FreeBSD 2.1 Documentation and Installation of "Everything" to 2.1 Gig drive.

FreeBSD 2.1 Documentation and Installation of "Everything" to 2.1 Gig drive.

Post by Chris K. Skinne » Thu, 23 May 1996 04:00:00



Dear documenting dudes for freebsd,

Hi.  Nice job so far.

Warning: I'm only a Dos/Windows C-programmin' dude
with minimal UNIX going on in my head.

The learning curve for me is big because of the following:

1.  There are configuration files all over the place, each one with a
    different name or "file extension" and so on.  

2.  The existing sysinstall facility just gets you started and leaves a
    bunch of configuration items incomplete: samba, DNS/named
    configuration, NFS client/server software, routed, apache, and
    other of the distribution packages.  Re-configuration seems not
    to take into consideration existing settings and overwrites some
    hand-crafted settings with the old, non-functional defaults.

3.  X-windows:  wow--it's quite a bit different than Win3.1x or Win95!

For items 1, 2, 3, I bought the BSD Docs Walnut Creek CD-Rom, but it
did not have direct answers to questions like:

1.  What is the name of each config file and its location?
2.  Does one edit each config file or is there a config utility
    program to manipulate the file?
3.  For 2 or more example installation complexity levels, what are the
    key elements to understand about the each type of config file
    on the system?  Give at least a beginner, and an intermediate example.
4.  What are the differences between X-windows and MS-windows?  Like how
    do ya start the darned thing?  (I had to get an e-mail reply
    to tell me that you do a startx command to get going!)  Exclude the
    obvious user interface operational differences and concentrate on the
    setup of the environment and the configuration of a couple of X-
    applications such as Netscape 2.02 for BSD.  Test your example
    setup steps.  What steps can be made to bridge any deficiencies
    that X-windows might not have over MS-windows like file type
    associations, OLE2, TTFonts, DDE, NetDDE, filesharing, icon
    files in a program manager or file manager user interface
    shell program--I dunno, I'm no expert--other stuff?
5.  What are the major configuration choices that have to be made?  What
    impact will these decisions have on operation of the system at a
    later stage (as the disk gets full or other)?

I found that I have re-installed the software 5 times now.  Each time I
do it, I correct for a bad answer that I gave the first several times.
This might be OK if I had a Pentium Pro 200 MHz with 512 Mbytes Ram and
a 12x speed CD-Rom, but I don't and the process each time takes a couple
of hours to do.  The first couple of times no harm was done to the
configuration, but the latter few times cause a bunch of the customized
configuration files and user setups to be stepped-on and overwritten with
the default crap.

I chose the defaults for the file partitioning/disk labeling process, but it
turned out that the "Everything install" that I did ran out of /var or /tmp
or / root disk file blocks and got a disk full error in the middle of
unpacking distribution apps.  I examined which of the items ran out, then
I multiplied the default by 10 to get a bit of head room for the
next install attempt.  30 Mbytes turned into 300 Mbytes.  The frigging thing
ought to install its 700 Mbytes into a 2.1 Gig drive that has a 440 Mbyte
Dos partition already setup?

The sysinstall program is amazing!  But maybe it does too much all at once
for configuring the system.  Perhaps it should be segmented into a
couple of standard components that call "plug and play"-type scripts
from the application being installed so that each item can not only
be copied to the disk, but configured and maybe test launched
(after some context info is saved to disk if re-booting is required).

Microsoft has steadily improved its installation mechanisms so that
applications are easy to install.  INI files and system registration
database file(s) are in the Windows directory and aren't scattered
all over the place.  Paths to application executables are frequently
not required because the application group/icon/short-cut files
contain the setup context required for each application to be
launched correctly.  Now, re-booting/re-starting MS-windows is less
required than it used to be.  Settings are re-read and
refresh the existing run-time session.  When certain disk drive
mappings change, short-cut files have the changes propagated to them.

Some positive things about FreeBSD:

1. When somebody buys the CDs, they seem to get a good lot of
   stuff to start out with and for very nearly zero cost!
2. The mount_msdos capability seems to even be able to read
   Extended "On-track Disk Manager" partitions of MS-Dos file
   systems (I have not fully tested this but...).
3. No need to use any large disk translation schemes to beat the
   1024 cylinder barrier that Dos has imposed for years.
4. If you've got the requisite supported hardware, installation
   proceeds fairly painlessly compared to Linux because the
   hardware detection probes seem to work fairly reasonably.
   It is on par with Win95 or very nearly.

In an effort to make the learning curve less trial and error,
I've purchased the "Linux Network Administrator's Guide" from
O'Reilly & Assc.  I was going to by the "DNS and Bind" book but
it cost nearly $10 more and was less broad in its scope.  I've
only just got the thing and so have not read it cover to cover.

I hear that there is a 5 volume set (one with CD Rom(s) and one
without).  The cost is US$150 so I was quoted CDN$220 by a
bookstore here in Ottawa.  Anybody got any comments about the
set--do they go out of date too quickly to be worth the
money?

A question for Walnut Creek support:  what's the 2nd BSD 2.1
CD-Rom for; I've looked at it but it seems to have similar stuff
on it as the first one?

TIA for any positive development any of y'alls can give.  Regards,
Chris K. Skinner.

 
 
 

FreeBSD 2.1 Documentation and Installation of "Everything" to 2.1 Gig drive.

Post by Chris K. Skinne » Thu, 23 May 1996 04:00:00


Dear documenting dudes for freebsd,

Hi.  Nice job so far.

Warning: I'm only a Dos/Windows C-programmin' dude
with minimal UNIX going on in my head.

The learning curve for me is big because of the following:

1.  There are configuration files all over the place, each one with a
    different name or "file extension" and so on.  

2.  The existing sysinstall facility just gets you started and leaves a
    bunch of configuration items incomplete: samba, DNS/named
    configuration, NFS client/server software, routed, apache, and
    other of the distribution packages.  Re-configuration seems not
    to take into consideration existing settings and overwrites some
    hand-crafted settings with the old, non-functional defaults.

3.  X-windows:  wow--it's quite a bit different than Win3.1x or Win95!

For items 1, 2, 3, I bought the BSD Docs Walnut Creek CD-Rom, but it
did not have direct answers to questions like:

1.  What is the name of each config file and its location?
2.  Does one edit each config file or is there a config utility
    program to manipulate the file?
3.  For 2 or more example installation complexity levels, what are the
    key elements to understand about the each type of config file
    on the system?  Give at least a beginner, and an intermediate example.
4.  What are the differences between X-windows and MS-windows?  Like how
    do ya start the darned thing?  (I had to get an e-mail reply
    to tell me that you do a startx command to get going!)  Exclude the
    obvious user interface operational differences and concentrate on the
    setup of the environment and the configuration of a couple of X-
    applications such as Netscape 2.02 for BSD.  Test your example
    setup steps.  What steps can be made to bridge any deficiencies
    that X-windows might not have over MS-windows like file type
    associations, OLE2, TTFonts, DDE, NetDDE, filesharing, icon
    files in a program manager or file manager user interface
    shell program--I dunno, I'm no expert--other stuff?
5.  What are the major configuration choices that have to be made?  What
    impact will these decisions have on operation of the system at a
    later stage (as the disk gets full or other)?

I found that I have re-installed the software 5 times now.  Each time I
do it, I correct for a bad answer that I gave the first several times.
This might be OK if I had a Pentium Pro 200 MHz with 512 Mbytes Ram and
a 12x speed CD-Rom, but I don't and the process each time takes a couple
of hours to do.  The first couple of times no harm was done to the
configuration, but the latter few times cause a bunch of the customized
configuration files and user setups to be stepped-on and overwritten with
the default crap.

I chose the defaults for the file partitioning/disk labeling process, but it
turned out that the "Everything install" that I did ran out of /var or /tmp
or / root disk file blocks and got a disk full error in the middle of
unpacking distribution apps.  I examined which of the items ran out, then
I multiplied the default by 10 to get a bit of head room for the
next install attempt.  30 Mbytes turned into 300 Mbytes.  The frigging thing
ought to install its 700 Mbytes into a 2.1 Gig drive that has a 440 Mbyte
Dos partition already setup?

The sysinstall program is amazing!  But maybe it does too much all at once
for configuring the system.  Perhaps it should be segmented into a
couple of standard components that call "plug and play"-type scripts
from the application being installed so that each item can not only
be copied to the disk, but configured and maybe test launched
(after some context info is saved to disk if re-booting is required).

Microsoft has steadily improved its installation mechanisms so that
applications are easy to install.  INI files and system registration
database file(s) are in the Windows directory and aren't scattered
all over the place.  Paths to application executables are frequently
not required because the application group/icon/short-cut files
contain the setup context required for each application to be
launched correctly.  Now, re-booting/re-starting MS-windows is less
required than it used to be.  Settings are re-read and
refresh the existing run-time session.  When certain disk drive
mappings change, short-cut files have the changes propagated to them.

Some positive things about FreeBSD:

1. When somebody buys the CDs, they seem to get a good lot of
   stuff to start out with and for very nearly zero cost!
2. The mount_msdos capability seems to even be able to read
   Extended "On-track Disk Manager" partitions of MS-Dos file
   systems (I have not fully tested this but...).
3. No need to use any large disk translation schemes to beat the
   1024 cylinder barrier that Dos has imposed for years.
4. If you've got the requisite supported hardware, installation
   proceeds fairly painlessly compared to Linux because the
   hardware detection probes seem to work fairly reasonably.
   It is on par with Win95 or very nearly.

In an effort to make the learning curve less trial and error,
I've purchased the "Linux Network Administrator's Guide" from
O'Reilly & Assc.  I was going to by the "DNS and Bind" book but
it cost nearly $10 more and was less broad in its scope.  I've
only just got the thing and so have not read it cover to cover.

I hear that there is a 5 volume set (one with CD Rom(s) and one
without).  The cost is US$150 so I was quoted CDN$220 by a
bookstore here in Ottawa.  Anybody got any comments about the
set--do they go out of date too quickly to be worth the
money?

A question for Walnut Creek support:  what's the 2nd BSD 2.1
CD-Rom for; I've looked at it but it seems to have similar stuff
on it as the first one?

TIA for any positive development any of y'alls can give.  Regards,
Chris K. Skinner.

 
 
 

FreeBSD 2.1 Documentation and Installation of "Everything" to 2.1 Gig drive.

Post by gande.. » Fri, 24 May 1996 04:00:00



Quote:>Dear documenting dudes for freebsd,

Well, I'm not one of the 'documenting dudes for FreeBSD', but I might be able to
help...

Quote:>The learning curve for me is big because of the following:

   ...lots of valid, well-articulated comments and questions deleted...

Quote:>In an effort to make the learning curve less trial and error,
>I've purchased the "Linux Network Administrator's Guide" from
>O'Reilly & Assc.  I was going to by the "DNS and Bind" book but
>it cost nearly $10 more and was less broad in its scope.  I've
>only just got the thing and so have not read it cover to cover.

>I hear that there is a 5 volume set (one with CD Rom(s) and one
>without).  The cost is US$150 so I was quoted CDN$220 by a
>bookstore here in Ottawa.  Anybody got any comments about the
>set--do they go out of date too quickly to be worth the
>money?

I'd suggest getting a copy of the 'Unix System Administration Handbook' by Evi,
Nemeth, Seabass, et. al., (I may have the title or author list slightly incorrect).
The latest version that I have seen has a red cover.  Literally everything in the
book works on FreeBSD right out of the box.  The book has a good description of
what happens at boot time, all of the configuration files, how to set up DNS, etc.
I really can't say enough good things about it.

For more indepth info on networking stuff, get a copy of 'TCP/IP Network
Administration' from O'Reilly (again, I may have the title wrong, but if you look
in one of their catalogs, I'm sure you can spot the book).  

Quote:>A question for Walnut Creek support:  what's the 2nd BSD 2.1
>CD-Rom for; I've looked at it but it seems to have similar stuff
>on it as the first one?

Well, I don't work (or speak) for Walnut Creek either, but the second CD is a
live, i.e., mountable, file system.  Once you get the system installed and running,
you can put the second CD in the drive, mount it into your file system, and copy
stuff from it.  I believe that you can also build some of the binaries from it, but
I have not tried this, so I can't say for sure.

Hope this helped,

 
 
 

FreeBSD 2.1 Documentation and Installation of "Everything" to 2.1 Gig drive.

Post by Andreas Kle » Thu, 30 May 1996 04:00:00


In article <4nvf5s$...@nntp.igs.net>,
        "Chris K. Skinner" <cskin...@bml.ca> writes:

>1.  There are configuration files all over the place, each one with a
>    different name or "file extension" and so on.  

The system config files in /etc are pretty standard (BSD 4.4).
There are only some FreeBSD specific ones.

If you mean the config files that are in other places ... well, some
public domain program needs their own config file. And every author
of a PD program has another idea, how long or short or whatever to
call the config files. But since it's free software... don't bother ;)

>2.  The existing sysinstall facility just gets you started and leaves a
>    bunch of configuration items incomplete: samba, DNS/named
>    configuration, NFS client/server software, routed, apache, and
>    other of the distribution packages.  Re-configuration seems not
>    to take into consideration existing settings and overwrites some
>    hand-crafted settings with the old, non-functional defaults.

Well, I think you mean the ports collection installation mechanism:
cd /usr/port/xxx/yyy; make; make install; make clean ;-)

Well, other operating systems don't make it so extremely easy for
the enduser to compile and install a certain software package.

In FreeBSD it is extremely easy to get UNIX pd software compiled
and installed. But the task to configure the software is up to you.
As a maintainer of 8 packages in the ports collection I can tell you,
that it is enough work, to write the Makefile and to make the needed
patches and so on ...

>1.  What is the name of each config file and its location?

Well, for most config files you have a manual page.
        # man filename

Most manual pages have a FILE section, where it is described, what
other important config files or spool directories belong to the
package. Sam for manpages of pd packages.

So I recommend you to buy a good Unix Administration book to get the
basic work managed and for the many pd packages: Install the package
and read the Installation and doc files in the work dir, where the
sources reside.

>2.  Does one edit each config file or is there a config utility
>    program to manipulate the file?

You have to configure each config file. This is an advantage:
It's all in ascii, every config file is for a special purpose,
you don't have one huge file, that possibly might get scrumbled
by installation programs (like in win31 .. win.ini ...)

>3.  For 2 or more example installation complexity levels, what are the
>    key elements to understand about the each type of config file
>    on the system?  Give at least a beginner, and an intermediate example.

The key element is:
        a) RTFM before doing anything
        b) every config file has a certain syntax and Unix is often
           very picky, if you violate the fix structury (fstab, passwd)

>4.  What are the differences between X-windows and MS-windows?  Like how
>    do ya start the darned thing?  (I had to get an e-mail reply
>    to tell me that you do a startx command to get going!)  

I think this is described in the manpage for X. Generally:
Copy the sample xinit file (/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/xinit/xinitrc (if I
remember right) to $HOME/.xinitrc

Edit it later, to use your favourity window manager at startup and
some clients of your choice.

Type 'xini', this will start X11.

>    Exclude the
>    obvious user interface operational differences and concentrate on the
>    setup of the environment and the configuration of a couple of X-
>    applications such as Netscape 2.02 for BSD.  Test your example
>    setup steps.  What steps can be made to bridge any deficiencies
>    that X-windows might not have over MS-windows like file type
>    associations, OLE2, TTFonts, DDE, NetDDE, filesharing, icon
>    files in a program manager or file manager user interface
>    shell program--I dunno, I'm no expert--other stuff?

X11 is X11, there are different window managers, that have all special
features: other colors, other buttons, other functionality, ...
You are free, to use the one you like the best ....

The window manager, that comes with stock X11 is the twm. So, please
read the manpage of twm(1) and you'll get enough information ...

If you prefer fvwm, like many do, go into the ports collection, install
fvwm, read the doco how to fine tune it ...
And simply replace the windowmanager twm with fvwm in your .xinitrc file.

>5.  What are the major configuration choices that have to be made?  What
>    impact will these decisions have on operation of the system at a
>    later stage (as the disk gets full or other)?

Difficult to say, depends on what you want to make with the system.
If I were you, I would choose sane defaults at the beginning, and if
you are more familiar with Unix, I would recommend to reinstall if
necessary. Dependencies:
        - do you want to run a news server ?
        - do you want to have a caching and proxy server
        - how many online user
        - how big is your amount of RAM and how large are your
          programs (swap space=
        - Do you want to have the ports collection in /usr
          so reserve enough space for /usr/local and the
          unpacked sources of the largest package you want to compile ...

And so on ... you cannot learn all of it within an hour.

>I found that I have re-installed the software 5 times now.  Each time I
>do it, I correct for a bad answer that I gave the first several times.
>This might be OK if I had a Pentium Pro 200 MHz with 512 Mbytes Ram and
>a 12x speed CD-Rom, but I don't and the process each time takes a couple
>of hours to do.  The first couple of times no harm was done to the
>configuration, but the latter few times cause a bunch of the customized
>configuration files and user setups to be stepped-on and overwritten with
>the default crap.

Well, the first steps are hard in every OS !

>I chose the defaults for the file partitioning/disk labeling process, but it
>turned out that the "Everything install" that I did ran out of /var or /tmp
>or / root disk file blocks and got a disk full error in the middle of
>unpacking distribution apps.  I examined which of the items ran out, then
>I multiplied the default by 10 to get a bit of head room for the
>next install attempt.  30 Mbytes turned into 300 Mbytes.  The frigging thing
>ought to install its 700 Mbytes into a 2.1 Gig drive that has a 440 Mbyte
>Dos partition already setup?

You gain experiences more and more ... after the 10th installation
you'll be more clever than after the 1st time ;-) Take it with
humor.

>The sysinstall program is amazing!  But maybe it does too much all at once
>for configuring the system.  Perhaps it should be segmented into a
>couple of standard components that call "plug and play"-type scripts
>from the application being installed so that each item can not only
>be copied to the disk, but configured and maybe test launched
>(after some context info is saved to disk if re-booting is required).

I'd refuse in this. Unix boxes work in so many different environment,
I think nothing can be managed as 'plug & play'.

The way sysinstall works now, is quite ok and better then nothing.
It doen't do too much to the system, that's ok, the rest of the
task is up to the User/Administrator.

>Microsoft has steadily improved its installation mechanisms so that
>applications are easy to install.  INI files and system registration
>database file(s) are in the Windows directory and aren't scattered
>all over the place.  

Forget that crap ... How many times did I have to reinstall windows,
only because a crap software hosed win,ini or now ... the registry
which isn't in the system in ASCII readable form ....

And I don't think it's funny, that every program package put's his
DLL files into one common directory. It's really bullshit.

>Paths to application executables are frequently
>not required because the application group/icon/short-cut files
>contain the setup context required for each application to be
>launched correctly.  Now, re-booting/re-starting MS-windows is less
>required than it used to be.  Settings are re-read and
>refresh the existing run-time session.  When certain disk drive
>mappings change, short-cut files have the changes propagated to them.

Well, I think then Win95 is the OS of your choice ;-))

>Some positive things about FreeBSD:

aaahh ;-))

>1. When somebody buys the CDs, they seem to get a good lot of
>   stuff to start out with and for very nearly zero cost!

jep.

        Andreas ///

--
andr...@klemm.gtn.com         /\/\___      Wiechers & Partner Datentechnik GmbH
   Andreas Klemm          ___/\/\/         Support Unix -- andreas.kl...@wup.de
pgp p-key  http://www-swiss.ai.mit.edu/~bal/pks-toplev.html  >>> powered by <<<
ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/system/Printing/aps-491.tgz  >>>    FreeBSD <<<

 
 
 

FreeBSD 2.1 Documentation and Installation of "Everything" to 2.1 Gig drive.

Post by Chris K. Skinn » Fri, 31 May 1996 04:00:00


Hi.  Latest update:  Samba permits partial then, later,
full browse and functionality.

>cc of this news msg was given to

>anecdotal purposes and for further questions below...

With samba files left as last reported in my previous
news article, and a bit more tinkering with DNS
config files for the reverse .IN-ADDR.ARPA stuff
seems to, eventually, have all of samba operational now.

I was proceeding to try to get nslookup to not have that
the default server was unix.bml.ca (our LAN stuff) with
an address of 0.0.0.0. on the nslookup startup.

Step 1 was to tinker with the "named" setup config files.
Step 2 was to kill the existing "named" process and re-
start a new one to test the changes.

Within step 2, I found that the named-re-start produced
the following diagnostic messages that WERE _NOT_
previously visible on the console when
"named" was started automatically at boot time:

unix.bml.ca named[262] starting named ....
LOCAL-951116.090057 Thu Nov 16 09:00:57 1995

named[262] ... ZONE "0.0.127.IN-ADDR.ARPA"
(file localhost.rev) has no NS RRs found at ZONE top.

named[262] ... ZONE "0.0.10.IN-ADDR.ARPA"
(file named.rev) has no NS RRs found at ZONE top.

(or messages of very similar wordings).

When "named" started, it complained that the reverse lookup
tables did not have a Name Server Resource Record for the
top of the given zone for both of the two .IN-ADDR.ARPA
references that I had given in the /etc/namedb/named.boot
config file.  

My problem was that I had a dummy host as the top of the
zone/origins of both of the files, and at a reverse
lookup offset of 1.0, I put my unix box as the name server.  

To correct this, I changed the origin to be the unix box
"unix.bml.ca." instead of the dummy "bml.ca" and changed
all the IP address relative offsets by -1 from their
previous values--ie., start at 0.0, then 1.0, then 2.0,
then 3.0 and up.

I still get that the default server is unix.bml.ca with
address 0.0.0.0, but samba nmbd seems to announce the
machine shares to other machines who are running
tcp/ip. Host name "UNIX" with comment "Samba 1.9.14"
appears on the Dos/WFWG 3.11 connect network drive
browse dialog.

The first time when I click on this list box entry for
host "UNIX" the Dos/Windows computer went into hour
glass mode for 30 seconds or so, then reported that
"Network Busy" as the result, and listed no share names
in the shared directory list box at the bottom of the
dialog.

Further tinkering with the "named" _forward_ lookup config
tables and the root servers config file seems to have
overcome this last hurdle:  now clicking on the
host "UNIX" gives immediate response of the available
share names!

Getting named's config files in better shape, fixed
samba's final troubled areas.  

The prior samba config process that I undertook that
followed closely the teaching of the man pages for all of
smbd and nmbd and the inetd.conf config files turned
out all to be required and good.  That samba config'ing
overcame any botch-ups of my own making and that of the
install software from my various runnings of the
sysinstall process from boot floppy or hard disk.

Finally, one 'problem' remaining is that of the nslookup
still giving that the default NS of unix.bml.ca displaying
an address of 0.0.0.0

Can anybody able to tell me if the nslookup of FreeBSD 2.1.0
Jan'96 is supposed to have 0.0.0.0 as a viable displayed
default NS address, when the NS's address is really
10.0.0.1?  

The good 10.0.0.1 address is reported by nslookup when
"nslookup unix.bml.ca" is executed--so I still don't
know if this is right or not...

Things that I am considering doing:  try the automated
hosts to named config perl script that produces both forward
and reversed lookup config files for named.  The www site
"DNS Tools" at http://www.dns.net/dnsrd/tools.html has
this h2n script:

* h2n to generate forward and reverse zone files
  from /etc/hosts; described in the cricket book.

ftp://ftp.uu.net/published/oreilly/nutshell/dnsbind/dns.tar.Z
ftp://ftp.is.co.za/networking/ip/dns/cricketbook/dns.tar.Z

dnswalk and makezones are other programs that I'm considering
trying out that are from the same www page source.

Quote:>Possible bug considerations:  

Why didn't the named startup at boot time not display the
helpful/meaningful diagnostic messages that happened
when manual startup was done?--or if logged elsewhere,
then perhaps they should be elevated in priority and
be displayed/logged similar to other console error/warning
messages?

TIA.  Regards, Chris K. Skinner.

 
 
 

1. Why does FreeBSD 2.1 + IBM ValuePoint = "Dead" keyboard?

I installed FreeBSD 2.1 from InfoMagic cd-rom on an IBM ValuePoint
486DX66 with 16MB.  After booting from hard drive, system will not
accept anything from the keyboard (yes - not anything).  If I telnet
into the machine from another host, everything appears normal.  The
only input devices are the keyboard and a ps/2 type mouse (not
supported by the kernel yet).  I've looked in the CMOS but there's
nothing to change there about the keyboard and FreeBSD doesn't
seem to provide any options either.  I've also tried it on a sister
IBM VP with the same result.  Any ideas?  Thanks!

Jim

Burlington Industries, Inc.
Greensboro, NC 27410

2. precompiled binary for SCREEN ?

3. Live Upgrde 2.1 and Veritas "awareness", and can swap be used of boot build?

4. Socket Connection > 10

5. Can NOT change "limit" value under AS 2.1

6. Setting up Faxserver

7. can't "make world" on 2.1-stable (PL 112)

8. Supporting both RH6.x and RH7.x

9. Solaris 2.1 loadable "modules"

10. Problem with "system()" function on AIX4.2.1

11. Realtime "Fast"Scheduling in Solaris2.0/2.1

12. KDM on Kde2.2.1 without "go to console" :-(

13. I did "rpm -u ld.so" in RedHat 2.1 :-(