To get the file name knowing inode value?

To get the file name knowing inode value?

Post by Karthik Subbia » Thu, 30 Aug 2001 14:37:15



Hi Guys,

Is there any simple way to get a file name knowing its inode value?.

Waiting for ur answers,
karthik.

 
 
 

To get the file name knowing inode value?

Post by Helmut Leininge » Thu, 30 Aug 2001 15:02:24



> Hi Guys,

> Is there any simple way to get a file name knowing its inode value?.

> Waiting for ur answers,
> karthik.

Several ways. One is: find . -inum nnnnnn -print

--
Helmut Leininger

Integris AG / Vienna
Open Systems Support


This opinion is mine and not necessarily that of my employer.
No guarantees whatsoever.

 
 
 

To get the file name knowing inode value?

Post by Sabine Schneidere » Thu, 30 Aug 2001 18:52:30




> > Hi Guys,

> > Is there any simple way to get a file name knowing its inode value?.

> > Waiting for ur answers,
> > karthik.

> Several ways. One is: find . -inum nnnnnn -print

> --
> Helmut Leininger

> Integris AG / Vienna
> Open Systems Support


> This opinion is mine and not necessarily that of my employer.
> No guarantees whatsoever.

-----------------------
Hi,
ncheck -i <inode value>; for this command you have to be root.
Regards,
Sabine
 
 
 

To get the file name knowing inode value?

Post by Ulrich Koern » Thu, 30 Aug 2001 20:23:32


ncheck

> Hi Guys,

> Is there any simple way to get a file name knowing its inode value?.

> Waiting for ur answers,
> karthik.

 
 
 

1. How to get file name when inode number is known?

"the" full path name?  It may have none, or it may have more than one.
In any case, this is an OS question, not a C question.  Since from your
mention of inode numbers I assume you're on a UNIX derivative, I'm
crossposting to comp.unix.questions and sending followups there.

If you have access to the underlying medium (eg, raw disk for local
filesystems, raw network for network-remote filesystems), you can in
principle build code that speaks directly to that underlying medium and
figures it out.  I wrote such a program for Berkeley FFS filesystems on
local disks, for example.  If you have no access beneath the filesystem
level, you'll have to walk the directory tree and hope.  (Walking the
directory tree is usually slow, and can miss perfectly valid paths for
permissions reasons - eg, mode 111 directories.)

                                        der Mouse


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