SSH and SSL license clarification

SSH and SSL license clarification

Post by r.. » Wed, 02 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Here's my situation; I have a web server located at my ISP which I host
several sites on including one site that allows users to place orders
for a particular product.

I would like to use SSH to connect and administor this server.  Can I
use the free version or does my order site require me to now purchase a
license for SSH?

Does SSL work the same way?  If I purchase a certificate from Verisign,
do I still need to purchase something like Raven to handle SSL on
Apache or is ther something freely available I can use even though I
have an order site?

Thanks

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SSH and SSL license clarification

Post by Nick Hilliar » Wed, 02 Aug 2000 04:00:00



> Here's my situation; I have a web server located at my ISP which I host
> several sites on including one site that allows users to place orders
> for a particular product.

> I would like to use SSH to connect and administor this server.  Can I
> use the free version or does my order site require me to now purchase a
> license for SSH?

> Does SSL work the same way?  If I purchase a certificate from Verisign,
> do I still need to purchase something like Raven to handle SSL on
> Apache or is ther something freely available I can use even though I
> have an order site?

The source for OpenSSH and OpenSSL (which is what FreeBSD 4.x uses) both use
non-commercially restricted licenses.

However, assuming that you're a US resident, you are not legally allowed to use
RSA in any form for commercial use without paying royalties to RSA Security.
This affects both ssh and ssl.  Fortunately, the RSA patent expires shortly (Sep
20 this year), and after that date, you can do anything you want with RSA.

Similarly with Apache, if you want to use RSA, you will need to buy Raven or
Stronghold in order to stay legal until Sep 20.  After that date, you can just
use Apache-SSL for the same ends.

IDEA is still patented in the US and will be for some time to come.

Nick

 
 
 

SSH and SSL license clarification

Post by Marti » Fri, 04 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Now about non-US residents?

Is the situation the same? Do the international patents run out in Sept?



> > Here's my situation; I have a web server located at my ISP which I host
> > several sites on including one site that allows users to place orders
> > for a particular product.

> > I would like to use SSH to connect and administor this server.  Can I
> > use the free version or does my order site require me to now purchase a
> > license for SSH?

> > Does SSL work the same way?  If I purchase a certificate from Verisign,
> > do I still need to purchase something like Raven to handle SSL on
> > Apache or is ther something freely available I can use even though I
> > have an order site?

> The source for OpenSSH and OpenSSL (which is what FreeBSD 4.x uses) both
use
> non-commercially restricted licenses.

> However, assuming that you're a US resident, you are not legally allowed
to use
> RSA in any form for commercial use without paying royalties to RSA
Security.
> This affects both ssh and ssl.  Fortunately, the RSA patent expires
shortly (Sep
> 20 this year), and after that date, you can do anything you want with RSA.

> Similarly with Apache, if you want to use RSA, you will need to buy Raven
or
> Stronghold in order to stay legal until Sep 20.  After that date, you can
just
> use Apache-SSL for the same ends.

> IDEA is still patented in the US and will be for some time to come.

> Nick

 
 
 

SSH and SSL license clarification

Post by Rich Wal » Fri, 04 Aug 2000 04:00:00


        > Now about non-US residents?  Is the situation the
        > same?  Do the international patents run out in Sept?

To the best of my knowledge, the RSA encryption method is not, and
never was, patented anywhere except in the US.

The reason for this has to do with the issue of publicizing inventions
before applying for a patent.  Most countries' patent laws (basically
everywhere except the US) forbid this -- if you've already published
your work, you can't patent it.

My understanding of why R, S, and A chose to publish their work before
filing a US patent application is that they were worried that if they
applied for a patent first, the NSA would slap a secrecy order on their
work, preventing them from publishing it or doing anything else with
it.  By publishing first, they effectively protected their ability to
get a patent -- at least in the US, if not anywhere else.


 
 
 

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Hello!

I am planning to upgrade my SPARC 10 clone to Solaris 2.4 in the next
times. I received an offer some days ago from a SUN reseller, which stated
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Thank you for any hint!

Regards,

--
--
Riccardo Sibilia                                          Tel./Fax. 01/272 43 70


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