Newbie question

Newbie question

Post by Josh Berr » Thu, 03 Jan 2002 18:38:14



I'm not a complete newbie to FreeBSD, but I always had the convenience of
installing onto a computer that had a permanent connection to the internet
with a fixed IP address and domain name.

However, the other day, I decided that I was ready to throw FreeBSD onto my
laptop.  Currently, at home, I have my main machine running Win2000 which
connects through a DSL account to the internet.  (This may change to a
router, but I don't think that will affect the rest of my question)

So...  I hooked up my laptop through the Win2k box.  However, since I didn't
have the latest CD's for FreeBSD, I wanted to install over FTP.  Choosing the
appropriate option, I then selected DHCP for configuring the box.  All of this
worked fine, except where it wants a hostname and domain.  I don't really have
a valid one.  

In the past, I've simply made up names.   So I decided to do that this time,
and it seemed to work.  In fact, most everything that I do does work.  However,
I have had a few problems (biggest one being that CVSup doesn't work) and I
can not help but feel that I cheated on the name selection.

So... to sum up my problem.   What are the rules for selecting a hostname and
domain when you are going to be working on an internal network that has to
NAT to get to the internet?  (At least, I think that is the correct way to
say what I am doing. :)

-josh

P.S.  Sorry for such a verbose posting.   And I also want to apologize if this
      has been answered to death elsewhere.  I gave it a good searching for,
      but did not find anything that seemed to deal with my problem, perhaps
      I just didn't know where to look.  If so, please point me to the right
      place.

--
Josh  Berry              | "Get busy living,
                         |  Or get busy dying."

 
 
 

Newbie question

Post by tantamoun » Fri, 04 Jan 2002 20:06:41


Quote:> So...  I hooked up my laptop through the Win2k box.  However, since I
didn't
> have the latest CD's for FreeBSD, I wanted to install over FTP.  Choosing
the
> appropriate option, I then selected DHCP for configuring the box.  All of
this
> worked fine, except where it wants a hostname and domain.  I don't really
have
> a valid one.

If the IP address is a private one then feel somewhat free to make up a
name.  If the IP address is a public one then you'll have to find out what
hostname belongs to it.  This is of course if w2k is acting as a gateway and
not a forwarder in the scheme of things.

Quote:> In the past, I've simply made up names.   So I decided to do that this
time,
> and it seemed to work.  In fact, most everything that I do does work.
However,
> I have had a few problems (biggest one being that CVSup doesn't work) and
I
> can not help but feel that I cheated on the name selection.

what is cvsup doing? Is it connecting and going along or is it doing
something off the wall like not working at all?  you might want to get and
fetch the latest release of cvsup (1e, from what I recall) and do a pkg_add
and see how that works for you.

Quote:> So... to sum up my problem.   What are the rules for selecting a hostname
and
> domain when you are going to be working on an internal network that has to
> NAT to get to the internet?  (At least, I think that is the correct way to
> say what I am doing. :)

As mentioned previously if your IP address is public, eg you got a range of
IP address from your DSL provider then in general you should also be given a
hostname along with them.  You can probably find out the other names by
checking out the w2k system and see what your provider assinged to you as a
host/domain name.  If you only have one IP address given to you by the
provider and you are using private IP addresses for your internal network
then your host/domain name is what ever you wish it to be as long as you, in
general use the same domain name and just change the host name portion.
Also, if you are running internal DHCP then  it may not be delving out
hostnames properly.  Dunno how that works or I would provide a solution.
Guess I'll have to fiddle with it on another machine.

For example, I have FreeBSD as my gateway to cable modem. It has provider's
hostname assigned to it.  Then along with that I have another NIC that is on
a private IP address (192.)  My WinNT system has it's own host/domain name
and a NIC on the private address and I have another windows 98 machine that
is also on the private address with different hostname but same domain as NT
machine.  And to make sure that all is well, I am having NT handle all DNS
for my itty bitty network, even the FreeBSD machine looks to WinNT for DNS.
WinNT DNS has local names and if it can't find it in it's records I told it
to go to my provider's DNS and do a resolution.

Everybody is all fat dumb and happy.  Well with the exception of sendmail, I
had to tell it to allow internal machines to do relaying.  But that's
another adventure.

Also, if you get a router, it may have DHCP as an option. In any case you
might want to find something on DHCP.  Being sure to check appropriate
sources.  Microsoft or FreeBSD.  And in there you should be able to find a
solution to your problem. :)

Don't worry mate.  Better to be verbose then not.

> -josh

> P.S.  Sorry for such a verbose posting.   And I also want to apologize if
this
>       has been answered to death elsewhere.  I gave it a good searching
for,
>       but did not find anything that seemed to deal with my problem,
perhaps
>       I just didn't know where to look.  If so, please point me to the
right
>       place.

> --
> Josh  Berry              | "Get busy living,
>                          |  Or get busy dying."



 
 
 

Newbie question

Post by Josh Berr » Sat, 05 Jan 2002 23:02:15


: what is cvsup doing? Is it connecting and going along or is it doing
: something off the wall like not working at all?  you might want to get and
: fetch the latest release of cvsup (1e, from what I recall) and do a pkg_add
: and see how that works for you.

It was going off the wall and not working at all.  Specifically, it would
say something along the lines of "Could not find local IP address, does the
machine have a valid hostname?"

The error is what prompted me to question whether or not you could just make
up a name.  However, I then looked in my hosts file and saw that the default
name for localhost was myname.mydomain.com, so... I changed that (and a couple
of other references, in the same file) to reflect the name I had made up. Now
CVSup works fine.

Is there anywhere else I should update the system with my own name for the
network?  I had sort of figured the installation would have taken care of
most of that for me, but evidently not.  :)  Good time to learn, I guess.

: Also, if you get a router, it may have DHCP as an option. In any case you
: might want to find something on DHCP.  Being sure to check appropriate
: sources.  Microsoft or FreeBSD.  And in there you should be able to find a
: solution to your problem. :)

That leads me to another question, actually. :)  I'll post it top level in
a day.  I don't have time to post right now.

: Don't worry mate.  Better to be verbose then not.

Thanks for the help.  I've only used this newsgroup a few times, but I can't
help but be impressed by how curteous most people are here.  I'm used to the
rude people who treat you as if your an idiot if you ask a question.  :/

-josh

--
Josh  Berry              | "Get busy living,
                         |  Or get busy dying."

 
 
 

Newbie question

Post by ../ » Mon, 07 Jan 2002 21:16:36




> : what is cvsup doing? Is it connecting and going along or is it doing
> : something off the wall like not working at all?  you might want to get
and
> : fetch the latest release of cvsup (1e, from what I recall) and do a
pkg_add
> : and see how that works for you.

> It was going off the wall and not working at all.  Specifically, it would
> say something along the lines of "Could not find local IP address, does
the
> machine have a valid hostname?"

> The error is what prompted me to question whether or not you could just
make
> up a name.  However, I then looked in my hosts file and saw that the
default
> name for localhost was myname.mydomain.com, so... I changed that (and a
couple
> of other references, in the same file) to reflect the name I had made up.
Now
> CVSup works fine.

> Is there anywhere else I should update the system with my own name for the
> network?  I had sort of figured the installation would have taken care of
> most of that for me, but evidently not.  :)  Good time to learn, I guess.

> : Also, if you get a router, it may have DHCP as an option. In any case
you
> : might want to find something on DHCP.  Being sure to check appropriate
> : sources.  Microsoft or FreeBSD.  And in there you should be able to find
a
> : solution to your problem. :)

> That leads me to another question, actually. :)  I'll post it top level in
> a day.  I don't have time to post right now.

> : Don't worry mate.  Better to be verbose then not.

> Thanks for the help.  I've only used this newsgroup a few times, but I
can't
> help but be impressed by how curteous most people are here.  I'm used to
the
> rude people who treat you as if your an idiot if you ask a question.  :/

> -josh

> --
> Josh  Berry              | "Get busy living,
>                          |  Or get busy dying."


Well, if you're not running an 'internal' DNS, all you have to modify is
/etc/hosts and perhaps add a line to /etc/rc.conf like so:

hostname="blah.blah.com" or "blah.blah.internal", doesn't really matter.

I run both internal and external DNS, my internal top level domain I simply
called .internal, so my internal (at home this is) hosts are like:
majesty.internal, devnull.internal, etc.. instead of .com. Being internal,
doesn't really matter if you even call it myhost.mydomain.gov.

If you need reference to what you can add to rc.conf, reference the
/etc/defaults/rc.conf but make any changes you want from there to
/etc/rc.conf, and not /etc/defaults/rc.conf. This would be similar to the
LINT file.

Hope that helps!

Regards!

 
 
 

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