contamination with UNIX intellectual property and job changes

contamination with UNIX intellectual property and job changes

Post by chupmecu.. » Thu, 23 Sep 1999 04:00:00



I'd like a reading from anyone with experience with or a vantage
point on the following, based on current conditions in the UNIX
vendor community:

Say you are a developer with several years' (<10) experience working
on a vendor's UNIX system (trade secret, non-free), and you have access
to the source, all the way from utilities to the kernel.  You then
choose to change jobs, and work for another UNIX vendor, on similar
types of components, say the IP stack.  You are bound by a standard
non-disclosure agreement when you leave your old employer.

- from the perspective of the employee, what would  your level of
concern be that your contamination with the old employer's source would
cause your new employer to decide that you could not work on similar
components because of proprietary information issues ?

- from the perspective of the _new_ employer, what would be your similar
concerns about what work this new employee could do ?  For example, if
the employee had worked on the IP stack of his previous employer's
UNIX, would you choose not to have them work on your IP stack ?  (Or
would vendors you're familiar with choose not to have them do so.)

I'm only concerned here with UNIX vendors; heavily protected trash
like Microslop is not of concern here.  My personal experience is
of various degrees of anality among employers about contamination,
I'm curious about the current state of affairs among UNIX vendors.
Also, I realize that most people reading this aren't lawyers (if you
are one & can reply, that would be great), I'm looking for information
from regular developers (or management) with perspective on or
experience with this.

Thanks a bunch

Identity changed for obvious reasons, feel free not to reveal yours or
that of companies you refer to.

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

 
 
 

contamination with UNIX intellectual property and job changes

Post by pe.. » Sat, 25 Sep 1999 04:00:00


: I'd like a reading from anyone with experience with or a vantage
: point on the following, based on current conditions in the UNIX
: vendor community:

No *personal* experience of this schenario but :

: Say you are a developer with several years' (<10) experience working
: on a vendor's UNIX system (trade secret, non-free), and you have access
: to the source, all the way from utilities to the kernel.  You then
: choose to change jobs, and work for another UNIX vendor, on similar
: types of components, say the IP stack.  You are bound by a standard
: non-disclosure agreement when you leave your old employer.

: - from the perspective of the employee, what would  your level of
: concern be that your contamination with the old employer's source would
: cause your new employer to decide that you could not work on similar
: components because of proprietary information issues ?

Your knowledge will remain your personal asset. Any code snippets
brought with you is your former employers propersty(independent of
media used , floppy, brain or paper)

: - from the perspective of the _new_ employer, what would be your similar
: concerns about what work this new employee could do ?  For example, if
: the employee had worked on the IP stack of his previous employer's
: UNIX, would you choose not to have them work on your IP stack ?  (Or
: would vendors you're familiar with choose not to have them do so.)

Your new employer knows your origin, this might very well be the
main reason for hiring you. So he will expect you to deliver the best
you can. But, and this is importent, he must and will respect when you
refuse to tell exactly how something was done at your previous job.
(think of it for a while, if you tell your new employer all about
your previous secrets you may very well tell your next employer ...)

Respecting non disclosures might be a way of gaining status as
"a person we may trust".

: I'm only concerned here with UNIX vendors; heavily protected trash
: like Microslop is not of concern here.  My personal experience is
: of various degrees of anality among employers about contamination,
: I'm curious about the current state of affairs among UNIX vendors.
: Also, I realize that most people reading this aren't lawyers (if you
: are one & can reply, that would be great), I'm looking for information
: from regular developers (or management) with perspective on or
: experience with this.

Take it another way: you might use your assembled experience to make
an even  better product since you learned from previous mistakes.

: Thanks a bunch

: Identity changed for obvious reasons, feel free not to reveal yours or
: that of companies you refer to.

Coming from auto-industries, it's a common situration here too ...

: Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
: Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

--
--
Peter H?kanson   peter (at) gbg (dot) netman (dot) se

 
 
 

contamination with UNIX intellectual property and job changes

Post by Lee Courtne » Wed, 17 Nov 1999 04:00:00


My experience is not exactly the same. I did work for a vendor (HP) and had
extensive access to proprietary IP (MPE Operating System). But instead of
going to another vendor started my own company. HP tried to impose legal
entanglements, but in the long run they were blowing smoke (HP's Employee
Invention Agreement was modified after I left). My advice - see an attorney
regarding your situation. My attorney had some great advice, not all of
which had to do with the legalities of the situation. Good luck.

Lee Courtney
President
Monterey Software Group Inc.

1350 Pear Avenue, Suite J
Mountain View, California 94043-1302
(650) 964-7052 voice (650) 964-6735 fax
http://www.editcorp.com/Businesses/Monterey Software
Advanced Authentication, Audit, and Access Control for HP3000 Servers


Quote:> I'd like a reading from anyone with experience with or a vantage
> point on the following, based on current conditions in the UNIX
> vendor community:

> Say you are a developer with several years' (<10) experience working
> on a vendor's UNIX system (trade secret, non-free), and you have access
> to the source, all the way from utilities to the kernel.  You then
> choose to change jobs, and work for another UNIX vendor, on similar
> types of components, say the IP stack.  You are bound by a standard
> non-disclosure agreement when you leave your old employer.

> - from the perspective of the employee, what would  your level of
> concern be that your contamination with the old employer's source would
> cause your new employer to decide that you could not work on similar
> components because of proprietary information issues ?

> - from the perspective of the _new_ employer, what would be your similar
> concerns about what work this new employee could do ?  For example, if
> the employee had worked on the IP stack of his previous employer's
> UNIX, would you choose not to have them work on your IP stack ?  (Or
> would vendors you're familiar with choose not to have them do so.)

> I'm only concerned here with UNIX vendors; heavily protected trash
> like Microslop is not of concern here.  My personal experience is
> of various degrees of anality among employers about contamination,
> I'm curious about the current state of affairs among UNIX vendors.
> Also, I realize that most people reading this aren't lawyers (if you
> are one & can reply, that would be great), I'm looking for information
> from regular developers (or management) with perspective on or
> experience with this.

> Thanks a bunch

> Identity changed for obvious reasons, feel free not to reveal yours or
> that of companies you refer to.

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

 
 
 

1. Does innovation require intellectual property rights

http://www.reason.com/0303/fe.dc.creation.shtml

March 2003

Creation Myths
Does innovation require intellectual property rights?

By Douglas Clement

".. As for software, Boldrin refers to an MIT working paper by
economists Eric Maskin and James Bessen. Maskin and Bessen write that
"some of the most innovative industries today -- software, computers
and semiconductors -- have historically had weak patent protection and
have experienced rapid imitation of their products .."

".. Moreover, U.S. court decisions in the 1980s that strengthened
patent protection for software led to less innovation. "Far from
unleashing a flurry of new innovative activity," Maskin and Bessen
write, "these stronger property rights ushered in a period of
stagnant, if not declining, R&D among those industries and firms that
patented most." Industries that depend on sequential product
development -- the initial version is followed by an improved second
version, etc. -- are, they argue, likely to be stifled by stronger
intellectual property regimes .."

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5. Intellectual Property Rights

6. VGA display modes at boot

7. Proposal: Liberated Intellectual Property Organization (LIPO)

8. F50 Maintenance Mode

9. intellectual property and the GPL

10. Intellectual property rights

11. BILL GATES / MICROSOFT CAUGHT STEALING INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY !

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