The "w" command in UNIX

The "w" command in UNIX

Post by cage » Sun, 03 Dec 1995 04:00:00




 > Hi - can anyone help me out with the following question -
 >
 > Is there anyway I can prevent other users to know what I am doing using
 > the "w <usr name>" command.
 >

     Nope.  There is a way of making it look like you're doing something else,
     though.  Try this:

     ln -s /usr/ucb/vi "None of your damn business"

     Then you can make an alias like so:

     alias v="None\  of\ your\ damn\ business"

     Now anytime you want to use 'vi', type 'v' instead and everybody else would
     see:

     kegranro ttyp1     4:50pm                      None of your damn business

Hope this helped!
--
                                   wWw
+-----------------------          (o o)        ------------------------+
|Kurt Granroth          \------ooO-(_)-Ooo-----\                       |
|Computer Science Major  \ Linux: The choice of \ Damn the torpedoes,  |

+----------------------------------------------------------------------+

 
 
 

The "w" command in UNIX

Post by Vishal khem » Sun, 03 Dec 1995 04:00:00


Hi - can anyone help me out with the following question -

Is there anyway I can prevent other users to know what I am doing using
the "w <usr name>" command.

Thanks in advance
- Vishal


 
 
 

The "w" command in UNIX

Post by Sahir N. Siddiq » Mon, 04 Dec 1995 04:00:00


   Hi - can anyone help me out with the following question -

   Is there anyway I can prevent other users to know what I am doing using
   the "w <usr name>" command.

   Thanks in advance
   - Vishal

-----
Run screen (if its installed), and mark all your windows as logged
out.  Of course, your processes would still be visible in a ps
listing.
-s
--
Sahir N. Siddiqui         Res: (201) 217-0952
PO Box 5176, Hoboken NJ 07030                       ))))
                                                   oo-)

 
 
 

The "w" command in UNIX

Post by Rich K » Tue, 05 Dec 1995 04:00:00




>Hi - can anyone help me out with the following question -

>Is there anyway I can prevent other users to know what I am doing using
>the "w <usr name>" command.

>Thanks in advance
>- Vishal


 why is it that  when someone asks the above question it is from an .edu
 account?

  richk

 
 
 

The "w" command in UNIX

Post by Bill Marc » Wed, 06 Dec 1995 04:00:00




Quote:>Run screen (if its installed), and mark all your windows as logged
>out.  Of course, your processes would still be visible in a ps
>listing.

s/if its installed/if it's installed AND the admins have not disabled the \
logout command/
--
"Goodness me, could this be industrial disease?"  Dire Straits
 
 
 

The "w" command in UNIX

Post by Bill Marc » Wed, 06 Dec 1995 04:00:00



> why is it that  when someone asks the above question it is from an .edu
> account?

Because people with .edu accounts are trying to learn?
Because most .com users nowadays use WWW browsers and other graphic
software instead of Unix shells?

--
"Goodness me, could this be industrial disease?"  Dire Straits

 
 
 

The "w" command in UNIX

Post by Marco Pagani » Sat, 09 Dec 1995 04:00:00


Quote:> Is there anyway I can prevent other users to know what I am doing using
> the "w <usr name>" command.

Another way   is  to  use  redirection.  So,  instead  of  doing  "cat
/etc/passwd", you  could  do  "cat </etc/passwd", and only "cat" would
show on the "w" command line.

Cheers,
Paga

--
===============================================================================

IRC:  Lobsang (Undernet)                                  friends use Macs..."

 
 
 

The "w" command in UNIX

Post by Ghot » Mon, 11 Dec 1995 04:00:00


Someone wrote..

Quote:> Is there anyway I can prevent other users to know what I am doing using
> the "w <usr name>" command.

The way I did it was to edit my .login files.  On the line that calls the xterm
insert a -ut.  This prevents the xterm from being logged in the file called
(something like) /etc/utmp or summat and stops you showing up on w at all, but
still on ps.

Tom


 
 
 

The "w" command in UNIX

Post by Ghot » Mon, 11 Dec 1995 04:00:00


Someone wrote..

Quote:> Is there anyway I can prevent other users to know what I am doing using
> the "w <usr name>" command.

The way I did it was to edit my .login files.  On the line that calls the xterm
insert a -ut.  This prevents the xterm from being logged in the file called
(something like) /etc/utmp or summat and stops you showing up on w at all, but
still on ps.

Tom


 
 
 

The "w" command in UNIX

Post by Ghot » Mon, 11 Dec 1995 04:00:00


Someone wrote..

Quote:> Is there anyway I can prevent other users to know what I am doing using
> the "w <usr name>" command.

The way I did it was to edit my .login files.  On the line that calls the xterm
insert a -ut.  This prevents the xterm from being logged in the file called
(something like) /etc/utmp or summat and stops you showing up on w at all, but
still on ps.

Tom


 
 
 

1. quirk: man won't man "w" won't "w" and no telnet

I have been running Linux for a few month's now and have been happy as hell
with it.  While fiddling with dosemu I think something got messed up.  I
have three things going wrong that I know of
1:
when I hit "w" for who I get:

_setutent: Can't open utmp file: No such file or directory

The file does exist and I played with the permissions some and still I get
the same error.  wtmp exists as well.

2:
when I man anything I get:

/usr/man/preformat/cat.*/*.* line?/? (END)   cat.* is cat.1, cat.2...etc
and *.* is what I man'ed for.1, .2.....etc

3:
when I try to telnet or ftp back to my machine from my machine and I'm not
logged in(ppp) then it tells me I can't.  I know I can because I've done it
before... This one is the least of my worries.

I'm running kernel 1.1.70 and have since tried 1.1.64 (back to 1.1.70).
Either kernel have been very stable and have had no problems with them.
I don't think it's my kernel.  As well as dosemu I have been monkeying
around with a dummy terminal.  This problem came up suddenly and without
warning. If someone has any clue what this could be please let me know.

I have tried renaming the utmp files and rebooting without them. this
changed the error message from problem 1, but had no other effect so I
re-renamed the files.  I have booted from a root/boot disk and checked all
of my filesystems and all is well there also.

sorry for being sooooo long winded
Bill

2. make money while surfing!!! 103808

3. How to eliminate idle time from "finger"/"w" commands ?

4. Memory requirements

5. Error for "w" and "ps" commands

6. sed: insert page break

7. Strange "w", "who" and "uptime" output

8. UID for at command missing

9. how to hide your process from "w" command??

10. 1509 days idle in "w" command

11. The "w" command

12. Problems with "w" command.

13. Regarding the "w" command