C programmer wants to learn unix programming

C programmer wants to learn unix programming

Post by Alok Kum » Wed, 28 Aug 2002 12:37:39



Although I have been programming in C on unix since the past 4 years,
the programs I write are at the level of database access, string
manipulaion etc. There is hardly any unix specific code that I have
written.

With things being what they are, as soon as you say "unix" to an
interviewer, they start asking about fork(), shmget(), the works.

While I know about these functions, I hardly use them in code as all
IPC and os specific functionality is handled by a separate layer in
the product I work on.

However since I do program on unix, and love doing it, I want to
increase my knowledge, and expertise in unix specific programming.
This I think would lead me to
* greater understanding of how the programs I currently write work,
* additional skills that would help in job interviews

At the same time there is nil opportunity for me to do such
programming at work. I have a red hat 7.1 installation at home, and
Stevens' a.p.u.e.

What kind of approach would you suggest apart from going page by page
of a.p.u.e (which I am currently doing and which I think is not a
substitute for a live project)?

tia
Alok

 
 
 

C programmer wants to learn unix programming

Post by David Schwart » Wed, 28 Aug 2002 12:50:29



> What kind of approach would you suggest apart from going page by page
> of a.p.u.e (which I am currently doing and which I think is not a
> substitute for a live project)?

        Page-by-page through apue is a great start. It may help if for each
significant section you think of something interesting to do with the
new stuff you learned and give it a shot. You should also think about
learning how to write multithreaded code.

        DS

 
 
 

C programmer wants to learn unix programming

Post by Joe Halpi » Wed, 28 Aug 2002 22:01:45



> What kind of approach would you suggest apart from going page by
> page of a.p.u.e (which I am currently doing and which I think is not
> a substitute for a live project)?

In my opinion, the best thing to do is pick something you're
interested in, and write an application to do it. Rewrite it a few
different ways, using the functionality you want to explore.

That would be in addition to going through APUE, of course. Don't lose
that book.

Joe

 
 
 

C programmer wants to learn unix programming

Post by Paul Pluzhniko » Thu, 29 Aug 2002 00:05:07




> > What kind of approach would you suggest apart from going page by
> > page of a.p.u.e (which I am currently doing and which I think is not
> > a substitute for a live project)?

> In my opinion, the best thing to do is pick something you're
> interested in, and write an application to do it. Rewrite it a few
> different ways, using the functionality you want to explore.

Alternatively, pick an open-source application which is already useful,
for which you have no idea how it works, and which has a TODO list...

IMHO a great way to learn about some of the low-level stuff is to study
strace or ltrace.

Study/understand it, then implement something from the TODO.
Don't expect your implementation to be accepted though ;-(

Quote:

> That would be in addition to going through APUE, of course. Don't lose
> that book.

Seconded.

Cheers,
--
In order to understand recursion you must first understand recursion.

 
 
 

C programmer wants to learn unix programming

Post by Alok Kum » Thu, 29 Aug 2002 20:54:00


Quote:> Alternatively, pick an open-source application which is already useful,
> for which you have no idea how it works, and which has a TODO list...

> IMHO a great way to learn about some of the low-level stuff is to study
> strace or ltrace.

> Study/understand it, then implement something from the TODO.
> Don't expect your implementation to be accepted though ;-(

Many thanks.
Can you tell me how to find out about open source projects that want contributors?
I know it's got something to do with that freshmeat site, but I could be wrong ...
Alok
 
 
 

C programmer wants to learn unix programming

Post by ADENIRAN Ismai » Fri, 30 Aug 2002 01:15:08


The book "Practical Unix Programming" by  Kay Robbins and 'another'
Robbins has chapters devoted to different projects in it. You can cut
your teeth on these.

Isma;il

--

Recursion can be a useful way to express a solution -- but not
in the wrong hands.
                                 Eric Sosman