Unix Question

Unix Question

Post by Heid » Sun, 04 Aug 1996 04:00:00



Dear Expert,
I am running UNIX (BSDI) software on PC, recently I had a disk problem
which generated a lot of errors.  The disk could not be repaired, so I
decided to place a new disk and restore system from the backup tape
which I had.
I restored everything and system is up and running BUT all the users
top directory (.) "when i issue  %ls -alg" belongs to the root wheel and
I know it should belong to user name.
1- what did I do wrong that cause this problem? (so I won't repeat that next
                                                  time)
2- How can I fix this problem as a su?  Do I have to login as root to fix this?

As you know user can login and can read their file but cannot write to the
directory.

I thank you for your help.
Best Regards,
Heidi

 
 
 

Unix Question

Post by Gora Mohan » Wed, 07 Aug 1996 04:00:00



Quote:>Dear Expert,
>I am running UNIX (BSDI) software on PC, recently I had a disk problem
>which generated a lot of errors.  The disk could not be repaired, so I
>decided to place a new disk and restore system from the backup tape
>which I had.
>I restored everything and system is up and running BUT all the users
>top directory (.) "when i issue  %ls -alg" belongs to the root wheel and
>I know it should belong to user name.
>1- what did I do wrong that cause this problem? (so I won't repeat that next
>                                                  time)

You probably backed up stuff as root and your backup system did not preserve
file ownerships/permissions or you did not preserve these during the restore.
It is hard to say what to without knowing your backup system---refer to its
documentation. For example, the GNU version of tar has the --same-owner and
--preserve-permissions flags for this.

Quote:>2- How can I fix this problem as a su?  Do I have to login as root to fix

this?

/etc/chown username user_home_dir

should fix the top-level ownership problems with the user home directories.
Yes, you have to be root if these files are now owned by root.  You probably
have other problems below that which will be hard to fix.
                                     Regards,
                                         Gora

 
 
 

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