Differences between AIX 4.3.1 and 4.3.2

Differences between AIX 4.3.1 and 4.3.2

Post by Master P » Fri, 22 Jan 1999 04:00:00




> Well, there were new things in AIX 4.3.2.  For example, in the TCP/IP
> area, we did a major update of the following:

> . IPv6 -- added routing support
> . gated -- updated to a modern version

> -Dave

I have a pressing question concerning gated. We are using a "customized" version
of gated on our SP systems because the one that came stock with AIX 4.2.1 only
supported up to 64 routes with OSPF. Does the new gated that comes with AIX 4.3.2
support > 64 routes? This would be great, because it would mean that we could
dump our customized version.

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Differences between AIX 4.3.1 and 4.3.2

Post by Mary Wis » Fri, 22 Jan 1999 04:00:00




> > Well, there were new things in AIX 4.3.2.  For example, in the TCP/IP
> > area, we did a major update of the following:

> > . IPv6 -- added routing support
> > . gated -- updated to a modern version

> > -Dave

> I have a pressing question concerning gated. We are using a "customized" version
> of gated on our SP systems because the one that came stock with AIX 4.2.1 only
> supported up to 64 routes with OSPF. Does the new gated that comes with AIX 4.3.2
> support > 64 routes? This would be great, because it would mean that we could
> dump our customized version.

I checked, and the version of gated in AIX 4.3.2 has RTBIT_SIZE set to 8, which will
allow for
256 targets as opposed to the older version which only allowed 64 targets.

Hope this helps,
Mary

--


 
 
 

Differences between AIX 4.3.1 and 4.3.2

Post by Dan Schlit » Fri, 22 Jan 1999 04:00:00


I have a rather different question about the 4.3.1 to 4.3.2 transition.
Using fixdist to get patches I find that in quite a number of cases
there is an insistence on including bos.64bit as a part of the colletion
to be downloaded. We have no current desire to do 64 bit on our AIX
machines. What problems will I encounter if that part of the basic
operating system is installed.

Evidently this inclusion of 64bit brings with it an extensice change in
other parts of the bos and in the devices. The result is a 120 Meg +
bunch of files to transfer. Before getting involved in that sort of
transfer I would like to have a bit of assurance that it will not cause
problems when I install the stuff.

/dan

--

Dan Schlitt                       System Management Arts        

tel: (914)948-6200 x 7210         White Plains, New York 10601

 
 
 

Differences between AIX 4.3.1 and 4.3.2

Post by José Pina Coelh » Sun, 24 Jan 1999 04:00:00



> I have a rather different question about the 4.3.1 to 4.3.2 transition.
> Using fixdist to get patches I find that in quite a number of cases
> there is an insistence on including bos.64bit as a part of the colletion
> to be downloaded. We have no current desire to do 64 bit on our AIX
> machines. What problems will I encounter if that part of the basic
> operating system is installed.

No problems whatsoever.

Even though it's installed, it must be enabled to work.

 
 
 

1. tcsetattr differences between AIX 3.2.5 and AIX 4.1.4

Gang,

   I am using the piece of code shown below to hang up a modem.  The
general
idea is to use tcgetattr() to save the current tty attributes, set the
baud rate to
zero, then restore the previous settings.  I use this (fairly standard)
technique
to hang up modems under SCO Unix, SCO Xenix,  AT&T System V, and AIX
3.2.5.  It works under AIX 4.1.4 as well, except for one annoying
detail...  when
the previous settings get restored, AIX doesn't bring the modem lines
(like
DTR) back up.  (Which of course then prevents any further communication
from the modem...)  Yes, if worse comes to worse, I can set the modems to
pretend
that DTR is always present, but due to the number of installations and the
distance across which they are scattered, this is a less than optimal
solution.

    For what it's worth, I'm using gcc 2.7.2 to compile user AIX 3.2.5,
and then
move the executable to AIX 4.1.4.

    If anyone's been down this road before, I'd really appreciate your
insight.

    -Doug

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------

void hangup()
{

        struct timeval oneSecDelay = {1, 0};
        struct termios currentSettings;

        /*  Get the current terminal attributes  */
        tcgetattr(portfd, &currentSettings);

        /*  Save the input and output baudrates  */
        speed_t currentispeed=cfgetispeed(&currentSettings);
        speed_t currentospeed=cfgetospeed(&currentSettings);

        /*  Set the baudrates to zero (to force tcsetattr to hangup)  */
        cfsetospeed(&currentSettings, B0);
        cfsetispeed(&currentSettings, B0);

        /*  Turn off modem signals  (hangup)  */
        tcsetattr(portfd, TCSAFLUSH, &currentSettings);

        /*  Delay for 1 second  */
        select(1, NULL, NULL, NULL, &oneSecDelay);

        /*  Restore our previously saved baudrates  */
        cfsetospeed(&currentSettings, currentospeed);
        cfsetispeed(&currentSettings, currentispeed);

        /*  Inform the serialport of our changes  */
        tcsetattr(portfd, TCSANOW, &currentSettings);

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