How to convert Unix date to DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM:SS

How to convert Unix date to DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM:SS

Post by Niza » Fri, 11 May 2001 14:34:37



Hi

Please Help me to convert the Unix date (988074731)
and which format it is stored

Thanks in advance
Nizam

 
 
 

How to convert Unix date to DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM:SS

Post by Ronald Fische » Fri, 11 May 2001 17:46:00



> Please Help me to convert the Unix date (988074731)

for example,

        man strftime

Quote:> and which format it is stored

What do you mean with this question?

Ronald
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How to convert Unix date to DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM:SS

Post by BJ » Sat, 12 May 2001 20:50:13


A perl script :

$stamp = 988074731;
my($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst) =
localtime($stamp);
$year+=1900;
printf "timestamp %d is: %02d/%02d/%d
%02d:%02d:%02d\n",$stamp,$mday,$mon+1,$year,$hour,$min,$sec;

The unix time stamp (also called the epoch) is the number of seconds since
01/01/1970 12:00

Question for you:
What will hapen on 09/09/2001 03:46:40 ?

Have fun,
-BJ-



Quote:> Hi

> Please Help me to convert the Unix date (988074731)
> and which format it is stored

> Thanks in advance
> Nizam

 
 
 

How to convert Unix date to DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM:SS

Post by Lew Pitch » Sat, 12 May 2001 21:18:23



Quote:>A perl script :

>$stamp = 988074731;
>my($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst) =
>localtime($stamp);
>$year+=1900;
>printf "timestamp %d is: %02d/%02d/%d
>%02d:%02d:%02d\n",$stamp,$mday,$mon+1,$year,$hour,$min,$sec;

>The unix time stamp (also called the epoch) is the number of seconds since
>01/01/1970 12:00

>Question for you:
>What will hapen on 09/09/2001 03:46:40 ?

Let me guess: one-billion seconds will have elapsed in the Unix time
epoch?

Now one for you: What date and time will it be when the Unix time
rolls over and becomes negative (assuming 32bit signed integers)?



>> Hi

>> Please Help me to convert the Unix date (988074731)
>> and which format it is stored

>> Thanks in advance
>> Nizam

Lew Pitcher, Information Technology Consultant, Toronto Dominion Bank Financial Group

(Opinions expressed are my own, not my employer's.)

 
 
 

How to convert Unix date to DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM:SS

Post by BJ » Sat, 12 May 2001 23:21:41


That's easy (but a good point, nevertheless)

It will be on 19/01/2038 04:14:07

I can think of some problems that could arise from this !
Wonder what impact this will have on the unix-community.
Luckily I'll be enjoying my pension then.

Has anybody conceived a name for this moment in time?

-BJ-



Quote:

> >Question for you:
> >What will hapen on 09/09/2001 03:46:40 ?

> Let me guess: one-billion seconds will have elapsed in the Unix time
> epoch?

> Now one for you: What date and time will it be when the Unix time
> rolls over and becomes negative (assuming 32bit signed integers)?

 
 
 

How to convert Unix date to DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM:SS

Post by Chuck Geigne » Sun, 13 May 2001 06:15:19


<snp>

Quote:> Has anybody conceived a name for this moment in time?

how about "Le maltemps de oops"

--
Chuck Geigner ---------------------------------------
AIX Sysop
Milner Library, Illinois State Univ.
"Been borrowing Occam's shaving instrument since 1992
Haven't cut myself yet."_____________#rgvac==mongoose

 
 
 

How to convert Unix date to DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM:SS

Post by Jeremiah DeWitt Weine » Thu, 17 May 2001 02:57:35



> It will be on 19/01/2038 04:14:07
> I can think of some problems that could arise from this !
> Wonder what impact this will have on the unix-community.
> Luckily I'll be enjoying my pension then.
> Has anybody conceived a name for this moment in time?

        I've heard it called "the epoch", although that term is more properly
applied to time_t = 0.  The end of the epoch, maybe?  Frankly, I doubt it
will be too much of a problem, certainly no more than Y2K.  We've got 37
years to prepare, and how much technology is around today that was in use in
1964?  I suspect there will still be some 32-bit embedded systems lurking in
dark corners, but we'll just have to wait and see.

JDW