How to make bootable CD-ROM?

How to make bootable CD-ROM?

Post by 1ùó? » Fri, 24 Oct 1997 04:00:00




> How can I make a bootable CD-ROM with FreeBSD 2.2.5 on it?

Get latest mkisofs, you can then make a EI-Torito bootable ISO9660 CD
image.
Then burn it to your CDR.
cdwriter can help.
 
 
 

How to make bootable CD-ROM?

Post by Zlatko Calusi » Fri, 24 Oct 1997 04:00:00



> How can I make a bootable CD-ROM with FreeBSD 2.2.5 on it?

I'm also looking forward for suggestions about this topic.

I would like to FTP everything that's needed to make CD with FreeBSD.
Since I never used FreeBSD before (only Linux), I'm little confused
with different directories and distributions on ftp.FreeBSD.org.

Not to say that there's more than 650MB of things there. :)

Can somebody list the directories which should be on FreeBSD 2.2.5
install CD?

It would be nice that CD is bootable, but that's not mandatory.

TIA
--

---------------------------------------------------------------------
               I'm Not Schizophrenic, And Neither Am I.

 
 
 

How to make bootable CD-ROM?

Post by J Wuns » Fri, 24 Oct 1997 04:00:00



> How can I make a bootable CD-ROM with FreeBSD 2.2.5 on it?

The installation CD, or a generic bootable filesystem CD?

For the installation CD, it's not too difficult.  This kind of CDs is
probably the only one where what the El Torito specs call ``emulation
booting'' makes a little sense at all.  Just run mkisofs (version 1.10
or higher) with `floppies/boot.flp' as the argument for the boot
image, and it will take care for the rest.  You also need to specify a
file where it can store the `boot catalog'.  That's nothing you need
to worry much about, you can specify an arbitrary filename.  Take care
to use a filename that's not in use by anything else, or it will be
overwritten.  A common name is `boot.cat'; the name is (like the name
of the boot image) relative to the root of the CD-ROM filesystem.

For a generic bootable CD, it's quite more difficult.  There is some
code called `cdboot' in -current that allows you to create a bootstrap
for booting off an ISO 9660 CD, that is, boot /kernel, and mount the
CD as the root filesystem.  Due to the crappy specs this `El Torito'
stuff actually is, that sounds easier than it turned out to be.  Also,
be forwarned that this does only work on a minor number of controllers
and BIOS revisions; the only one i've got it to work was the AHA29xx
series from Adaptec, with their BIOS revision 1.23.  Later BIOS
revisions have broken basic CD-ROM IO support again, and other vendors
(like all the ``bootable ATAPI'' BIOSes i've seen so far) don't even
implement the required BIOS extensions to read a CD at all.  Even
Adaptec implements only half of the El Torito stuff, the (more
preferrable) non-emulation booting wasn't implemented at least in rev
1.23.  They promised me that it's been implemented later, but see
above: i haven't got rev 1.25 to support the BIOS Int 0x13 extensions
at all, despite of the menu item in the ^A menu.  Thus, cdboot still
uses the `emulation booting', where the emulated floppy image contains
just and only the bootstrap itself (7.5 KB, padded to 1.44 MB).

--
cheers, J"org


Never trust an operating system you don't have sources for. ;-)

 
 
 

How to make bootable CD-ROM?

Post by Andre Opperman » Fri, 24 Oct 1997 04:00:00


How can I make a bootable CD-ROM with FreeBSD 2.2.5 on it?

--
Andre Oppermann

CEO / Geschaeftsfuehrer
Internet Business Solutions Ltd. (AG)
Hardstrasse 235, 8005 Zurich, Switzerland
Fon +41 1 277 75 75 / Fax +41 1 277 75 77

 
 
 

How to make bootable CD-ROM?

Post by Andre Opperman » Sat, 25 Oct 1997 04:00:00




> > How can I make a bootable CD-ROM with FreeBSD 2.2.5 on it?

> The installation CD, or a generic bootable filesystem CD?

The installation CD, I don't have time to wait until the 'official'
Walnut Creek CDROM ships (and it takes even longer to Europe).

Quote:> For the installation CD, it's not too difficult.  This kind of CDs is
> probably the only one where what the El Torito specs call ``emulation
> booting'' makes a little sense at all.  Just run mkisofs (version 1.10
> or higher) with `floppies/boot.flp' as the argument for the boot
> image, and it will take care for the rest.  You also need to specify a
> file where it can store the `boot catalog'.  That's nothing you need
> to worry much about, you can specify an arbitrary filename.  Take care
> to use a filename that's not in use by anything else, or it will be
> overwritten.  A common name is `boot.cat'; the name is (like the name
> of the boot image) relative to the root of the CD-ROM filesystem.

Is it also possible to do this on a Windoze machine (in general, when
the CD-toast SW has support for bootable CDROM (I don't have a FreeBSD
with a cd-rec.))?

-snip- (a lot of good text, sorry)

Thanks
--
Andre Oppermann

CEO / Geschaeftsfuehrer
Internet Business Solutions Ltd. (AG)
Hardstrasse 235, 8005 Zurich, Switzerland
Fon +41 1 277 75 75 / Fax +41 1 277 75 77

 
 
 

How to make bootable CD-ROM?

Post by J Wuns » Sat, 25 Oct 1997 04:00:00



> > The installation CD, or a generic bootable filesystem CD?

> The installation CD, I don't have time to wait until the 'official'
> Walnut Creek CDROM ships (and it takes even longer to Europe).

Ick!

Folks, pleeeeease!  Mark your Cc's of Usenet postings as such.  I (and
i'm sure not only me) am sick of seeing posting in Usenet i've already
innocently answered in private mail.

--
cheers, J"org


Never trust an operating system you don't have sources for. ;-)

 
 
 

1. Bootable floppy different than bootable CD ROM for installation of RH 8.0?

Is using a bootable installation floppy any different than
booting installation disc 1?

I am trying to install Red Hat 8.0 on a Dell Latitude CPi laptop.
Red Hat 7.2 is already installed, but many things (e.g. suspend
to RAM or HD, K-mail, KDE Help) don't work.  I'm willing to
experiment with 8.0 to see if it's any better.

I've downloaded ISO images and burned installation discs 1, 2,
and 3.  The MD5SUM checksums on the downloaded files are correct,
and all three CDs pass the "linux mediacheck" at the boot prompt.
I've configured the BIOS to allow booting from the CD ROM.  Since
I get to the boot prompt, I'm assuming that's working correctly.
But, the installation process aborts after probing for hardware.

Here's essentially (not a cut and paste) what I get on the
screen:

Running anaconda
Probing for video - NeoMagic 128XD (laptop/notebook)
Probing for monitor - Unable to probe
Probing for mouse - Generic 3-button (PS/2)
Traceback (most recent call last)
  File "/usr/bin/anaconda", line 480, in ?
    import xserver
  File "/usr/lib/anaconda/xserver.py", line 27, in ?
    from snack import *
  File "/usb/lib/python2.2/site-packages/snack.py", line 7, in ?
    import _snack
ImportError: /usr/lib/libnewt.so.0.51: invalid ELF header
install exited abnormally
sending termination signals ... done
sending kill signals ... done
disabling swap ...
unmounting filesystems ...
  /mnt/runtime  done
  disabling /dev/loop0
  /proc/bus/usb  done
  /proc  done
  /dev/pts  done
  /mnt/source  done
you may safely reboot your system

I'm asking about a difference between using a floppy and a CD ROM
because for all of my past installations, I've created and used a
floppy, and the installation process was sometimes tiresome but
successful.  The only hardware change since the 7.2 installation
is the addition of 64 MB of RAM (bringing the total to 128 MB).
RH 7.2 worked before and after this change (noticeably faster
after).  When I used the floppy as the installation boot media, I
had the CD drive in a modular bay and the floppy drive connected
via cable.  When I used the CD ROM as the installation boot
media, I had the CD drive in the same modular bay, but no floppy
drive connected at all.

I'm making excellent backward progress.  I started with
RH 5.2.  After recompiling the kernel, suspend functions were
working.  I was dual-booting with Win NT at the time.  I decide
to eliminate the Win NT and use the entire HD for Linux.  I wiped
everything clean and started over by installing RH 7.2.  I've
never been able to get suspend functions to work under 7.2.  Now
with 8.0, I'm having difficulty even getting the system
installed.

--
A. Tsakiris

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