FreeBSD 4.7: "file system full" / #df -h: "/" Avail -80.6M Capacity 109% ?!

FreeBSD 4.7: "file system full" / #df -h: "/" Avail -80.6M Capacity 109% ?!

Post by Robert Huf » Wed, 25 Jun 2003 11:14:52




>>Filesystem is full - I think it's quite obvious.

> but how may such a thing occur? and how may I prevent this? I don't remember
> any extraordinary operations which may have led to this situation...

        As part of my preventative maintenance I have this in my crontab:

        (cd /usr; du | sort -n -r | head -n 25)

        If something shows up I don't recognize, or changes   position
without explanation, it gets tracked down.

                                Robert Huff

 
 
 

FreeBSD 4.7: "file system full" / #df -h: "/" Avail -80.6M Capacity 109% ?!

Post by Rob MacGrego » Wed, 25 Jun 2003 15:13:06



> ...I use the partitions suggested by sysinnstall, but with extra-huge sizes:

> / 1GB
> /tmp 2GB
> /usr 5GB
> /var 2GB

But what's the output of df?  Telling us how much you allocated doesn't
tell us how full they are...

--
   Rob MacGregor (BOFH)        Oh my God! They killed init! You bastards!
       The light at the end of the tunnel is an oncoming dragon.

        Real email address is at Hotmail.  Put _ between my names.

 
 
 

FreeBSD 4.7: "file system full" / #df -h: "/" Avail -80.6M Capacity 109% ?!

Post by Kris Kielhofn » Wed, 25 Jun 2003 21:46:00




> > But I wouldn't do it, because that %8 is available
> > only to root and the system, and it helps to keep the filesystem from
> > becoming fragmented.

>    It's not about fragmentation - it's about how if the file system
> _really_ gets 100% full, Bad Things can happen to your filesystem.
>    Think of that 8% as very cheap insurance.

>                            Robert Huff

From man tuning:

     tunefs(8) may be used to further tune a filesystem.  This command can be
     run in single-user mode without having to reformat the filesystem.  How-
     ever, this is possibly the most abused program in the system.  Many peo-
     ple attempt to increase available filesystem space by setting the min-
     free percentage to 0.  This can lead to severe filesystem fragmentation
     and we do not recommend that you do this.

--
Kris Kielhofner