Q: Multiprocessor support

Q: Multiprocessor support

Post by Shura Fomiche » Sat, 16 May 1998 04:00:00



Hi, everybody!

My problem is the following:

I'm going to purchase a new server for my company. The primary role of
this server is to be a rather high-efficient file- and printserver for
two subnetworks containing ~50 workstations (W95 & NT). I'm about to
order something like that:
Dual Pentium II - 233,
RAM 256M,
Mylex 960PDU disk array controller with 2 HDDs 18G each and configure
them as a stripe-set (without redundancy)
2 netcards 3Com 595.

I want to know:

     a) Will the FreeBSD's 2.2.5 kernel support 2 CPU?
     b) If yes, are there any configuration/compilation tricks?

I'll be thankful for any response.

                                                            Shura
                                                            Fomichev

PS. I'm a newbie in FreeBSD. I have installed two FreeBSD servers at my
location only a month ago (the main reason - getting tired from MS
environment). Additionally, I'll be thankul for any help information.

 
 
 

Q: Multiprocessor support

Post by Morten A. Middeltho » Sat, 16 May 1998 04:00:00


No, not 2.2.5, but 3.0-SNAP
Check out http://www.freebsd.org/~fsmp/SMP/SMP.html for more info

Morten A. Middelthon


> blah-blah....

>      a) Will the FreeBSD's 2.2.5 kernel support 2 CPU?
>      b) If yes, are there any configuration/compilation tricks?

> I'll be thankful for any response.

>                                                             Shura
>                                                             Fomichev



 
 
 

Q: Multiprocessor support

Post by stephen farrel » Sun, 17 May 1998 04:00:00



> I'm going to purchase a new server for my company. The primary role of
> this server is to be a rather high-efficient file- and printserver for
> two subnetworks containing ~50 workstations (W95 & NT). I'm about to
> order something like that:
> Dual Pentium II - 233,
> RAM 256M,
> Mylex 960PDU disk array controller with 2 HDDs 18G each and configure
> them as a stripe-set (without redundancy)
> 2 netcards 3Com 595.

Hmm... SMP is not supported in 2.2, and 3.0 is not the most stable
thing in the world right now.  Why not get a single PII/400?  Perhaps
get a dual CPU motherboard and add another CPU at a later date?  Also
intel and dec ethernets are usually favored over the 3com...

--sf

 
 
 

Q: Multiprocessor support

Post by Andrew Boothma » Sun, 17 May 1998 04:00:00



> Also
> intel and dec ethernets are usually favored over the 3com...

Why's that?

I'm going to have to get ethernet cards for 2 486s soon, and I was
wondering which are the best to go for.

The handbook mentions NE2000 cards. But will I run into problems if I
just go and get a really cheap NE2000-compatable card?

Would I be better going for a more expensive card?

Thanks!
--

(http://easyweb.easynet.co.uk/~boothman/andrew/)
"Yahoo is a search engine.
 Netanyahoo is an Israeli search engine"
            -Robin Williams

 
 
 

Q: Multiprocessor support

Post by Mike Squir » Mon, 18 May 1998 04:00:00



Quote:>Hi, everybody!

>My problem is the following:

>I'm going to purchase a new server for my company. The primary role of
>this server is to be a rather high-efficient file- and printserver for
>two subnetworks containing ~50 workstations (W95 & NT). I'm about to
>order something like that:
>Dual Pentium II - 233,
>RAM 256M,
>Mylex 960PDU disk array controller with 2 HDDs 18G each and configure
>them as a stripe-set (without redundancy)
>2 netcards 3Com 595.

I don't think you're going to need two CPUs.

Our experience with the 3C595 under Windows NT has been bad; of the 14
systems 2 crash regularly and lock up not only themselves but other
systems on the same network.  The 3C595 is listed in the MS NT
hardware compatbility list as not being suitable for fast systems.

According to MS the only fix is to turn off bus mastering, which is
documented in their KB.

It also does not handle multicasts correctly, at least in the version
we got with our systems.

The Intel Pro100B has run completely reliably for me under FreeBSD; a
clone card using the DEC 21140 chipset has also worked well (Accton).

(I didn't like the 3C501, 3C503, 3C509, or 3C579 in comparison to other
cards available at the time; I haven't seen anything with the 3C595 or
even the 3C905 to convince me otherwise.)

 
 
 

Q: Multiprocessor support

Post by Chris Maurit » Mon, 18 May 1998 04:00:00




>>Hi, everybody!

>>My problem is the following:

>>I'm going to purchase a new server for my company. The primary role of
>>this server is to be a rather high-efficient file- and printserver for
>>two subnetworks containing ~50 workstations (W95 & NT). I'm about to
>>order something like that:
>>Dual Pentium II - 233,
>>RAM 256M,
>>Mylex 960PDU disk array controller with 2 HDDs 18G each and configure
>>them as a stripe-set (without redundancy)
>>2 netcards 3Com 595.
> I don't think you're going to need two CPUs.
> Our experience with the 3C595 under Windows NT has been bad; of the 14
> systems 2 crash regularly and lock up not only themselves but other
> systems on the same network.  The 3C595 is listed in the MS NT
> hardware compatbility list as not being suitable for fast systems.
> According to MS the only fix is to turn off bus mastering, which is
> documented in their KB.
> It also does not handle multicasts correctly, at least in the version
> we got with our systems.
> The Intel Pro100B has run completely reliably for me under FreeBSD; a
> clone card using the DEC 21140 chipset has also worked well (Accton).
> (I didn't like the 3C501, 3C503, 3C509, or 3C579 in comparison to other
> cards available at the time; I haven't seen anything with the 3C595 or
> even the 3C905 to convince me otherwise.)

Alternatively, simply buy a Netgear 10/100 ethernet card based on
the DEC tulip chipset.  It is well supported by both linux and
FreeBSD and they cost only about US$30 each.  It also happens to
be a very fast card.

C
--
Crack the RSA RC5-64 encryption algorithm.  Use your idle cpu
cycles to take part in the fastest computer on the planet.
See:   http://www.distributed.net
Join:  http://www.execpc.com/~silby/teamamd.html

 
 
 

Q: Multiprocessor support

Post by Joseph M. Scot » Tue, 19 May 1998 04:00:00


We've had some real bad luck with 3com cards at our office.  Out of the
4 that we have 2 have died.  We've pretty much decided to stick with the
intel 10/100's for any new machines.  Although we do have a few generic
ne2000's floating around.  The only problem I've run into is you need to
make sure you use their config disk to set the IRQ and address correctly
( they've all been ISA cards ), the ones we got came with strange
default settings.  Other than that the NE2000's have worked great.  (
Although I still like the intel's better )

Joseph Scott



> > Also
> > intel and dec ethernets are usually favored over the 3com...

> Why's that?

> I'm going to have to get ethernet cards for 2 486s soon, and I was
> wondering which are the best to go for.

> The handbook mentions NE2000 cards. But will I run into problems if I
> just go and get a really cheap NE2000-compatable card?

> Would I be better going for a more expensive card?

> Thanks!
> --

> (http://easyweb.easynet.co.uk/~boothman/andrew/)
> "Yahoo is a search engine.
>  Netanyahoo is an Israeli search engine"
>             -Robin Williams

 
 
 

Q: Multiprocessor support

Post by Steve Sheld » Tue, 19 May 1998 04:00:00



 Wow, which specific 3Com cards have you had problems with?

 I've had great luck with 3c509 and 3c905 cards on client desktops.

 I have used NE2000 cards in my test machines at home and they work ok.  But
I have found through experimentation that 3c509 cards are considerable
faster with less CPU overhead, so I've begun replacing my NE2000 cards.

 I have had good luck with Intel cards as well, easy to configure, good
performance, good support.

I refuse to touch anything hardware related that comes from DEC.  They've
built a good CPU with the Alpha, it's too bad the rest of the hardware
surrounding it is complete junk. :(

Just my two cents,
Steve

>We've had some real bad luck with 3com cards at our office.  Out of the
>4 that we have 2 have died.  We've pretty much decided to stick with the
>intel 10/100's for any new machines.  Although we do have a few generic
>ne2000's floating around.  The only problem I've run into is you need to
>make sure you use their config disk to set the IRQ and address correctly
>( they've all been ISA cards ), the ones we got came with strange
>default settings.  Other than that the NE2000's have worked great.  (
>Although I still like the intel's better )
>Joseph Scott



>> > Also
>> > intel and dec ethernets are usually favored over the 3com...

>> Why's that?

>> I'm going to have to get ethernet cards for 2 486s soon, and I was
>> wondering which are the best to go for.

>> The handbook mentions NE2000 cards. But will I run into problems if I
>> just go and get a really cheap NE2000-compatable card?

>> Would I be better going for a more expensive card?

>> Thanks!
>> --

>> (http://easyweb.easynet.co.uk/~boothman/andrew/)
>> "Yahoo is a search engine.
>>  Netanyahoo is an Israeli search engine"
>>             -Robin Williams