How to find out who has read my home page?

How to find out who has read my home page?

Post by Robert Cho » Mon, 15 May 1995 04:00:00



Hello, everyone,

        Sorry if this has been one of the FAQs. I wonder if anyone
knows how to get a 'log' file so that I can tell who has read my
home page? Thanks a lot in advance!

--
Robert Chong

http://rclsgi.eng.ohio-state.edu/~chong-c/chong.html

 
 
 

How to find out who has read my home page?

Post by Patrick L » Mon, 15 May 1995 04:00:00



>    Sorry if this has been one of the FAQs. I wonder if anyone
> knows how to get a 'log' file so that I can tell who has read my
> home page? Thanks a lot in advance!

Most web servers maintain a log.  Whether your site maintains
one, and whether you have access to it, is up to the individual
system admin.  Also, the log only tells you where (as in an IP
address) an access came from.  There is no way to tell who (as in
an e-mail address) has accessed your pages.

--
Patrick Lee                              Stuyvesant H.S. Alumni Assoc.

Web: http://www.panix.com/~patlee        Web: http://www.panix.com/~stuy

 
 
 

How to find out who has read my home page?

Post by Jacob C Kesing » Wed, 17 May 1995 04:00:00



>Hello, everyone,
>    Sorry if this has been one of the FAQs. I wonder if anyone
>knows how to get a 'log' file so that I can tell who has read my
>home page? Thanks a lot in advance!

You could try <a
href="http://rowlf.cc.wwu.edu:8080/~n9146070/wamp.html">WAMP</a>

If you have access to the logfile, that is.  Look for a file
called access_log somewhere in the filesystem (every location has them
in a different place; ask the local admins if you can't find it).

  --Jake

--

http://rowlf.cc.wwu.edu:8080/~n9146070/  SF, Pratchett, Deverry
"Of course, real people don't _have_ .sigs"
         Robert Mark Vaugh

 
 
 

How to find out who has read my home page?

Post by Andrew Davi » Sun, 21 May 1995 04:00:00




: >Hello, everyone,

: >  Sorry if this has been one of the FAQs. I wonder if anyone
: >knows how to get a 'log' file so that I can tell who has read my
: >home page? Thanks a lot in advance!

For NCSA httpd, or clones, the log file defaults to
/usr/local/etc/httpd/logs/access_log
If your website won't let you see it, or wants to charge you $$ for a precis,
but does let you make CGI scripts, include an inline image like
<img src=bozo.cgi>
where bozo.cgi is

#!/bin/sh
echo $REMOTE_ADDR >> logfile
echo Content-type: image/gif
echo
cat bozo.gif
exit

making sure that the httpd process can write to logfile. You might have to write
another CGI to delete the logfile occasionally
#!/bin/sh
rm logfile
echo Content-type: text/plain
echo
echo Just deleted logfile
exit

If you've access to the ftp transfer log, try an ftp:// URL and maybe
you'll pick up some email addresses too.
One page I tried - 55 accesses, maybe 20 possible email addresses, 4 real names
with finger.  If you think that's invasive, if you call someone on the phone
who has caller ID and a CD-ROM ,they can get your street address before they answer
the phone. Considering going ex-directory now ?? :)=   (this is normal practice
for anonymous ftp, anyhow, plus maybe a reverse DNS check).

--

TRIUMF                voice: 604-222-7376
4004 Wesbrook Mall    fax:   604-222-7307
Vancouver BC          http://andrew.triumf.ca/~andrew
Canada   V6T 2A3      49D14.7N 123D13.6W

 
 
 

How to find out who has read my home page?

Post by David Smi » Tue, 30 May 1995 04:00:00




> Hello, everyone,

>         Sorry if this has been one of the FAQs. I wonder if anyone
> knows how to get a 'log' file so that I can tell who has read my
> home page? Thanks a lot in advance!

Ask your Sysadmin. All the major httpd  servers have the option of
logging, most do it by default, both a error log and access log.  Many
places that dont' use the access log disable it since it can grow HUGE.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
David A. Smith        | Department of Computer Science and Engineering

 
 
 

1. More page outs than page ins?

Hi,

Would anyone be kind enough to explain to me why systems usually have
more page-outs than page-ins? It has got me stumped for quite some
time. I would think that if 100mb is paged out from memory to disk,
then similarly 100mb should be paged-in back from disk to physical
memory?

Or is my understand of paging-in and paging-out wrong? i.e Page-outs
occur when a page is pushed from main memory to the paging space due
to a variety of reasons (lack of physical memory being one of them)
while page-ins' occur when there is free physical memory and these
pages are pushed back from disk back to the physical memory.

TIA!

2. compiling kernel problem

3. Robot's Unable to find Home Page?

4. Waiting for Red Hat 6.0

5. Removing banner pages from print outs

6. Question on Ports software

7. not printing last page of long print outs.

8. Slackware, LaTeX2e, and PostScript fonts (solution)

9. page outs in Solaris 7

10. Page outs with LOTSA memory: why?

11. How to find out application that send outs packets on certain port

12. find without the "find: cannot read dir /usr/lost+found: Permission denied"

13. finding pages for page out