Joint USENIX Symposia: Microkernels and other Kernel Architectures and Symposium on Distributed and Multiprocessor Systems

Joint USENIX Symposia: Microkernels and other Kernel Architectures and Symposium on Distributed and Multiprocessor Systems

Post by Carolyn Ca » Sun, 05 Sep 1993 03:29:48



                     JOINT USENIX SYMPOSIA:

           Microkernels and Other Kernel Architectures
                             and
Experiences  with  Distributed and Multiprocessor Systems (SEDMS IV*)

                     SEPTEMBER 20-23 1993
                HILTON BEACH AND TENNIS  RESORT
                     SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA

Sponsored by the USENIX Association in cooperation with:

The Software  Engineering  Research  Center
ACM  SIGARCH,  SIGCOMM,  SIGOPS and SIGSOFT
IEEE Computer Society Technical Committees on Distributed
Processing, Operating Systems, Software Engineering and
Design Automation

USENIX, the UNIX and advanced  computing  systems  technical  and
professional  association, invites you to attend our joint sympo-
sia being held in San Diego on September 20 - 23, 1993. Both sym-
posia are co-located at the same hotel.  The Microkernels program
will be presented on Monday and Tuesday, September 20 & 21,  fol-
lowed by SEDMS on Wednesday and Thursday, September 22 & 23.  One
registration fee is being offered to attend both meetings.

This article contains all the important  information  about  both
symposia,   including  tutorials,  technical  sessions,  symposia
registration and hotel information.

IMPORTANT SYMPOSIA DATES & SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Hotel  Reservation Deadline:   August  28,1993
Pre-Registration  Discount Deadline: September 13, 1993

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19
6:00pm - 9:00pm Registration/no host  reception

MONDAY,SEPTEMBER 20
7:30am - 5:00pm Symposia Registration
9:00am - 5:00pm Microkernel Tutorial Program

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER  21
7:30am  -  5:00pm  Symposia  Registration
8:30am  -  6:05pm Microkernel Technical Sessions

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22
7:30am  -  5:00pm  Symposia  Registration
9:00am - 5:30pm SEDMS Technical Sessions
6:00pm - 8:00pm Symposia Reception

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23
9:00am - 5:00pm SEDMS Technical Sessions

MICROKERNELS AND OTHER KERNEL ARCHITECTURES - SEPTEMBER 20 - 21

PROGRAM COMMITTEE
Lori S. Grob, Program  Chair,  Chorus  systemes
Brian  Bershad, Carnegie Mellon University
Michael L. Powell, Sun Microsystems Laboratories

Following the success of last year's Symposium, in which an over-
view  of microkernel-based systems was offered, we are pleased to
announce the Second USENIX Symposium on  Microkernels  and  Other
Kernel Architectures.

Aimed at exploring various approaches to microkernel  and  kernel
design, and the advantages and disadvantages of each, this Sympo-
sium will provide a look at the  evolution  of  microkernel-based
systems,  how  they  are being used today, and what their promise
might be  for  tomorrow.   A  particularly  interesting  question
raised  in the Symposium will be whether microkernel architecture
lends itself to the support of  new  kinds  of  applications  and
hardware architectures that might be difficult or even impossible
to support under other operating system models.

Other topics to be discussed at  the  Symposium  will  be  future
steps  in  operating system design; improving performance of dis-
tributed operating systems; the coexistence of different  operat-
ing  systems; the increased use of object-oriented operating sys-
tems; and the problems of providing real  time  performance  with
microkernels.

MICROKERNEL TUTORIAL PROGRAM
September 20, 1993

The USENIX tutorial program for this symposium  is  tailored  for
people  who would like an introduction to the state-of-the-art in
Microkernel technology, or for those who would like a  comparison
of  the  various design and implementation philosophies available
today.  All tutorials are a half  day  long,  and  attendees  may
choose  one  morning  and one afternoon tutorial.  A box lunch is
included with the registration fee.

Attendance in each tutorial class is limited, and on-site  regis-
tration will be allowed only if space permits.

AM 1 Tutorial:
Introduction to the Mach 3.0 Microkernel
9:00am - 12:30pm
Instructor: David Black, Open Software Foundation

This tutorial will provide a quick introduction to the  internals
of  Mach  3.0.  Exposure to kernel design principals will be use-
ful, but experience with microkernels or Mach is not assumed.

We will discuss the basic structure of Mach and  go  over  MachUs
fundamental  abstractions,  including tasks, threads, ports, mes-
sages and memory objects.

We will examine two important optimizations, lazy evaluation  and
continuations, and discuss how they speed up virtual copy optimi-
zations and intra-machine remote procedure  calls.   Finally,  we
will look at how traditional operating systems, such as UNIX, can
be (and are) implemented in user mode on top of Mach.

David L. Black is a Research Fellow at the Open Software  Founda-
tion's Research Institute in Cambridge, MA.  He received his doc-
torate in Computer Science from  Carnegie  Mellon  University  in
1990,  where he  was one of the key designers and implementors of
Mach.  At OSF, he  continues to work on Mach  in cooperation with
the  Mach  project at CMU. Dr. Black also holds an MS in Computer
Science from CMU and an MA in Mathematics from the University  of
Pennsylvania.

AM 2 Tutorial:
Overview of CHORUS
9:00am - 12:30pm
Instructor: Jim Lipkis, Chorus Systmes

Intended Audience:  Operating system developers and  users,  (en-
gineers,  project leaders, or managers) who are interested in the
CHORUS microkernel technology and its application in  real  time,
distributed,  fault  tolerant,  and  standards-compliant computer
systems.  General familiarity with modern operating  system  con-
cepts  is  helpful,  but no specific knowledge of CHORUS or other
systems is assumed.

CHORUS is a microkernel-based technology for operating systems on
a  wide  variety  of platforms and application domains.  This tu-
torial will cover the basic concepts and facilities  of  the  mi-
crokernel architecture.  Examples are given to illustrate the use
of these facilities in the implementation both of distributed and
fault tolerant UNIX systems and of more specialized embedded sys-
tems.  Emphasis is placed throughout on the  themes  of  software
modularity and policy-mechanism separation, both of which are key
goals of the CHORUS approach.

Specific topics include:

- The role of the microkernel  in  a  distributed  or  real  time
  operating  system
- Overview  of  CHORUS  microkernel functions
  (scheduling, message communications, memory management)
- Transparent   distribution   over   networks   and  multicomputers
- Enablers for fault tolerance implementations
- Real  time features
- Architecture of OS personality implementations
  on top of the microkernel; support for multiple  personalities
- Overview  of CHORUS/MiX,  a compatible and distributed
  microkernel-based UNIX with support for real time applications
- Future directions

Jim Lipkis has been a senior engineer  and  architect  at  Chorus
Systmes  for  the last four years, and has spent a fair amount of
that time giving talks and teaching courses on  CHORUS.   He  has
worked in various areas of parallel operating system and program-
ming language design at Chorus and previously at the Ultracomput-
er Lab at New York University.

PM1 Tutorial:
Introduction to Plan9
1:30pm - 5:00pm
Instructor: Philip Winterbottom, AT&T Bell Labs

The tutorial should appeal to anyone using  or  writing  software
for  networks  of  computers.   No knowledge of Plan9 will be as-
sumed.  The purpose of the tutorial is to demonstrate how  simple
ideas  can  produce  big results.  Plan 9 from Bell Labs is small
operating system based around two important ideas:

%       File systems  can  provide an effective interface to
        system resources, and
%       Those resources can be tied together by a per process
        namespace.  The use of file systems to represent complex
        entities like networks is pushed far beyond the "files
        represent  devices" idea  in  UNIX.   The  result  of
        applying these ideas is a clean small system that makes
        full use of a complex network of  heterogeneous computers.

After an overview of the system the focus of the tutorial will be
the implementation and uses of the namespace to solve some common
problems like heterogeneity, backups, network interfaces and  re-
mote execution.  We will take an application like the cpu command
(which provides remote execution) and explain its operation  from
user  level  to  the  kernel implementation of the namespace upon
which it relies.

Phil Winterbottom is a member of technical staff at AT&T Bell La-
boratories.   He  works in the areas of languages, operating sys-
tems and networks for distributed computing. He is one of the au-
thors of Plan 9.

PM 2 Tutorial:
The Windows NT Architecture
1:30pm - 5:00pm
Instructor: Ted Demopoulos, Demopoulos Associates

Intended Audience: People who are interested  in  learning  about
the internal architecture of Windows NT.  Knowledge of very basic
operating system principles, such  as  what  virtual  memory  and
processes  are,  is assumed.  Familiarity with the internals of a
modern operating system, such as Unix or VMS, would  be  helpful,
although not necessary.

Windows NT is a new operating system that has features that until
recently were only found in research operating systems.  This tu-
torial concentrates on the architecturally interesting  parts  of
the  Windows  NT  operating system.  Knowledge of basic operating
system principles is assumed.

This tutorial will cover:
%       The NT  Kernel
%       Kernel Objects
%       Thread Scheduling
%       Interrupt and Exception Handling
%       I/O
%       The Windows NT I/O Model
%       I/O Processing
%       The  Object Manager
%       NT Executive Objects
%       The NT  Object  Model
%       Object  Security
%       Processes
%       Process  Objects
%       Thread  Objects
%       Protected Subsystems
%       Structure
%       Local  Procedure Calls and Performance Issues
%       Environment Subsystems

Ted  Demopoulos is the president of Demopoulos Associates, a con-
sulting  company  specializing in open systems education and con-
sulting.  He holds a Masters degree  in  Theoretical  Mathematics
from the University of New Hampshire.  Ted was employed by Apollo
Computer and Hewlett-Packard where  he  worked  with  distributed
technologies for five years. Lately he has been serving as a con-
sultant to  the  Open  Software  Foundation  on  distributed  and
operating system technologies. He has been following the develop-
ment of Windows NT since its announcement and  has  been  working
directly  with Windows NT since MicrosoftUs pre-beta release last
summer.

MICROKERNELS PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

8:30 - 8:35     Introduction
                Lori S. Grob, Chorus Systemes

8:35 - 10:30    NEW MICROKERNELS

Is Microkernel Technology Well Suited for the Support of  Object-
Oriented  Systems: The  GUIDE  Experience
P.  Y. Chevalier, A.  Freyssinet, D. Hagimont, S. Lacourte,
X.  Rousset  de  Pina,  and R. Balter, Unite Mixte Bull-IMAG/Systemes

Object-Oriented Transaction Processing in the KeyKOS  Microkernel
William  S.Frantz, Periwinkle Consulting; Charles R. Landau; Tan-
dem Computer

From V to Vanguard:   The  Evolution  of  a  Distributed  Object-
Oriented  Microkernel  Interface
Ross Finlayson, Mark D. Honnecke and Steven Goldberg, Apple Computer

Design and Implementation of an Object-Oriented  64-bit  Single
Address  Space  Microkernel
Kevin Murray, Tim Wilkinson and Peter Osmon, Systems Architecture
Research Centre, Department  of  Computer Science, City University,
London; Ashley Saulsbury, Swedish Institute of Computer Science;
Tom Stiemerling  and  Paul  Kelly, Dept.  of  Computing,
Imperial  College  -  London

10:30 - 11:00    BREAK

11:00 - 12:30   OTHER APPLICATIONS OF MICROKERNEL TECHNOLOGY

Experimentation with a Reconfigurable Microkernel
Bodhisattwa Mukherjee  and Karsten Schwan, College of Computing,
Georgia Institute of Technology

Cohabitation and Cooperation of Chorus and MacOS
Christian  Bac, Institut National des Telecommunications; Edmond
Garnier, Alcatel Alsthom Recherche

Kernel Support for the Wisconsin Wind Tunnel
Steven K. Reinhardt, Babak  Falsafi  and  David  A.  Wood,  Dept.
of Computer Science, University of Wisconsin

12:30 -  2:00   LUNCH

2:00 - 3:00   REAL TIME MACH

RT-IPC:  An IPC Extension for  Real-Time  Mach
Takuro  Kitayama, Hideyuki  Tokuda,  School  of  Computer  Science,
Carnegie Mellon University; Tatsuo Nakajima, Japan Advanced Institute
of  Science and Technology

3:00 - 4:00   TECHNIQUES FOR MICROKERNELS

Fast Interrupt Priority Management in  Operating  System  Kernels
Daniel Stodolsky, Brad Chen and Brian Bershad, School of Computer
Science, Carnegie Mellon University

User Level IPC and Device  Management  in  the  Raven  Kernel
D.  Stuart  Ritchie and Gerald W. Neufeld, Dept. of Computer Science,
The University of British Columbia

4:00 -  4:30  BREAK

4:30 - 6:00  SPRING

Invited Talk - An Indepth Overview of the Spring  System
Michael L. Powell, Sun Microsystems Laboratories, Inc.

A Flexible External Paging Interface
Yousef A. Khalidi  and  Mike Nelson, Sun Microsystems Laboratories, Inc.

6:00 - 6:05  Closing Remarks Lori S. Grob, Chorus Systemes
**********************************************************************

EXPERIENCES WITH DISTRIBUTED AND MULTIPROCESSOR SYSTEMS (SEDMS IV)

                    SEPTEMBER 22 - 23, 1993

Now in its fourth year, SEDMS  continues  to  be  a  forum  which
brings together individuals who have built, are building, or will
soon build distributed  and  multiprocessor  systems,  especially
operating  systems.   As  in  previous years, it will feature re-
fereed presentations on aspects of building, testing,  debugging,
and  using these systems.  Attendees and presenters will exchange
information on their experiences, both good  and  bad,  including
experiences  with  coding  aids, languages, distributed debugging
tools,  prototyping,  reuse  of  existing  software,  performance
analysis, and lessons learned from use of such systems.  The free
interchange is intended to identify what has been right and where
there are opportunities for new solutions.

PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Peter Reiher, General Chair, University of California - Los Angeles
David Cohn, Program Chair, University of Notre Dame
William Bain, Intel Corporation
John Barr, Motorola, Inc.
Roy Campbell, University of Illinois
Partha Dasgupta, Arizona State University
Fred Douglis,  Matsushita Info Tech Laboratory
Brett Fleisch, University of California - Riverside
Debra Hensgen, University of Cincinnati
Dag Johansen,  University of Tromso
Ed Lazowska, University of Washington
John R. Nicol, GTE  Laboratories
Michael O'Dell. UUNET Technologies
Kent Peacock, Intel Multiprocessor Consortium
David Pitts, University of Massachusetts, Lowell
Marc Pucci, Bellcore
Karsten Schwan, Georgia Institute of Technology
Michael Scott, University of Rochester
Volker Tschammer, GMD FOKUS Berlin
Tom Wilkes, GTE  Laboratories

SEDMS IV PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22

9:00 - 9:30     OPENING REMARKS
                  Peter Reiher, UCLA
                  David Cohn, Notre Dame

9:30 - 10:30    KEYNOTE ADDRESS Is There Life After Microkernels?
Prof. Larry Peterson, University of Arizona

Larry L. Peterson is an Associate Professor of  Computer  Science
at  the  University of Arizona, where he directs the Network Sys-
tems Research Group.  He has been involved in the design and  im-
plementation  of  the  x-kernel operating system, the Profile and
Univers naming services, and the  Psync  communication  protocol.
In addition, he is an Associate Editor of the ACM Transactions on
Computer Systems and the IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking.

Dr. Peterson holds a B.S. degree in Computer Science from Kearney
State College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from
Purdue University.

10:30-11:00     BREAK

11:00-Noon      SESSION 1 - LOAD DISTRIBUTION AND PLACEMENT

On the Importance of Parallel Application Placement in NUMA  Mul-
tiprocessors
Tim Brecht, University of Toronto, Canada

Experiences with Load Distribution on Top of the Mach Microkernel
Dejan  S. Milojicic, Peter Giese and Wolfgang Zint, University of
Kaiserslautern, Germany

12:00- 1:30     LUNCH ON YOUR OWN

 1:30-3:00      SESSION  2  -  PERFORMANCE  ISSUES

Performance Analysis of Fine-Grained Locks in Multiprocessor
Operating System Kernels
Joseph P. CaraDonna, Noemi Paciorek and Craig E. Wills, Worcester
Polytechnic Institute

False Sharing and its Effect on Shared Memory Performance
William J. Bolosky and Michael L. Scott, University of Rochester

Parallel Distributed Application Performance and Message Passing:
A Case Study
Nayeem Islam, Robert E. McGrath and Roy H.  Campbell,  University
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

3:00-3:30     BREAK

3:30-4:30 SESSION 3 - IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES IN DISTRIBUTED SHARED MEMORY

Mether-NFS: A Modified NFS Which Supports Virtual  Shared  Memory
Ronald  G.  Minnich  and Maya B. Gokhale, Supercomputing Research
Center

An Implementation of the Shared Data Formats Standard for Distri-
buted  Shared Memories
Maya B. Gokhale and Ronald G. Minnich, Supercomputing Research Center

4:30-5:30     WORKS- IN-PROGRESS

6:00-8:00     JOINT SYMPOSIA RECEPTION

THURSDAY,  SEPTEMBER 23

9:00-10:30      SESSION 4 - IMPACT OF OBJECT TECHNOLOGY

Experience Building a File System on a Highly  Modular  Operating
System
Michael N. Nelson, Yousef A. Khalidi and Peter W. Madany, Sun Mi-
crosystems Labs., Inc.

Electra - Making  Distributed  Programs  Object-Oriented
Silvano Maffeis, University of Zurich

Experience with Shared Object Support in the Guide System
P.Y. Chevalier, A. Freyssinet, D.  Hagimont, S. Krakowiak, S. Lacourte
and X. Rousset de Pina, Bull-IMAG/Systemes, France

10:30-11:00    BREAK

11:00-Noon     SESSION 5 - TOOLS FOR DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING

Debugging Objects and  Threads  in  a  Shared  Memory  System
L.  Gunaseelan  and  Richard  J.  LeBlanc,  Jr., Georgia Institute of
Technology

Performance of Concurrent Servers  Generated  Automatically  from
Sequential  Servers
David  L.  Sims,  Debra A. Hensgen and Lantz Moore, University of
Cincinnati

Noon-1:30       LUNCH ON YOUR OWN

1:30-3:00      SESSION 6 - LANGUAGE AND RUN-TIME SUPPORT

Panda:  A  Portable  Platform  to  Support  Parallel  Programming
Languages
Raoul Bhoedjang, Tim Ruhl, Rutger Hofman, Koen Langendoen,  Henri
Bal and Frans Kaashoek, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and MIT

Distributed Shared Abstractions (DSA) on Large-Scale Multiprocessors
Bodhisattwa  Mukherjee,  Christian  Clemencon  and  Karsten
Schwan, Georgia Institute of Technology

NUMACROS: Data Parallel Programming on NUMA  Multiprocessors
Hui Li and Kenneth C. Sevcik, University of Toronto - Canada

3:00-3:30      BREAK

3:30-5:00      PANEL DISCUSSION

"The Future of Experimental Distributed Systems Research"
Members of the Program Committee

REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Register in advance to receive the lowest registration rates.

MICROKERNEL  TUTORIAL REGISTRATION FEE
September 20  - Full  Day Program                               $275.00
(select one AM presentation and one PM presentation)
Registration fee for Tutorial will increase $50 after September 13, 1993

MICROKERNEL/SEDMS TECHNICAL SESSIONS REGISTRATION FEES
September 21 - 23 - Three Day Program

Member Fee $295.00
The member rate applies to current individual members of
the USENIX Association, Sun User Group, EurOpen and AUUG.

Non-member Fee $360.00

Full-time Student Fee - Must provide copy of student I.D.  75.00

Registration fee for Technical Sessions will increase  $50
after September 13, 1993

Full-time students please note:  A limited number of scholarships
are available for full-time students.  Contact the Conference Of-
fice for details.

Enjoy the Benefits of Becoming a USENIX Member -  If you are  not
a  current USENIX member and wish to join, pay the non-member fee
on the registration form and check  the  special  box  requesting
membership.   $65  of  your  non-member fee will be designated as
dues in full for a one-year individual USENIX Association member-
ship.

PRE-REGISTRATION DEADLINE:  SEPTEMBER 13, 1993 REGISTRATION  FEES
AFTER THAT DATE  WILL INCREASE

Please complete and return the enclosed  registration  form  with
your  payment.   You  may  pay  by  check (MAKE CHECK PAYABLE  TO
USENIX CONFERENCE) or use your VISA, MasterCard, Diners  Club  or
American  Express  charge card.  Payment MUST accompany registra-
tion form.   Purchase  orders  and  vouchers  are  NOT  accepted.
NOTE:   You  may  FAX  your  registration form if paying by VISA,
MasterCard, Diners Club  or American Express.  (To  avoid  dupli-
cate  billing when faxing your registration, do not mail an addi-
tional copy to the Conference Office.  You may telephone our  of-
fice to confirm receipt of your fax.)

REFUND CANCELLATION POLICY:  If you must CANCEL, all  refund  re-
quests  must be in writing and postmarked no later than September
13, 1993.  Direct your letter to the USENIX Conference Office.

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS:  One copy of  both  the  Microkernel  and
SEDMS  proceedings is included with your registration fee. If you
wish to order additional copies, you may contact the USENIX Asso-
ciation  at  Telephone  (510)  528-8649, or direct your email to:
off...@usenix.org.

HOTEL INFORMATION The Symposium headquarters will be:

San Diego Hilton Beach & Tennis & Resort
775  East  Mission  Bay Drive                         ROOM  RATES
San Diego,
California    92109                                        $99.00

Single/Double Occupancy Telephone #(619)276-4010
(Plus current   state  &  local  tax)  Tollfree  -  1-800-HILTONS
Note:  Government employees - Government rate available with
proper identification.

        % Five lighted tennis courts, health club, swimming pool,
          4 jacuzzis
        % Half mile of  beach  with  sailboat,  catamaran,  wind-
          surfboard, aqua cycle and  bicycle rentals

IMPORTANT:  Room reservation deadline is August  28,  1993.   Re-
quests  for reservations received after the deadline will be han-
dled on a space and RATE available basis.

To Make Your Reservation:  Call the Hotel directly  and  ask  for
the Reservations Desk.  To take advantage of our group rate, tell
reservations that you are a USENIX Attendee.  A one night's depo-
sit  is required for all reservations.  Should you desire to can-
cel your reservation, you must notify the hotel at least 48 hours
prior to your scheduled arrival.

AIRPORT TO HOTEL TRANSPORTATION

LINDBERGH FIELD (International Airport)  is  located  15  minutes
from  the  hotel.  Free Hotel shuttle service is available.  Just
go to the baggage claim area, pick up the telephone at the  Hotel
Information  Board  and  dial  the  designated number for the San
Diego Hilton Beach & Tennis Resort.  Taxi service is available at
an approximate cost of $13 one way.

POINTS OF INTEREST

Sunshine, scenery and seven miles of shoreline, fine eating,  fun
nightlife,  and  a  wide array of things to do and see, including
Mexico! - San Diego abounds  with  activities  for  an  enjoyable
visit.   Just a few of the many attractions that San Diego has to
offer include:

 % The San Diego Zoo is noted for rare and exotic  species  exhi-
bits  and  its huge animal collection seen in a 100 acre tropical
garden.  Take the 40 minute guided bus tour on the  double-decker
buses

% Balboa Park includes the  famous  Zoo,  Aerospace  Museum,  the
Fleet  Space  Theater  &  Science  Center, Model Railroad Museum,
wonderful gardens, art museums and much more

% Sea World, home of Shamu

% Enjoy the beach, hot air balloon rides, boat cruises

% Mexico - only 20 miles away - is an  easy  and  fun  day  trip.
U.S.  and Canadian citizens need only valid identification to re-
cross the border and you may bring back up to $400 in  purchases.
Travel  to Tijuana on the San Diego Trolley, a high speed trolley
that runs from downtown to the border.

*********************************************************************
               MICROKERNELS/SEDMS REGISTRATION FORM
*********************************************************************

NAME ____________________________________________

FIRST NAME FOR BADGE _________________________________________________
                       (first)                             (last)

COMPANY OR INSTITUTION:_________________________________________________

MAILING ADDRESS ______________________________________________________

CITY _________________________STATE_____COUNTRY________ZIP____________

TELEPHONE NO:___________________________________________________

NETWORK ADDRESS_________________________________________________
                                (Please write legibly)

If you do NOT want to appear in the attendee list, check here: ___

Is this your first USENIX Conference?   ___Yes  ___No
What is your affiliation?  ___ Academic ___ Commercial ___ Gov't
Are you a current member of the USENIX Association?   ___ Yes  ___No
(If you wish to join USENIX see below.*)

******************FEE SCHEDULE FOR JOINT SYMPOSIA**********************

MICROKERNEL TUTORIAL PROGRAM

All tutorials listed are half-day programs. Select one AM presentation
and one PM presentation.

[_]  AM1  Intro to Mach 3.0 Microkernel  [_] PM1  Intro to Plan9

[_]  AM2  Overview of CHORUS             [_] PM2  The Windows NT
                                                  Architecture

Tutorial program fee - Monday, Sept. 20 ............. $275.00 $ _____
On-site registration fee applies if postmarked
after September 13 ADD............................... $ 50.00 $ _____
_______________________________________________________________________
TECHNICAL SESSIONS FEES
Tuesday - Thursday, Sept 21-23

Current Member....................................... $295.00 $ ______
   Member fee - Applies to current individual members
   of the USENIX Association, Sun User Group, EurOpen, AUUG.

Non-member fee*....................................... 360.00 $ ______

Full-Time Student fee................... ...............75.00 $ ______
(Must provide copy of current student I.D.)

On-site registration fee applies if postmarked
after September 13, 1993 ADD ...........................50.00 $ ______

*USENIX MEMBERSHIP

If you wish to join the USENIX..................... Check Here  ______
$65 of your non-member symposium registration fee will be
applied as dues in full for a one year individual membership
in the USENIX Association.

        TOTAL AMOUNT DUE......................................$ ______

Payments must accompany registration form.  Purchase orders and
Vouchers not accepted.

Payment Enclosed (U.S. Dollars).
Make check payable to USENIX CONFERENCE.

CHARGE TO MY:  ___VISA ___MASTERCARD ___AMERICAN EXPRESS ___DINERS CLUB

ACCOUNT NO._______________________________EXPIRATION DATE_______________

_________________________________________/______________________________                Print Cardholder's Name                 Cardholder's Signature

You may FAX your registration form if paying by credit card to
USENIX CONFERENCE OFFICE, FAX # (714) 588-9706.  (If you FAX
registration, to avoid duplicate billing, do not mail additional copy.)

REFUND CANCELLATION POLICY:  If you must cancel, all refund requests
must be in writing and postmarked no later than September 13, 1993.
Direct any changes to the USENIX Conference Office.

*********************************************************************
            PAYMENT MUST ACCOMPANY REGISTRATION FORM.
             REGISTRATION VIA EMAIL IS NOT ACCEPTED.
*********************************************************************

FOR FURTHER SYMPOSIA INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

USENIX Conference  Office
22672  Lambert  St.,  Suite  613  Lake
Forest,  CA  92630
Telephone (714) 588-8649
FAX Number (714) 588-9706
Electronic Mail Address: confere...@usenix.org Office Hours:
8:30am - 5:00pm Pacific Time