USENIX 1994 Winter Conference Tutorial Sessions

USENIX 1994 Winter Conference Tutorial Sessions

Post by Toni Vegl » Wed, 01 Dec 1993 09:31:27



                  USENIX WINTER 1994 TECHNICAL CONFERENCE

                           January 17-21, 1994

                           San Francisco Hilton
                         San Francisco, California

TUTORIAL PROGRAM

THURSDAY AND FRIDAY, JANUARY 20 AND 21

AT SAN FRANCISCO, you may choose from among nineteen full-day tu-
torials,  covering topics essential to your professional develop-
ment.  Of these nineteen, eight are offered  at  USENIX  for  the
first time.

The USENIX Association's well-respected tutorial  program  offers
you introductory as well as advanced, intensive and practical tu-
torials.  Tutorials are presented by skilled instructors who  are
hands-on  experts  in  their  topic  areas.   All tutorials offer
printed materials, provided at no extra  cost,  to  support  your
understanding and provide reference at a later time.

Attend the tutorials at San Francisco and benefit from  this  op-
portunity  for  in-depth  exploration  and  skill  development in
essential areas of UNIX-related technology.  The USENIX  tutorial
program has been developed to meet the needs of professionals who
require an applied, practical learning experience.

The USENIX tutorial program continues to experience  high  demand
for  its  offerings.   On-site  registration  is possible ONLY if
space  permits.   Several  tutorials   sell   out   before   pre-
registration closes.  Pre-registration is strongly recommended.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 20 NINE FULL-DAY TUTORIALS:
9:00 AM - 5:00  PM (includes box lunch)

T1 Essential UNIX Programming
Richard Stevens, Consultant

T2 Windows  NT  -  An Architectural Overview
Mark Lewin, Microsoft Corporation

T3 Topics in System Administration Part 1
Trent  Hein,  XOR Computer Systems, and Evi Nemeth, University of
  Colorado, Boulder

T4 Achieving Security in an  Internet  Environment
Rob  Kolstad, Berkeley  Software  Design,  Inc.  and  Tina  Darmohray,
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

T5 OSF's Distributed Computing  Environment  (dce)
David  Chappell, Chappell and Associates

T6 How Networks Work  Vincent  C.  Jones,  Consultant

T7  Client-Server Development with DCE/RPC Richard Mackey, Open
Software Foundation

T8 Porting to Solaris 2.x Marc Staveley, Consultant

T9  TCL  and TK:  A  New  Approach to X11 and GUI Programming
John Ousterhout, University of California, Berkeley

FRIDAY, JANUARY 21
TEN FULL-DAY TUTORIALS:  9:00  AM  -  5:00  PM
(includes box lunch)

F1  UNIX Network Programming, Richard Stevens, Consultant

F2  Windows  NT - Developing Client-Server Applications, Mark Lewin, Mi-
    crosoft Corporation

F3  Topics in System Administration Part 2,  Trent Hein, XOR Computer
    Systems, and Evi Nemeth, University of Colorado, Boulder

F4  UNIX Power Tools - Getting the Most out of UNIX, Rob Kolstad,
    Berkeley Software Design, Inc

F5  Distributed Object Computing with CORBA
    David Chappell, Chappell and  Associates

F6  The Law and the Internet, Daniel Appelman, Heller, Ehrman, White
    and McAuliffe

F7  The Kerberos Approach to Network  Security, Dan Geer and
    Jon A. Rochlis, OpenVision Technologies

F8  CHORUS and SVR4 UNIX, Frdric Herrmann and Jim Lipkis, Chorus
    Systemes

F9  Introduction  to Threads, POSIX - Threads, and OSF/DCE Threads
    Nawaf Bitar, Silicon Graphics, Inc.

F10 Sendmail Inside and  Out, Eric Allman, University of California,
    Berkeley

THURSDAY, JANUARY 20

T1 ESSENTIAL UNIX PROGRAMMING
Richard Stevens, Consultant

Intended Audience:  Programmers  and  system  administrators  who
want  to  learn  more  about  the essentials of UNIX programming.
Some programming experience in C is assumed.

This tutorial covers current UNIX programming  concepts  required
for  systems  programming.  It does not cover the basic functions
that most programmers are familiar with  (open,  lseek,  standard
I/O,  etc.).  Rather, our course focuses on the poorly documented
features that tend to  be  least  understood.   Although  current
standards  such  as  POSIX are mentioned, the tutorial focuses on
two real-world implementations of the various  standards:  4.4BSD
and System V Release 4.

Topics covered are: current UNIX standards, process control (race
conditions,  sessions, job control), signals (POSIX.1 signal han-
dling, unreliable  signals,  interrupted  system  calls),  record
locking,  I/O  multiplexing (select and poll), memory mapped I/O,
interprocess  communication  (comparison  of  various   methods),
stream  pipes,  passing  file  descriptors, pseudo terminals, and
threads.

Richard Stevens is author of the books TCP/IP Illustrated (1994),
Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment (1992) and UNIX Net-
work Programming (1990).  He received his PhD in the area of  im-
age processing from the University of Arizona in 1982.  Currently
he is an author and independent consultant  residing  in  Tucson,
Arizona.

FIRST TIME OFFERED!  T2 WINDOWS NT - AN ARCHITECTURAL  OVERVIEW
Mark Lewin, Microsoft Corporation

Intended Audience:  People who are interested in  learning  about
the internal architecture of Windows NT.  Knowledge of very basic
operating system principles, such  as  what  virtual  memory  and
processes  are,  is assumed.  Familiarity with the internals of a
modern operating system, such as UNIX or VMS, would  be  helpful,
although not necessary.

The Microsoft Windows NT operating system is  the  fully  32-bit,
preemptive multitasking member of the Windows OS family.  It com-
bines the user interface and event-driven  programming  model  of
todayUs  Windows  with  the  power and advanced capabilities of a
new, high-end operating system, including integral networking and
security,  availability  on both x86 and RISC platforms, and sup-
port for symmetric multiprocessing (SMP).

The tutorial provides a detailed technical  overview  on  Windows
NT,  including:
-  Microkernel, Executive, and Subsystem architecture  
-  Networking facilities  
-  Security
-  Process and multithreading model
-  Scheduling algorithms
-  Memory management services
-  IPC  facilities
-  Graphics and Windowing system
-  File systems

We also discuss future directions for Windows technology.

Mark Lewin is the Manager of UNIX ISV Relations  for  MicrosoftUs
Systems  Strategic  Marketing group.  In addition to working with
third parties to bring UNIX-based software solutions  to  Windows
NT,  Mark  is  responsible for coordinating the licensing program
which will make Windows NT source code available to  universities
to  use for research work.  Previously Mark was a Program Manager
for the Cairo Project, where he managed Microsoft's RPC  develop-
ment.   Prior  to  joining  Microsoft  in 1989, Mark was a Senior
Software Engineer at Bachman Information Systems and  a  Research
Engineer at Brown University (IRIS).

NEW TOPICS OFFERED!  T3 TOPICS IN SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION Part 1
Trent Hein, XOR Computer Systems, and Evi Nemeth, University of
Colorado, Boulder

Intended Audience:  System administrators who have a year or more
experience  and  wish  to learn state-of-the-art information sur-
rounding the broad area of administration.

This full-day tutorial is presented in four sections:

-  Modern Network Installation - Whether you're moving  into
a  new  building or trying to survive in an old one, this section
talks in depth about current network  technologies,  installation
strategies,  and  design methods.  You'll have a good overview of
todayUs network for tomorrow.

-  Internet Information Services - Putting a user  interface
on  the  Internet  is no easy task.  We talk about setting up and
using services like Gopher, WWW, WAIS, and many more in your user
environment.

-  Fax-to-UNIX - A look at fax modem technology  as  it  re-
lates  to  the  UNIX  community,  including integration of public
domain fax tools is presented in this short introduction to  fax-
ing under UNIX.

-  Remote Dialup Services -  We  compare  and  contrast  the
hardware and software options available to offer corporate dialup
connectivity to your users.  Whether itUs ARA, PPP, SLIP, or good
old UUCP, we discuss capabilities and maintainability of each, so
youUll be able to decide what best suits your users and your  en-
vironment.

Trent Hein grew up in the UNIX system administration trenches  at
the  University  of  Colorado,  Boulder.  He spent Summer 1990 at
Berkeley working on the 4.4BSD port to the MIPS architecture.  He
currently  works  as  a consultant for XOR Network Engineering in
Colorado.

Dr. Evi Nemeth, a faculty  member  in  Computer  Science  at  the
University  of Colorado, has managed UNIX systems for the past 17
years, both from the front lines and from the ivory  tower.   She
is co-author of the best-selling UNIX System Administration Hand-
book (Prentice-Hall).

T4 ACHIEVING SECURITY IN AN  INTERNET  ENVIRONMENT  Rob  Kolstad,
Berkeley  Software  Design,  Inc.  and  Tina  Darmohray, Lawrence
Livermore National Laboratory

Intended Audience:  Programmers, system administrators, technical
and  operational  managers,  and  all professionals interested in
securing computer networks and/or internetwork gateways.   Previ-
ous exposure to TCP/IP networks is a prerequisite.

Often, the success of an enterprise depends  heavily  on  digital
communications.   Until now, the techniques and tools required to
secure a functional TCP/IP network have been an  art  -  acquired
only  through trial and error.  This tutorial presents issues and
solutions surrounding the  securing  of  functional  internetwork
connections.  The tutorial is oriented more toward UNIX than oth-
er systems like VMS and VM.

Without strong building blocks, configuring a firewall is  diffi-
cult.   Once  the basic tools are mastered, firewall construction
proceeds easily (and all the modifications are clear to  the  im-
plementor).   This  tutorial details the building blocks required
to implement a strong firewall, particularly sendmail  configura-
tion  and  DNS  configuration.  It
...

read more »

 
 
 

USENIX 1994 Winter Conference Tutorial Sessions

Post by Toni Vegl » Thu, 02 Dec 1993 10:31:22


                  USENIX WINTER 1994 TECHNICAL CONFERENCE

                           January 17-21, 1994

                           San Francisco Hilton
                         San Francisco, California

TUTORIAL PROGRAM

THURSDAY AND FRIDAY, JANUARY 20 AND 21

AT SAN FRANCISCO, you may choose from among nineteen full-day tu-
torials,  covering topics essential to your professional develop-
ment.  Of these nineteen, eight are offered  at  USENIX  for  the
first time.

The USENIX Association's well-respected tutorial  program  offers
you introductory as well as advanced, intensive and practical tu-
torials.  Tutorials are presented by skilled instructors who  are
hands-on  experts  in  their  topic  areas.   All tutorials offer
printed materials, provided at no extra  cost,  to  support  your
understanding and provide reference at a later time.

Attend the tutorials at San Francisco and benefit from  this  op-
portunity  for  in-depth  exploration  and  skill  development in
essential areas of UNIX-related technology.  The USENIX  tutorial
program has been developed to meet the needs of professionals who
require an applied, practical learning experience.

The USENIX tutorial program continues to experience  high  demand
for  its  offerings.   On-site  registration  is possible ONLY if
space  permits.   Several  tutorials   sell   out   before   pre-
registration closes.  Pre-registration is strongly recommended.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 20 NINE FULL-DAY TUTORIALS:
9:00 AM - 5:00  PM (includes box lunch)

T1 Essential UNIX Programming
Richard Stevens, Consultant

T2 Windows  NT  -  An Architectural Overview
Mark Lewin, Microsoft Corporation

T3 Topics in System Administration Part 1
Trent  Hein,  XOR Computer Systems, and Evi Nemeth, University of
  Colorado, Boulder

T4 Achieving Security in an  Internet  Environment
Rob  Kolstad, Berkeley  Software  Design,  Inc.  and  Tina  Darmohray,
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

T5 OSF's Distributed Computing  Environment  (dce)
David  Chappell, Chappell and Associates

T6 How Networks Work  Vincent  C.  Jones,  Consultant

T7  Client-Server Development with DCE/RPC Richard Mackey, Open
Software Foundation

T8 Porting to Solaris 2.x Marc Staveley, Consultant

T9  TCL  and TK:  A  New  Approach to X11 and GUI Programming
John Ousterhout, University of California, Berkeley

FRIDAY, JANUARY 21
TEN FULL-DAY TUTORIALS:  9:00  AM  -  5:00  PM
(includes box lunch)

F1  UNIX Network Programming, Richard Stevens, Consultant

F2  Windows  NT - Developing Client-Server Applications, Mark Lewin, Mi-
    crosoft Corporation

F3  Topics in System Administration Part 2,  Trent Hein, XOR Computer
    Systems, and Evi Nemeth, University of Colorado, Boulder

F4  UNIX Power Tools - Getting the Most out of UNIX, Rob Kolstad,
    Berkeley Software Design, Inc

F5  Distributed Object Computing with CORBA
    David Chappell, Chappell and  Associates

F6  The Law and the Internet, Daniel Appelman, Heller, Ehrman, White
    and McAuliffe

F7  The Kerberos Approach to Network  Security, Dan Geer and
    Jon A. Rochlis, OpenVision Technologies

F8  CHORUS and SVR4 UNIX, Frdric Herrmann and Jim Lipkis, Chorus
    Systemes

F9  Introduction  to Threads, POSIX - Threads, and OSF/DCE Threads
    Nawaf Bitar, Silicon Graphics, Inc.

F10 Sendmail Inside and  Out, Eric Allman, University of California,
    Berkeley

THURSDAY, JANUARY 20

T1 ESSENTIAL UNIX PROGRAMMING
Richard Stevens, Consultant

Intended Audience:  Programmers  and  system  administrators  who
want  to  learn  more  about  the essentials of UNIX programming.
Some programming experience in C is assumed.

This tutorial covers current UNIX programming  concepts  required
for  systems  programming.  It does not cover the basic functions
that most programmers are familiar with  (open,  lseek,  standard
I/O,  etc.).  Rather, our course focuses on the poorly documented
features that tend to  be  least  understood.   Although  current
standards  such  as  POSIX are mentioned, the tutorial focuses on
two real-world implementations of the various  standards:  4.4BSD
and System V Release 4.

Topics covered are: current UNIX standards, process control (race
conditions,  sessions, job control), signals (POSIX.1 signal han-
dling, unreliable  signals,  interrupted  system  calls),  record
locking,  I/O  multiplexing (select and poll), memory mapped I/O,
interprocess  communication  (comparison  of  various   methods),
stream  pipes,  passing  file  descriptors, pseudo terminals, and
threads.

Richard Stevens is author of the books TCP/IP Illustrated (1994),
Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment (1992) and UNIX Net-
work Programming (1990).  He received his PhD in the area of  im-
age processing from the University of Arizona in 1982.  Currently
he is an author and independent consultant  residing  in  Tucson,
Arizona.

FIRST TIME OFFERED!  T2 WINDOWS NT - AN ARCHITECTURAL  OVERVIEW
Mark Lewin, Microsoft Corporation

Intended Audience:  People who are interested in  learning  about
the internal architecture of Windows NT.  Knowledge of very basic
operating system principles, such  as  what  virtual  memory  and
processes  are,  is assumed.  Familiarity with the internals of a
modern operating system, such as UNIX or VMS, would  be  helpful,
although not necessary.

The Microsoft Windows NT operating system is  the  fully  32-bit,
preemptive multitasking member of the Windows OS family.  It com-
bines the user interface and event-driven  programming  model  of
todayUs  Windows  with  the  power and advanced capabilities of a
new, high-end operating system, including integral networking and
security,  availability  on both x86 and RISC platforms, and sup-
port for symmetric multiprocessing (SMP).

The tutorial provides a detailed technical  overview  on  Windows
NT,  including:
-  Microkernel, Executive, and Subsystem architecture  
-  Networking facilities  
-  Security
-  Process and multithreading model
-  Scheduling algorithms
-  Memory management services
-  IPC  facilities
-  Graphics and Windowing system
-  File systems

We also discuss future directions for Windows technology.

Mark Lewin is the Manager of UNIX ISV Relations  for  MicrosoftUs
Systems  Strategic  Marketing group.  In addition to working with
third parties to bring UNIX-based software solutions  to  Windows
NT,  Mark  is  responsible for coordinating the licensing program
which will make Windows NT source code available to  universities
to  use for research work.  Previously Mark was a Program Manager
for the Cairo Project, where he managed Microsoft's RPC  develop-
ment.   Prior  to  joining  Microsoft  in 1989, Mark was a Senior
Software Engineer at Bachman Information Systems and  a  Research
Engineer at Brown University (IRIS).

NEW TOPICS OFFERED!  T3 TOPICS IN SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION Part 1
Trent Hein, XOR Computer Systems, and Evi Nemeth, University of
Colorado, Boulder

Intended Audience:  System administrators who have a year or more
experience  and  wish  to learn state-of-the-art information sur-
rounding the broad area of administration.

This full-day tutorial is presented in four sections:

-  Modern Network Installation - Whether you're moving  into
a  new  building or trying to survive in an old one, this section
talks in depth about current network  technologies,  installation
strategies,  and  design methods.  You'll have a good overview of
todayUs network for tomorrow.

-  Internet Information Services - Putting a user  interface
on  the  Internet  is no easy task.  We talk about setting up and
using services like Gopher, WWW, WAIS, and many more in your user
environment.

-  Fax-to-UNIX - A look at fax modem technology  as  it  re-
lates  to  the  UNIX  community,  including integration of public
domain fax tools is presented in this short introduction to  fax-
ing under UNIX.

-  Remote Dialup Services -  We  compare  and  contrast  the
hardware and software options available to offer corporate dialup
connectivity to your users.  Whether itUs ARA, PPP, SLIP, or good
old UUCP, we discuss capabilities and maintainability of each, so
youUll be able to decide what best suits your users and your  en-
vironment.

Trent Hein grew up in the UNIX system administration trenches  at
the  University  of  Colorado,  Boulder.  He spent Summer 1990 at
Berkeley working on the 4.4BSD port to the MIPS architecture.  He
currently  works  as  a consultant for XOR Network Engineering in
Colorado.

Dr. Evi Nemeth, a faculty  member  in  Computer  Science  at  the
University  of Colorado, has managed UNIX systems for the past 17
years, both from the front lines and from the ivory  tower.   She
is co-author of the best-selling UNIX System Administration Hand-
book (Prentice-Hall).

T4 ACHIEVING SECURITY IN AN  INTERNET  ENVIRONMENT  Rob  Kolstad,
Berkeley  Software  Design,  Inc.  and  Tina  Darmohray, Lawrence
Livermore National Laboratory

Intended Audience:  Programmers, system administrators, technical
and  operational  managers,  and  all professionals interested in
securing computer networks and/or internetwork gateways.   Previ-
ous exposure to TCP/IP networks is a prerequisite.

Often, the success of an enterprise depends  heavily  on  digital
communications.   Until now, the techniques and tools required to
secure a functional TCP/IP network have been an  art  -  acquired
only  through trial and error.  This tutorial presents issues and
solutions surrounding the  securing  of  functional  internetwork
connections.  The tutorial is oriented more toward UNIX than oth-
er systems like VMS and VM.

Without strong building blocks, configuring a firewall is  diffi-
cult.   Once  the basic tools are mastered, firewall construction
proceeds easily (and all the modifications are clear to  the  im-
plementor).   This  tutorial details the building blocks required
to implement a strong firewall, particularly sendmail  configura-
tion  and  DNS  configuration.  It
...

read more »