, too)

                        HURD is based on the CMU (Carnegie
                        Mellon University) "Mach" microkernel.
                        (Yes, so is mkLinux -- mentioned ealier).

                Mach:

                        The Mach Microkernel is not a Unix
                        implementation.  It is an OS that allows
                        one to "emulate" or "implement" a variety
                        of OS API's (Applications Programming
                        Interfaces) to run concurrently on the
                        same system.

                        There are many Unix variants built over
                        Mach. A few are QNX, Mt. Xinu, Chorus, and
                        Tenon Systems' MachTen.

                MachTen:

                        One of the Unix variants for the Mac
                        (68K or PowerPC) platforms.  This was
                        for a long time the only commercial
                        competitor to Apple's A/UX unix derivative
                        for their Mac platform.

                NeXTStep:

                        This a Unix built over Mach with an
                        Object-oriented GUI built over that.

                        NeXT was founded by Steve Jobs after
                        he left Apple Computers (about a decade
                        ago).  Originally a hardware company --
                        NeXT later ported his OS to the PC
                        architecture where it became a small
                        but interesting niche.

                        Sun also licensed/ported a version of
                        NeXTStep which is called "OpenStep."

                        There is a project to create a free
                        distribution of OpenStep -- which is
                        called GNUStep.

                        Most people think of X Windows as the
                        only GUI for Unix.  This is really a
                        misnomer since X Windows is technically
                        a communications protocol -- which hosts
                        several GUI's including Motif and CDE and
                        which can support several graphical API's
                        including PeXlib, OpenGL and NeXTStep's
                        "Display Postscript."

                        Steve Jobs later became a multi-billionaire
                        -- largely from his investment and work with
                        Pixar -- the makers of "Toy Story."
                        Recently, Jobs has rejoined Apple Computers
                        and is engineering a major comeback effort
                        there.

                        As part of that deal Apple aquires NeXT
                        and will try to complete their "Copeland"
                        project -- which was a major
...

read more »

 
 
 

what is the latest version of UNIX right now?

Post by fu.. » Thu, 17 Apr 1997 04:00:00



Quote:>    Solaris is is Sun's AT&T derivative -- made only a few
>    years ago as part of a major restructuring.  It is
>    currently at version 2.51 or 2.6.

Actually, Solaris 2.6 is in late beta at this point.

--
                                   fugue
                "The police used to watch over the people.
                     Now they're watching the people."

 
 
 

what is the latest version of UNIX right now?

Post by Ian Crozie » Thu, 17 Apr 1997 04:00:00



>         SunOS 4.1.4 is the latest version of Sun's BSD derived
>         OS.  SunOS isn't being developed further -- only the
>         occasional patch/fix released is made.

>         Solaris is is Sun's AT&T derivative -- made only a few
>         years ago as part of a major restructuring.  It is
>         currently at version 2.51 or 2.6.

A Sun employee was adamant with me about the fact that Sun workstations
still run SunOS. Do a 'uname -a' on a "Solaris" workstation.
When I do, it says SunOS 5.5.
Solaris includes the latest SunOS plus other software e.g. Solaris 2.5
includes SunOs 5.5 and OpenWindows 3.5.
Admittedly, when they went from 4.X to 5.X, they switched from a BSD
version of unix to an AT&T version, but their operating system is still
called SunOS.
 
 
 

what is the latest version of UNIX right now?

Post by Tom Reingo » Wed, 23 Apr 1997 04:00:00



> A Sun employee was adamant with me about the fact that Sun workstations
> still run SunOS. Do a 'uname -a' on a "Solaris" workstation.
> When I do, it says SunOS 5.5.
> Solaris includes the latest SunOS plus other software e.g. Solaris 2.5
> includes SunOs 5.5 and OpenWindows 3.5.
> Admittedly, when they went from 4.X to 5.X, they switched from a BSD
> version of unix to an AT&T version, but their operating system is still
> called SunOS.

Not in the vernacular.  In other words, it depends on who does the
calling.
--
Tom Reingold, Bell Labs
Murray Hill, NJ, USA

 
 
 

what is the latest version of UNIX right now?

Post by Ian Crozie » Wed, 23 Apr 1997 04:00:00




> > A Sun employee was adamant with me about the fact that Sun workstations
> > still run SunOS. Do a 'uname -a' on a "Solaris" workstation.
> > When I do, it says SunOS 5.5.
> > Solaris includes the latest SunOS plus other software e.g. Solaris 2.5
> > includes SunOs 5.5 and OpenWindows 3.5.
> > Admittedly, when they went from 4.X to 5.X, they switched from a BSD
> > version of unix to an AT&T version, but their operating system is still
> > called SunOS.

> Not in the vernacular.  In other words, it depends on who does the
> calling.
> --
> Tom Reingold, Bell Labs
> Murray Hill, NJ, USA


Well, since you mention that. This Sun person also told me it wasn't my call
to make. So, if Sun say their OS is SunOS, then that's the final word, according to him.
 
 
 

what is the latest version of UNIX right now?

Post by The Nemasy » Thu, 24 Apr 1997 04:00:00



> Well, since you mention that. This Sun person also told me it wasn't my call
> to make. So, if Sun say their OS is SunOS, then that's the final word, according to him.

This is odd.  All of the recent Sun documentation that I have seen refers
to the older version as "Solaris 1.X (SunOS 4.X)".  
--
The Nemasys
Nemasys Technologies

http://www.mindspring.com/~nemasys
 
 
 

1. Q: How do I get from the latest stable kernel version to the latest prepatch version ?

Thanks.
It just struck me odd that the latest is 2.4.2 while the prepatches were
2.4.3 so I figured there must be something I missed in between (my logic
told me that a 2.4.3 patch would be against a 2.4.3 something ;-).

BTW, I haven't seen any announcements from Linus in this mailing list
regarding new versions, just the updates on the web site and Alan's release
notes saying he's merging with 2.4.3xx. Are those announcements being posted
somewhere else now ?

2. direcpc with freebsd????

3. This clone thing...am I stupid, or am I right?

4. changing content of ISO 9660 FS

5. Advice on Power Linux Kit

6. Am I touchy? Or am I right?

7. newbie question re:banshee

8. intel e1000 driver, why is the latest version 6.2.15 not in the latest kernel?

9. Latest Version Of LHA For Unix?

10. which xntp (solaris version or the latest version) should be used

11. Need Latest Version of Linux CD-ROM Version

12. buglet in xc version xc+rz (latest version)