tcsh and ESC

tcsh and ESC

Post by 'Lord Luc' Barbare » Thu, 10 Nov 1994 22:21:24



Hello !

I'd just like to ask a question. Is it possible to change
the completion key in tcsh from TAB to ESC ?
Right now I'm using a csh and I'd like to switch to tcsh,
but I find it hard for me to get used to the TAB key instead
of the ESC.

Please answer me via e-mail since I don't read very often
this group.

Ciao,
        Luca

BTW Is there any other shell (bash? zsh?) that allows the user
    to choose a different key for filename completion ?
--
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IRCNick : Belgarath                    |  /'>     <`\   a wise man steps.
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tcsh and ESC

Post by Holger Ried » Fri, 11 Nov 1994 17:36:26



:
: BTW Is there any other shell (bash? zsh?) that allows the user
:     to choose a different key for filename completion ?

Hi,
        `bash' lets you do just this, because it's using the GNU readline
library. You can change all the key-bindings and store them in your
~/.inputrc file:
                                ESC: complete
That's it.

Regards,
        --Teggy

--
  | Torsten Grust                                                            |
  | Database Research Group, University of Konstanz (Lake Constance/Germany) |


 
 
 

tcsh and ESC

Post by Brian Blackmo » Mon, 14 Nov 1994 05:14:09



: :
: : BTW Is there any other shell (bash? zsh?) that allows the user
: :     to choose a different key for filename completion ?

: Hi,
:       `bash' lets you do just this, because it's using the GNU readline
: library. You can change all the key-bindings and store them in your
: ~/.inputrc file:
:                               ESC: complete

Ermm... not quite, because you can't actually use ESC in that way in bash
either. There is a good reason for this.

The choice of ESC as a user key on its own, is in general a BAD IDEA, it
causes all sort of problems. As anyone who's ever accidentally pressed
the arrow keys in a non editting mode will tell you ESC is the character
that marks the start of an escape sequence. Thus when you get an ESC
character how do you know if you have the start of an escape sequence or
just a press of escape. Standard csh "gets round" this by not using any of
the other escape sequences, while vi sets a timeout, which can go wrong in
certain circumstances (ever tried vi on a random lag link ??).

Even if your shell/application does allow ESC as a binding key its probably
best to avoid using. With tcsh/bash/zsh stick with TAB (I wish ksh would
use tab as well)

BTW Disreguard the above for true X applications, X's handling is different.

--
Brian Blackmore.

 
 
 

tcsh and ESC

Post by Sven Wischnows » Tue, 15 Nov 1994 22:40:19





> : :
> : : BTW Is there any other shell (bash? zsh?) that allows the user
> : :     to choose a different key for filename completion ?

> : Hi,
> :  `bash' lets you do just this, because it's using the GNU readline
> : library. You can change all the key-bindings and store them in your
> : ~/.inputrc file:
> :                          ESC: complete

> Ermm... not quite, because you can't actually use ESC in that way in bash
> either. There is a good reason for this.

> The choice of ESC as a user key on its own, is in general a BAD IDEA, it
> causes all sort of problems. As anyone who's ever accidentally pressed
> the arrow keys in a non editting mode will tell you ESC is the character
> that marks the start of an escape sequence. Thus when you get an ESC
> character how do you know if you have the start of an escape sequence or
> just a press of escape. Standard csh "gets round" this by not using any of
> the other escape sequences, while vi sets a timeout, which can go wrong in
> certain circumstances (ever tried vi on a random lag link ??).

> Even if your shell/application does allow ESC as a binding key its probably
> best to avoid using. With tcsh/bash/zsh stick with TAB (I wish ksh would
> use tab as well)

> BTW Disreguard the above for true X applications, X's handling is different.

Disregard the above for the zsh, too. The zsh uses a timeout to allow
you to bind key function to prefix keys.

Bye
 Sven

--

 
 
 

1. How to tell tcsh to literally display ESC (not as ^[) in prompt

Hello,

Can someone tell me how to tcsh to send an escape character as part of a
prompt?  The following illustrates the prompt I'm having.....

% ### Make double wide letters on a vtXXX terminal, works in csh.

% set prompt="\e#6\! eagle> "
^[#633 eagle>

Please E-mail me any responses.  If I get very many "me too" requests,
I'll post...

thanks,

--
Jim Barbour             National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Voice:(303) 497-5262    3100 Marine St. Room 248
FAX:  (303) 497-7256    Boulder, Co. 80303

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