Austin Group Frequently Asked Questions

Austin Group Frequently Asked Questions

Post by Andrew Jose » Tue, 17 Jun 2003 20:44:12



[I was posting these previously to comp.std.unix but that appears
to now be defunct - AJ]

Austin Group Frequently Asked Questions

Last Updated : Jun 14 2003: freq.ques,v 1.9

This document can be found on the world wide web at
http://www.opengroup.org/austin/faq.html.

This article includes answers to the following.

Q0. What is the Austin Group?
Q1. Is there a description of the project describing the scope?
Q2. Where can I download the specifications from?
Q3. What are the restrictions on the draft?
Q4. How do I become a participant in the Austin Group?
Q5. Who else is participating in the Austin Group?
Q6. Are there minutes available from meetings of the group?
Q7. Are there procedures for the operation of the group?
Q8. Where is the schedule for draft development?
Q9. Are there meetings? Can any one attend?
Q10. How can I find out where the next meeting is ?
Q11. What is aardvark?
Q12. How can I submit a comment against the specifications?
Q13. I filed an aardvark but did not see a copy on the mailing list. Problem?
Q14. Does this project have an IEEE Project number ?
Q15. What happened to the existing POSIX 1003.1-1990 and POSIX
1003.2-1992 standards when this revision completed?
Q16. I can not attend meetings , how do I get my point of view listened to?
Q17. What are the JDOCS procedures?
Q18. How do I join the mailing list?
Q19. How does this effort compare to the Linux Standard Base?
Q20. Does the unification with the Single UNIX Specification mean
the Austin Group specifications are now only relevant to the UNIX
community?
Q21. What are the core technical changes in the Austin Group
specifications over the base documents?
Q22. Were there many interfaces removed in the revision?
Q23. What changed in the handling of options?
Q24. How do I submit a suggestion for inclusion in a future revision
of the specification?
Q25. How do I add a question to this FAQ?

Q0. What is the Austin Group?

The Austin Common Standards Revision Group (CSRG) is a joint technical
working group established to develop and maintain a common revision
of ISO/IEC 9945-1, ISO/IEC 9945-2, IEEE Std 1003.1, IEEE Std 1003.2
and the appropriate parts of the Single UNIX Specification.

The approach to specification development is "write once, adopt
everywhere", with the deliverables being a set of specifications
that carry simultaneously the IEEE POSIX designation, The Open Group's
Technical Standard designation, and the ISO/IEC designation.

The new set of specifications forms the core of the Single UNIX
Specification Version 3, and was delivered development complete in
June 2001. This unique development combines both the industry led
efforts and the formal wide spectrum of participants. The specification
was approved by The Open Group on September 12 2001, as the Base
Specifications, Issue 6, by the IEEE on December 6th 2001 as IEEE
Std 1003.1-2001, and by ISO/IEC as ISO/IEC 9945:2002 in November
2002. The specification was published during early 2002, and is
available in hardcopy, electronically (including on the web in html,
see later) and on CDROM.

Having completed the initial deliverable, the group is presently
working on maintenance activities (which recently included delivery
of the 2003 edition of the standard incorporating Technical Corrigendum
1 , known as TC1).

The IEEE and The Open Group 2003 edition of the standard was published
on March 31st 2003, and updates the standard to include Technical
Corrigendum 1 (TC1). The 2003 Edition is formally known as:

    IEEE Std 1003.1, 2003 Edition
    The Open Group Technical Standard Base Specifications, Issue 6

    Includes IEEE Std 1003.1-2001 and IEEE Std 1003.1-2001/Cor 1-2002

and its worth noting that within the text the standard is still
referred to as IEEE Std 1003.1-2001.

TC1 has passed its ballot at ISO, and the 2003 edition text has
been prepared with the ISO/IEC covers and submitted to the ISO
secretariat. ISO/IEC publication of the 2003 edition is targeted
for June or July. The active work item is now Technical Corrigenda
2. The draft scope and purpose have been produced which will be
submitted to the IEEE for approval. We expect TC2 to be targeted
for IEEE approval in December 2003.

Q1. Is there a description of the project describing the scope?

Yes, see Austin/9 in the document register

URL: http://www.opengroup.org/austin/docs/austin_9r6.txt.

A scope for Technical Corrigendum Number 1 (TC1), which addresses
bugs in the final standard is available

URL: http://www.opengroup.org/austin/docs/austin_113r1.txt.

The scope for TC2 is technically identical to TC1.

Q2. Where can I download the specifications from?

Ongoing draft specifications are available online from the Austin
Group web site at http://www.opengroup.org/austin/ . You need to
be a member of the Austin Group. Information on how to join the
group is on the web site.

URL: http://www.opengroup.org/austin/. (Austin Group Home Page)

Copies of the final standard can also be obtained either from The
IEEE (search on 1003.1-2001) , The Open Group (Look for documents
T031,C031,C032,C033,C034) or ISO (look for ISO/IEC 9945:2002 parts
1 thru 4). It is freely available in pdf format to members of the
Open Group from the Open Group publications catalog. If you wish
to signup up your organization to become a member of The Open Group
and are an active participant you can sign up for no fee here. If
you want to join as an individual please contact Andrew Josey
directly.

The html version of the standard is freely available, we request
you to register at URL:http://www.unix-systems.org/version3/

Q3. What are the restrictions on the draft?

See the copyright notice on the documents and the notice at
http://www.opengroup.org/austin/login.html . Downloading the draft
is taken as agreement to abide by the stated terms and conditions.
In brief you need to be a participant in the Austin Group in order
to download the drafts.

URL: http://www.opengroup.org/austin/login.html (Copyright Notice)

All queries regarding permission to reproduce sections of the
standard should be sent to austin-group-permissions at Open Group
. Permission needs to be granted by both copyright holders, The
IEEE and The Open Group.

Q4. How do I become a participant in the Austin Group?

To participate you need to join the Austin Group. See
http://www.opengroup.org/austin/lists.html for more information.

URL: http://www.opengroup.org/austin/lists.html. (How to Join the
Austin Group)

Q5. Who else is participating in the Austin Group?

A list of participants can be queried from the mailing list information
page at http://www.opengroup.org/austin/lists.html As of June 2003,
there are approximately 600 participants from over 125 organizations.

Q6. Are there minutes and documents available from meetings of the group?

Yes the group makes all its documentation publically available in
the document register.

URL: http://www.opengroup.org/austin/docreg.html. (the Document Register)

Q7. Are there procedures for the operation of the group?

Yes, there are two sets of procedures.

   1. How the group operates without the politics -
      URL: http://www.opengroup.org/austin/docs/austin_26.txt.

   2. How the group operates with respect to the IEEE, ISO/IEC
   SC22/WG15 and the Open Group.
      URL: http://www.opengroup.org/austin/docs/austin_14r2.pdf

This second document is also known as the JDOCS procedures.

The procedures for maintenance of the approved standard and future
revision are in Austin/112r1 URL:
http://www.opengroup.org/austin/docs/austin_112r1.txt

Q8. Where is the schedule for draft development?

Development of the main standard is now complete, in brief the
schedule was for seven drafts with technical completion in June
2001. Draft 4 was the first feature set complete draft. Draft 6 was
the Sanity review. Draft 7 was intended as the final draft. Now
that The Open Group , IEEE and ISO have approved the standard the
group is concentrating on maintaining the standard and producing
Technical Corrigenda and interpretations. The first technical
corrigenda, Technical Corrigenda number 1 (TC 1) was completed in
December 2002. The 2003 Edition of the standard incorporating TC1
was published on March 31 2003. TC2 is expected to complete in
December 2003.

URL: http://www.opengroup.org/austin/docs/austin_169.html. (Status)

Q9. Are there meetings? Can any one attend?

Yes there are meetings or teleconferences after each draft review
period. The purpose of these meetings is comment resolution and
project planning. These are open meetings and anyone can attend.
For face to face meetings, an agenda is circulated at least thirty
days in advance of the meeting and minutes are kept for each meeting.
For face to face meetings there is always a teleconference bridge
for those unable to attend to participate. For the teleconferences
we provide a freecall US number.

Q10. How can I find out where the next meeting is ?

Check the Austin Group web site (http://www.opengroup.org/austin),
face to face meetings are announced at least 30 days in advance on
the main page. There are also periodic teleconferences to review
defect reports.

Q11. What is aardvark?

Aardvark is the commenting format used to review the drafts. It is
also being used for the defect reporting mechanism on the final
standard. The use of a standard format facilitates automated collation
of multiple comments from multiple parties against a large volume
of materials (draft 7 was 3600 pages+), into a sorted change request
report. Specific information on the format can be found at the
aardvark web page.

URL: http://www.opengroup.org/austin/aardvark/aardvark.html (Aardvark
information)

Q12. How can I submit a comment against the specifications?

For defects in the final text of the specification, please use the
defect reporting form. Go to
http://www.opengroup.org/austin/defectform.html . This page also
gives alternate instructions for defect report submission using
email rather than the web.

URL: http://www.opengroup.org/austin/defectform.html (How to report
a defect)

For bugs in the Technical Corrigenda, use the bug reporting form
which is separate from the defect reporting form. A URL is located
with each draft corrigenda stating its location.

Q13. I filed an aardvark but did not see a copy on the mailing list. Problem?

No problem. There is a different list. The incoming aardvark are
sent to the Austin-Review mailing list. The purpose of this list
is only for circulation of aardvark comments, and of aardvark change
request reports (generated by the editorial team).

Q14. Does this project have an IEEE Project number ?

Yes, on 26th June 1999 the IEEE Standards Board approved the project
authorization request and designated the number P1003.1.

On August 15th 2002, the IEEE Standards Board approved the technical
corrigendum project authorization request with the designation:

P1003.1-2001/Cor 1-200x Standard for Information Technology --
Portable Operating System Interface (POSIX) -- Technical Corrigendum
Number 1

Q15. What happened to the existing POSIX 1003.1-1990 and POSIX
1003.2-1992 standards when this revision completed?

Since the material contained in the existing POSIX 1003.1 and POSIX
1003.2 standards is merged into the revision, POSIX 1003.1-1990 and
its amendments, and POSIX 1003.2-1992 and its amendments were
administratively withdrawn by the IEEE.

Q16. I can not attend meetings , how do I get my point of view
listened to?

Firstly, if the point can be described concisely with specific
actions to remedy, then the recommended solution is to file an
aardvark that will then be considered at the review meeting.

Secondly, if you are not sure about a problem and how to solve it,
the first course of action is to start a discussion on the austin-group
mailing list, and then if necessary to approach your designated
Organizational Representative as per the JDOCS procedures to raise
the matter on your behalf at a review meeting.

It is also possible to contact the chair to arrange an agenda slot
for the review meeting where you can teleconference in with the
review group.

Q17. What are the JDOCS procedures?

This is a tri-party set of procedures for operation of the joint
group. The three organizations are IEEE PASC, The Open Group and
ISO/IEC SC22 WG15. In brief, these procedures layout the basic
principles and high level operating rules for the group, and issue
resolution procedures .

URL: http://www.opengroup.org/austin/docs/austin_14.pdf

Q18. How do I join the mailing list?

URL: http://www.opengroup.org/austin/lists.html. (How to Join the
Austin Group)

Q19. How does this effort compare to the Linux Standard Base?

The Austin Group documents specify application programming interfaces
(APIs) at the source level, and thus are about source code portability.
They are neither a code implementation nor an operating system, but
a stable definition of a programming interface that those systems
supporting the specification guarantee to provide to the application
programmer. Efforts such as the Linux Standard Base are about binary
portability and define a specific binary implementation of an
interface to operating system services. It also worth bearing in
mind that at the time of writing the LSB specifications are not
based on the latest version of the joint document, but the Single
UNIX Specification Version 2. They are expected to uplift to the
Single UNIX Specification Version 3 for LSB 2.

Q20. Does the unification with the Single UNIX Specification mean
the Austin Group specifications are now only relevant to the UNIX
community?

No, the additional features to support version 3 of the Single UNIX
Specification have been added as an option (the XSI option). The
core POSIX interfaces still comprise a series of options allowing
a minimal implementation, and with the subprofiling standards such
as POSIX 1003.13 and its revision (currently in progress), the
Austin Group specifications are relevant as the open industry
standard source API for embedded real-time devices and controllers.

For a good description of the modular options in the Austin Group
specification see URL:
http://people.redhat.com/~drepper/posix-option-groups.html

Q21. What are the core technical changes in the Austin Group
specifications over the base documents?

The main changes are as follows: alignment with ISO/IEC 9899:1999
(ISO C), support for IPv6, integration of recent POSIX realtime
amendments ( 1003.1d, 1003.1j, 1003.1q), amendments to the core
POSIX functionality from the 1003.2b and 1003.1a amendments,
application of technical corrigendum from The Open Group and IEEE
interpretations, revision of options , removal of obsolescent and
legacy interfaces.

Q22. Were there many interfaces removed in the revision?

Interfaces that were previously marked as obsolescent or Legacy
(with The Open Group Base documents), and thus where due warning
has been given to application programmers have been removed in this
revision. The long scope document gives a list of the affected
interfaces. The biggest single affected technical area was the
removal of the XTI interfaces which were not merged from the original
Networking base documents (these interfaces had been marked as
deprecated in XNS5.2). The only exception to this has been the c89
utility that has been removed and superseded by c99. In a small
number of cases some interfaces have been marked Legacy or obsolescent
in this revision to warn the application programmer that alternate
interfaces should be used when writing new applications and that
these interfaces may be removed in a future revision.

Q23. What changed in the handling of options?

The FIPS 151-2 options were made mandatory in the revision, for
example mandating support for job control and supplementary groups.
New options were introduced for support of the recent POSIX amendments
1003.1d, 1003.1j and 1003.1q, support for IPv6, support for raw
sockets and support for the X/Open System Interface extension (for
support of version 3 of the Single UNIX Specification). The
Reader/Writer locks option has been merged into the Threads option,
and a new XSI STREAMS option was broken out from the X/Open System
Interface

Q24. How do I submit a suggestion for inclusion in a future revision
of the specification?

The procedures for inclusion of new features in a future revision
are in Austin/112r1. You can also email suggestions to
austin-group-futures-l at The Open Group.  URL:
http://www.opengroup.org/austin/docs/austin_112r1.txt

Q25. How do I add a question to this FAQ?

Send the question (preferably with a proposed answer) to Andrew
Josey.

--
Andrew Josey, #include <disclaimer.h>
Austin Group Chair.  ajosey at The Open Group

 
 
 

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