Port 80 and port 8080

Port 80 and port 8080

Post by Michael Hen » Tue, 06 Jun 2000 04:00:00



Howdy,

        I'm running Apache on my box as a non-root user, which means
it uses port 8080, but I'd like to be able to use port 80 (so I don't
have to specify the port in the URL). Is there a way I can do this?
For example, a small program that listens on port 80 and forwards all
connections to port 8080.

Maybe I'm asking the wrong question. Perhaps I should ask if there's
a way to allow a user-process to use port 80.

Any feedback appreciated,

        Michael

 
 
 

Port 80 and port 8080

Post by Mike Andre » Wed, 07 Jun 2000 04:00:00



: Howdy,

:       I'm running Apache on my box as a non-root user, which means
: it uses port 8080, but I'd like to be able to use port 80 (so I don't
: have to specify the port in the URL). Is there a way I can do this?
: For example, a small program that listens on port 80 and forwards all
: connections to port 8080.

You can use IPFW to forward port 80 traffic to port 8080 inbound
and reverse the process outbound. That's "trivial"[1]. Have a
gander at "man ipfw" for a start, and look at recent threads in
this group, where the question has been covered in stultifying
detail.

: Maybe I'm asking the wrong question. Perhaps I should ask if there's
: a way to allow a user-process to use port 80.

I don't know of any; perhaps someone else does.

[1]     "Trivial" to a mathematician means that he used to be
        able to do it, or that he knows someone else used to be
        able to do it.

--
Cuteness can be overcome through sufficient bastardry --Mark 'Kamikaze' Hughes

 
 
 

Port 80 and port 8080

Post by Kristian Ra » Wed, 07 Jun 2000 04:00:00


Hi


>            I'm running Apache on my box as a non-root user, which means
>it uses port 8080, but I'd like to be able to use port 80 (so I don't
>have to specify the port in the URL). Is there a way I can do this?
>For example, a small program that listens on port 80 and forwards all
>connections to port 8080.

Hrmmm
One would assume that 80 aint in use ?
Sorry if the following  appears to u as a set of stupid solutions..

1) Simple

Why dont u just arrange w. root to be allowed to use the

2) Still simple

As 1 but  w. local user support
(www.wherever.whatever/~michael
according to dist. ex. u could
then "publish" in /usr/home/michael/public_html

3) Nahh i need to be server admin

Set up the httpd on 80 and have a html doc
that kinda goes
"our users personal webservers"
and a bunch a links like

="www.where.what:8000", " Michael">
="www.where.what:8001", " John">
="www.where.what:8002", "Jim">

offcourse (3) will cost an extra click, but u will
be "in charge" of u'r httpd.

regards

Kristian        AKA     The eternal Newbie

 
 
 

Port 80 and port 8080

Post by st.. » Wed, 07 Jun 2000 04:00:00




>: Howdy,

>:           I'm running Apache on my box as a non-root user, which means
>: it uses port 8080, but I'd like to be able to use port 80 (so I don't
>: have to specify the port in the URL). Is there a way I can do this?
>: For example, a small program that listens on port 80 and forwards all
>: connections to port 8080.

>You can use IPFW to forward port 80 traffic to port 8080 inbound
>and reverse the process outbound. That's "trivial"[1]. Have a
>gander at "man ipfw" for a start, and look at recent threads in
>this group, where the question has been covered in stultifying
>detail.

>: Maybe I'm asking the wrong question. Perhaps I should ask if there's
>: a way to allow a user-process to use port 80.

>I don't know of any; perhaps someone else does.

If you are running apache on port 8080 because you don't have root access
then there's no way to redirect traffic either (as you'd need root access
for the redirector to bind to port 80).

If you do have root access then running apache as root is a pretty safe
thing to do, as it drops privileges once it has bound to its port.

(Though if security is THE issue there are better webservers to run than
 apache, I suspect. thttpd or publicfile, perhaps).

Cheers,
  Steve

--

"UI: uggc://jjj.fnzfcnqr.bet/" -- dave, in the Monastery