PnP network cards?

PnP network cards?

Post by One Kosher Pick » Tue, 23 Jul 1996 04:00:00



I have a NE2000 compatible network card.  Sounds good so far, but it's
Plug and Play (ugh).  It has absolutely NO dip switches.  I don't even
know what exact IRQ it is because of this.  I get timeout messages when
booting FreeBSD, and I'm stuck..  It is configured for the correct port
address...but I'm not so sure about the IRQ.  Can somebody tell me how to
find the IRQ out, without having to believe Windows 95?  Thanks for any
ideas..

 
 
 

PnP network cards?

Post by Ken Bigelo » Thu, 25 Jul 1996 04:00:00



> I have a NE2000 compatible network card.  Sounds good so far, but it's
> Plug and Play (ugh).  It has absolutely NO dip switches.  I don't even
> know what exact IRQ it is because of this.  I get timeout messages when
> booting FreeBSD, and I'm stuck..  It is configured for the correct port
> address...but I'm not so sure about the IRQ.  Can somebody tell me how to
> find the IRQ out, without having to believe Windows 95?  Thanks for any
> ideas..

I think you're going to have to disable plug'n'play completely, and then
use software to explicitly set what you want. Otherwise it can
self-switch on you, which FBSD won't like.
--

Ken

Are you interested in   |
byte-sized education    |   http://www.play-hookey.com
over the Internet?      |

 
 
 

PnP network cards?

Post by t.. » Sat, 27 Jul 1996 04:00:00



Quote:>I have a NE2000 compatible network card.  Sounds good so far, but it's
>Plug and Play (ugh).  It has absolutely NO dip switches.  I don't even
>know what exact IRQ it is because of this.  I get timeout messages when

If it is true PnP your screwed. ;-)  I'm assuming that it is a NE2000 _ISA_
clone.

The ISA bus was never designed for Plug and Pray.  What goes on with
Plug and Pray ISA cards (Like the popular SoundBlapper AWE32 PnP) is that
they tie all the IRQ's to the card, then the operating system is supposed to
sort out which IRQ goes to what and tell the card through some magic
incantation what IRQ it is supposed to use, the card then disables all the
other IRQ's.

This works OK when you have ONE ISA card in there, but when you have
multiple ones then you can get a mess, with no one knowing what IRQ is
supposed to go to who.

Sometimes (like with the SoundBlapper) they have a DOS utility that loads,
reads a file with the appropriate settings, and then programs the card and
then terminates.  This goes into Autoexec under DOS.

A lot of times network cards with no jumpers use a configuration program
that actually programs the appropriate IRQ into there.  Some of them also
can turn off the PnP feature and program the IRQ.  If your card is like this
you just need to obtain the utility.

Since PnP circuitry is expensive, if you have a nameless clone NE2000 made
in an asian country, I'd hazard a guess it is really not PnP, and needs a
configuration utility to set the jumpers.

Keep in mind that there are now lots of ISA cards which are labeled PnP but
what their referring to is that the device driver for the card (at least the
supplied ones, anyway) will auto configure themselves to whatever the card
is set to without telling the driver through configuration or whatever where
the card is at.  I guess you could say this is lying.

Also, PCI cards are generally PnP, as there is actually a negotiation
mechanism on the PCI buss for determining where the card is at.  Also, a
sometimes you can override this (like in the Buslogic PCI cards) and tell the
PCI card where to configure itself.

My guess is your card is configured with a software program that saves the
jumper settings to the card's NVRAM.  If it isin't, you could try experimenting.
Most PnP cards have a default set of ports and interrupts that they use
everytime the card is turned on, if yours is like this and you can figure out
where it is set to you can simply rebuild the kernel.  (hopefully it doesen't
stomp on a useful interrupt like IRQ3)

Ted

 
 
 

PnP network cards?

Post by Amancio Hasty Jr » Sat, 27 Jul 1996 04:00:00


Try mailing to Sujal Patel and ask him for his PnP support for

Generally speaking you are better off asking this sort of questions

--
Amancio Hasty                      
Hasty Software Consulting Services
Tel:      415-495-3046
Fax:      415-495-3046
Cellular: 415-309-8434

 
 
 

PnP network cards?

Post by Sujal Pat » Sat, 27 Jul 1996 04:00:00


Beta quality support for Plug-n-Play devices is available on:

ftp://freefall.freebsd.org/incoming/FreeBSD-ISA_PnP_June8.tar.gz

It should allow you to use your network card.

Sujal

 
 
 

PnP network cards?

Post by Terry Lamber » Thu, 01 Aug 1996 04:00:00


]

Quote:Pickle) writes:

] >I have a NE2000 compatible network card.  Sounds good so far,
] >but it's Plug and Play (ugh).  It has absolutely NO dip switches.
] >I don't even know what exact IRQ it is because of this.  I get
] >timeout messages when
]
] If it is true PnP your screwed. ;-)  I'm assuming that it is a
] NE2000 _ISA_ clone.
]
] The ISA bus was never designed for Plug and Pray.  What goes on
] with Plug and Pray ISA cards (Like the popular SoundBlapper
] AWE32 PnP) is that they tie all the IRQ's to the card, then
] the operating system is supposed to sort out which IRQ goes to
] what and tell the card through some magic incantation what IRQ
] it is supposed to use, the card then disables all the other
] IRQ's.

Actually, a "real PnP card" starts out disabled.

The PnP BIOS then uses an abbreviated bsearch to enable the cards
one at a time, and inb their possible configurations.

Then the PnP BIOS tries to assign non-conflicting resources to
each card.  For each card it can do this for, it reenables the
card (for instance, if you had 3 wierdonet cards, and they could
only use IRQ 2 or IRQ 5, only 2 of them would be enabled).

When you use a PnP card in a non-PnP BIOS machine, the card stays
disabled because it can't tell about conflicts with onboard
hardware (serial ports, PCNet ethernet, IDE controllers, PS/2
mouse on IRQ 12, etc.).

In general, most PnP cards have a non-PnP switch setting and you
can force their setup using a configuration disk to adjust the
soft switches.

So PnP works, it just doesn't work without PnP BIOS.

Then you need your OS to be "PnP aware" so it can go out an ask
the cards where they landed, and save the information for use
by the OS's drivers.

There is beta PnP support for FreeBSD itself, written by
Sujal Patel.  You should get on the -hackers list if you want
to work with any beta code.

Note that if your motherboard doesn't have a PnP BIOS, you
are pretty much screwed when it comes to using PnP cards.  There
tends to be hadware slot switching support required of the
motherboard or the full disable and card search phases.  The
FreeBSD probe order is set up so that each possible bus is
polled from least configurable to most configurable, but if
you don't have a PnP BIOS and motherboard, there's no way to
identify conflicts with on-board controllers on the motherboard
itself.

Search for "Plug-n-play" on Yahoo and read the spec on the
Microsoft and Intel sites for more information.

                                        Terry Lambert

---
Any opinions in this posting are my own and not those of my present
or previous employers.

 
 
 

1. SMC 8416 PnP Network card

I have managed to install mandrake 7.0 but I
have not being able to get this ethernet card to
work. It is a Plug and Play which now recognize
by the "isapnp" but the card still does not work.
I also tried Lothar "etherconfig" and I notice
that this card is not in the List.
Questions
1.- Is my card supported ( I look at the supported
  hardware and It said it is )
2.- What else can I do to get this card to work

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

2. Copying the BOOT/MILO/RD floppies

3. About how to configure an ISA PNP network card

4. Help with NFS server on AIX 4.3.2

5. NE2000 compatible, pnp network card problems

6. Booting from floppy to Kernel on Fixed disk

7. Problem with PnP network card

8. Installation Question

9. New AT-1500 (PNP) Network cards

10. setting up a secondary PnP Network card

11. PnP network cards

12. 3.0 and PnP Network Cards

13. pnp network card question - SMC1660