FreeBSD File System 512 byte-blocks --> 1024 byte-blocks

FreeBSD File System 512 byte-blocks --> 1024 byte-blocks

Post by Hook Hu » Fri, 31 May 1996 04:00:00



I was installing FreeBSD 2.1 several times trying to get things right
and I noticed that on my last install, the df command would return file
system block sizes of 512 bytes. All of my previous installs were of
1024 byte blocks. I always used the auto feature during the
partition. Does anyone know why it changed? And is it possible to change
the block size back to 1024bytes w/o reinstalling FreeBSD? ...what
gives?

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Hook Hua

 
 
 

FreeBSD File System 512 byte-blocks --> 1024 byte-blocks

Post by James Rayna » Fri, 31 May 1996 04:00:00



Quote:>partition. Does anyone know why it changed? And is it possible to change
>the block size back to 1024bytes w/o reinstalling FreeBSD? ...what
>gives?

Fortunately you don't need to re-install FreeBSD - this is just the
way df displays its output by default. If it annoys you, just put

alias df        df -k

in your .cshrc file - this is probably how you had it set up before.

--
James Raynard, Edinburgh, Scotland



 
 
 

FreeBSD File System 512 byte-blocks --> 1024 byte-blocks

Post by Sean T. Lamo » Fri, 31 May 1996 04:00:00



Quote:>I was installing FreeBSD 2.1 several times trying to get things right
>and I noticed that on my last install, the df command would return file
>system block sizes of 512 bytes. All of my previous installs were of

if it bothers you , do (from csh)

setenv BLOCKSIZE 1024

--
Sean T. Lamont, President / CEO, Abstract Software (ServNet)  
- Internet access * WWW hosting * TCP/IP * UNIX * NEXTSTEP * WWW Development -

"...There's no moral, it's just a lot of stuff that happens". - H. Simpson

 
 
 

FreeBSD File System 512 byte-blocks --> 1024 byte-blocks

Post by Henrik Bylu » Sat, 01 Jun 1996 04:00:00




>>partition. Does anyone know why it changed? And is it possible to change
>>the block size back to 1024bytes w/o reinstalling FreeBSD? ...what
>>gives?

>Fortunately you don't need to re-install FreeBSD - this is just the
>way df displays its output by default. If it annoys you, just put

>alias df    df -k

>in your .cshrc file - this is probably how you had it set up before.

Better yet, set your environment variable 'BLOCKSIZE' to 'k', allowing
other programs as well to know that you want blocks displayed in 1K
chunks.

/Henrik

 
 
 

FreeBSD File System 512 byte-blocks --> 1024 byte-blocks

Post by David Malo » Sat, 01 Jun 1996 04:00:00




>>partition. Does anyone know why it changed? And is it possible to change
>>the block size back to 1024bytes w/o reinstalling FreeBSD? ...what
>>gives?
>Fortunately you don't need to re-install FreeBSD - this is just the
>way df displays its output by default. If it annoys you, just put
>alias df    df -k
>in your .cshrc file - this is probably how you had it set up before.

There is another way that affects all commands. You can do

setenv BLOCKSIZE 1024

and most all commands that give results involving blocks will
come out in 1024 byte blocks then.

        David.

 
 
 

FreeBSD File System 512 byte-blocks --> 1024 byte-blocks

Post by Andrew V. Stes » Tue, 04 Jun 1996 04:00:00


: I was installing FreeBSD 2.1 several times trying to get things right
: and I noticed that on my last install, the df command would return file
: system block sizes of 512 bytes. All of my previous installs were of
: 1024 byte blocks. I always used the auto feature during the
: partition. Does anyone know why it changed? And is it possible to change
: the block size back to 1024bytes w/o reinstalling FreeBSD? ...what
: gives?

: Any suggestions would be appreciated.

: Hook Hua

        See /etc/profile and /etc/csh.login for examples of
        using BLOCKSIZE env variable. Uncomment them if you wish.

--

        With best regards -- Andrew Stesin.

        +380 (44) 2760188       +380 (44) 2713457       +380 (44) 2713560

        "You may delegate authority, but not responsibility."
                                        Frank's Management Rule #1.