New to FreeBSD and Hello Everyone

New to FreeBSD and Hello Everyone

Post by Totally Jayynes » Sat, 10 Nov 2001 09:59:17



Hi everyone, I hope I found the right group.  Man, there are a TON of
FreeBSD NGs....

Anyway, I am BRAND NEW to FreeBSD, trying to get a server or two up
and running for my personal use and who knows, maybe run a Quake3
server off of one of them when and if I ever get any of this figured
out.

I am from the Windows world, now a decent amount there.  At least
enough to do desktop support.  My Unix knowledge is pretty much ZERO
so I thought I would try to find some support in the NGs.  Does anyone
have some suggestions as to other NGs I could join for FreeBSD for
absolute newbies if this is the wrong group?

I am reading the newbie guides and the FreeBSD manual as I go (Haven't
gotten to far, just started it today, doing a install over the
internet on one of my servers as we speak).  Hopefully I won't be
asking to many stupid questions but I am finding that even the newbie
guides tend to lean towards you deducing or knowing some stuff
already.

Anyway, let me at least get this install going.  Nice to meet all of
you and maybe one day, I can start answering other people's questions
instead of asking them.

Just for Starters, though.......

Using the 2 disk Net Install Method.
After the disks load, I go to the Device Driver list and remove all
Drivers for components that aren't in my system.  It doesn't see my
Sound card, though.  No biggy, not like I need it... at least not yet.

Do the Standard Installation.

Set partitions on my two HDs 4.3gig, 3.4 gig.  Use all the space

/swap   = 256M (twice my ram)
/       = remaining space on the 4.3
/ftp    = 3.4 gig (2nd drive, want to set up an ftp server)

For the Distribution, I am just installing EVERYTHING, I know it will
take longer, but hopefully it will save me time in the future.

Alright, it is installing... will have more questions on post
installation :)
Totally Jayynes

 
 
 

New to FreeBSD and Hello Everyone

Post by Kirk Strause » Sat, 10 Nov 2001 11:00:01



Quote:> Using the 2 disk Net Install Method.  After the disks load, I go to the
> Device Driver list and remove all Drivers for components that aren't in my
> system.  It doesn't see my Sound card, though.  No biggy, not like I need
> it... at least not yet.

Don't worry; that's not a comprehensive set of drivers that FreeBSD
supports.  The bad news is that you *may* need to recompile the kernel of
your new system to take full advantage of all of your hardware.  However, if
you need to, it's not too difficult.  You'll get plenty of help here if you
need it.

Quote:> Set partitions on my two HDs 4.3gig, 3.4 gig.  Use all the space

> /swap      = 256M (twice my ram)
> /  = remaining space on the 4.3
> /ftp       = 3.4 gig (2nd drive, want to set up an ftp server)

Not unreasonable.  It's probably not quite how I would have set it up, but
everyone in this group will have their own idea of how that should be done.

Quote:> Alright, it is installing... will have more questions on post installation
> :)

Good luck, and welcome aboard!
--
Kirk Strauser

 
 
 

New to FreeBSD and Hello Everyone

Post by Totally Jayynes » Sat, 10 Nov 2001 12:15:05


Thanks Kirk,

Reason I picked those partitions was because that is how one of the
guys at the place I work suggested to do it... and since he will
hopefully be my primary resource on FreeBSD, I might as well do it his
way until I learn a better way.

Install is finally complete but serial mouse isn't working....
hmmmm... gonna try different com ports and such....  old computer, I
wonder if my com port is just bad....  Anyway I can test that with
Unix?  Only way I can figure to test that quickly is to start a win98
install and see if I get mouse support early on in the install.




>> Using the 2 disk Net Install Method.  After the disks load, I go to the
>> Device Driver list and remove all Drivers for components that aren't in my
>> system.  It doesn't see my Sound card, though.  No biggy, not like I need
>> it... at least not yet.

>Don't worry; that's not a comprehensive set of drivers that FreeBSD
>supports.  The bad news is that you *may* need to recompile the kernel of
>your new system to take full advantage of all of your hardware.  However, if
>you need to, it's not too difficult.  You'll get plenty of help here if you
>need it.

>> Set partitions on my two HDs 4.3gig, 3.4 gig.  Use all the space

>> /swap  = 256M (twice my ram)
>> /      = remaining space on the 4.3
>> /ftp   = 3.4 gig (2nd drive, want to set up an ftp server)

>Not unreasonable.  It's probably not quite how I would have set it up, but
>everyone in this group will have their own idea of how that should be done.

>> Alright, it is installing... will have more questions on post installation
>> :)

>Good luck, and welcome aboard!

Totally Jayynes
 
 
 

New to FreeBSD and Hello Everyone

Post by tantamoun » Sat, 10 Nov 2001 12:29:26


How about a dos boot disk with your mouse driver on it :)

> Thanks Kirk,

> Reason I picked those partitions was because that is how one of the
> guys at the place I work suggested to do it... and since he will
> hopefully be my primary resource on FreeBSD, I might as well do it his
> way until I learn a better way.

> Install is finally complete but serial mouse isn't working....
> hmmmm... gonna try different com ports and such....  old computer, I
> wonder if my com port is just bad....  Anyway I can test that with
> Unix?  Only way I can figure to test that quickly is to start a win98
> install and see if I get mouse support early on in the install.




> >> Using the 2 disk Net Install Method.  After the disks load, I go to the
> >> Device Driver list and remove all Drivers for components that aren't in
my
> >> system.  It doesn't see my Sound card, though.  No biggy, not like I
need
> >> it... at least not yet.

> >Don't worry; that's not a comprehensive set of drivers that FreeBSD
> >supports.  The bad news is that you *may* need to recompile the kernel of
> >your new system to take full advantage of all of your hardware.  However,
if
> >you need to, it's not too difficult.  You'll get plenty of help here if
you
> >need it.

> >> Set partitions on my two HDs 4.3gig, 3.4 gig.  Use all the space

> >> /swap = 256M (twice my ram)
> >> / = remaining space on the 4.3
> >> /ftp = 3.4 gig (2nd drive, want to set up an ftp server)

> >Not unreasonable.  It's probably not quite how I would have set it up,
but
> >everyone in this group will have their own idea of how that should be
done.

> >> Alright, it is installing... will have more questions on post
installation
> >> :)

> >Good luck, and welcome aboard!

> Totally Jayynes

 
 
 

New to FreeBSD and Hello Everyone

Post by Bill Vermillion - alt accou » Sat, 10 Nov 2001 22:15:48




Quote:>Hi everyone, I hope I found the right group.  Man, there are a TON of
>FreeBSD NGs....
>Anyway, I am BRAND NEW to FreeBSD, trying to get a server or two up
>and running for my personal use and who knows, maybe run a Quake3
>server off of one of them when and if I ever get any of this figured
>out.

...

Quote:>Set partitions on my two HDs 4.3gig, 3.4 gig.  Use all the space

>/swap       = 256M (twice my ram)
>/   = remaining space on the 4.3
>/ftp        = 3.4 gig (2nd drive, want to set up an ftp server)

Since you have that much space I'd probably set / to 100MB. Make
/var and set it between 100MB and 200MB, your swap as is, and put
the /usr partition for the rest on your first drive.  

If you ever have a crash, having a reasonably small sized /
partition makes recovery and if needed, and fsck on that partition,
must easier/faster.  You WILL wait a bit for fsck'ing 4.3GB.

One of comment is that if you lose a file-system, usually it's
related to only one file system, and I've found in most Unix
systems its the one that / is mounted upon.  If you have to
reinstall FreeBSD you can preserve a /usr file system on a
reinstall if it is seeable, even if you have to remake the /
partition.

Quote:>For the Distribution, I am just installing EVERYTHING, I know it will
>take longer, but hopefully it will save me time in the future.

That's pretty much normal for me.  It also makes doing everything
else much easier.

Now as to being a 'newbie' we all were at one time, and there
is a 'newbie' mailing-list.


In the body of the message put only this.

lists
end

And in a few moments you have a list of a hundred or so FreeBSD
specific groups including a newbie group.  Browse the rest of the
list and see what other specific ones you need, and have fun.

 
 
 

New to FreeBSD and Hello Everyone

Post by Jed Clea » Sun, 11 Nov 2001 02:59:32


I think if you poke around in sysinstall (/stand/sysinstall) you'll find
an option to enable mouse support for console, which includes a test.

-Jed


> Thanks Kirk,

> Reason I picked those partitions was because that is how one of the
> guys at the place I work suggested to do it... and since he will
> hopefully be my primary resource on FreeBSD, I might as well do it his
> way until I learn a better way.

> Install is finally complete but serial mouse isn't working....
> hmmmm... gonna try different com ports and such....  old computer, I
> wonder if my com port is just bad....  Anyway I can test that with
> Unix?  Only way I can figure to test that quickly is to start a win98
> install and see if I get mouse support early on in the install.




> >> Using the 2 disk Net Install Method.  After the disks load, I go to the
> >> Device Driver list and remove all Drivers for components that aren't in my
> >> system.  It doesn't see my Sound card, though.  No biggy, not like I need
> >> it... at least not yet.

> >Don't worry; that's not a comprehensive set of drivers that FreeBSD
> >supports.  The bad news is that you *may* need to recompile the kernel of
> >your new system to take full advantage of all of your hardware.  However, if
> >you need to, it's not too difficult.  You'll get plenty of help here if you
> >need it.

> >> Set partitions on my two HDs 4.3gig, 3.4 gig.  Use all the space

> >> /swap        = 256M (twice my ram)
> >> /    = remaining space on the 4.3
> >> /ftp = 3.4 gig (2nd drive, want to set up an ftp server)

> >Not unreasonable.  It's probably not quite how I would have set it up, but
> >everyone in this group will have their own idea of how that should be done.

> >> Alright, it is installing... will have more questions on post installation
> >> :)

> >Good luck, and welcome aboard!

> Totally Jayynes

 
 
 

New to FreeBSD and Hello Everyone

Post by Jason Neuman » Sun, 11 Nov 2001 04:15:01



> Hi everyone, I hope I found the right group.  Man, there are a TON of
> FreeBSD NGs....

Welcome to FreeBSD. I run a non-commercial weblog site for FreeBSD
newbies
called Chucktips Newbie Friendly. You might find some of the tips and
howtos useful in getting started.

Cheers,

Jason

------------------------------------------------
Whether your a FreeBSD newbie or just want to be
one for a day,  checkout my new website.  It has
newbie written all over it!

------------------------------------------------
   http://lantech.geekvenue.net/chucktips
      _                _    _   _          
  ___| |__  _   _  ___| | _| |_(_)_ __  ___
 / __| '_ \| | | |/ __| |/ / __| | '_ \/ __|
| (__| | | | |_| | (__|   <| |_| | |_) \__ \
 \___|_| |_|\__,_|\___|_|\_\\__|_| .__/|___/
  n e w b i e   f r i e n d l y  |_|  
------------------------------------------------
"It's what being newbie friendly is all about!"
                          - chucktips ubergeek

 
 
 

New to FreeBSD and Hello Everyone

Post by Totally Jayynes » Sun, 11 Nov 2001 09:53:25


Thanks Jed, that is exactly what I did.... played around in the
/stand/sysinstall for a bit... I think it was set to the PS/2 mouse
when it was actually a serial... so I told it to use the Microsoft
Driver and try to use port one.... ran the mouse daemon and it
worked...  thanks again for the suggestion.



>I think if you poke around in sysinstall (/stand/sysinstall) you'll find
>an option to enable mouse support for console, which includes a test.

>-Jed


>> Thanks Kirk,

>> Reason I picked those partitions was because that is how one of the
>> guys at the place I work suggested to do it... and since he will
>> hopefully be my primary resource on FreeBSD, I might as well do it his
>> way until I learn a better way.

>> Install is finally complete but serial mouse isn't working....
>> hmmmm... gonna try different com ports and such....  old computer, I
>> wonder if my com port is just bad....  Anyway I can test that with
>> Unix?  Only way I can figure to test that quickly is to start a win98
>> install and see if I get mouse support early on in the install.




>> >> Using the 2 disk Net Install Method.  After the disks load, I go to the
>> >> Device Driver list and remove all Drivers for components that aren't in my
>> >> system.  It doesn't see my Sound card, though.  No biggy, not like I need
>> >> it... at least not yet.

>> >Don't worry; that's not a comprehensive set of drivers that FreeBSD
>> >supports.  The bad news is that you *may* need to recompile the kernel of
>> >your new system to take full advantage of all of your hardware.  However, if
>> >you need to, it's not too difficult.  You'll get plenty of help here if you
>> >need it.

>> >> Set partitions on my two HDs 4.3gig, 3.4 gig.  Use all the space

>> >> /swap        = 256M (twice my ram)
>> >> /    = remaining space on the 4.3
>> >> /ftp = 3.4 gig (2nd drive, want to set up an ftp server)

>> >Not unreasonable.  It's probably not quite how I would have set it up, but
>> >everyone in this group will have their own idea of how that should be done.

>> >> Alright, it is installing... will have more questions on post installation
>> >> :)

>> >Good luck, and welcome aboard!

>> Totally Jayynes

Totally Jayynes
 
 
 

New to FreeBSD and Hello Everyone

Post by Totally Jayynes » Sun, 11 Nov 2001 09:57:57


GREAT information...  Thanks for the excellent explanation, too.  The
guy at my work kinda gave an explanation that was a bit over my head
at this point as to why he just makes a /swap and a / partition....
but what I took from what he said was that way he never runs out of
space in the / partition.  He also made some kind of referrence to not
going with the Automatially Set Partitions for some sort of Security
reasons.

I am still learning what each of the partitions are bascially used
for, so again, the explanation is much appreciated.  Going to lock
this message for future reference so I don't accidentily delet it :)





>>Hi everyone, I hope I found the right group.  Man, there are a TON of
>>FreeBSD NGs....

>>Anyway, I am BRAND NEW to FreeBSD, trying to get a server or two up
>>and running for my personal use and who knows, maybe run a Quake3
>>server off of one of them when and if I ever get any of this figured
>>out.

>...

>>Set partitions on my two HDs 4.3gig, 3.4 gig.  Use all the space

>>/swap   = 256M (twice my ram)
>>/       = remaining space on the 4.3
>>/ftp    = 3.4 gig (2nd drive, want to set up an ftp server)

>Since you have that much space I'd probably set / to 100MB. Make
>/var and set it between 100MB and 200MB, your swap as is, and put
>the /usr partition for the rest on your first drive.  

>If you ever have a crash, having a reasonably small sized /
>partition makes recovery and if needed, and fsck on that partition,
>must easier/faster.  You WILL wait a bit for fsck'ing 4.3GB.

>One of comment is that if you lose a file-system, usually it's
>related to only one file system, and I've found in most Unix
>systems its the one that / is mounted upon.  If you have to
>reinstall FreeBSD you can preserve a /usr file system on a
>reinstall if it is seeable, even if you have to remake the /
>partition.

>>For the Distribution, I am just installing EVERYTHING, I know it will
>>take longer, but hopefully it will save me time in the future.

>That's pretty much normal for me.  It also makes doing everything
>else much easier.

>Now as to being a 'newbie' we all were at one time, and there
>is a 'newbie' mailing-list.


>In the body of the message put only this.

>lists
>end

>And in a few moments you have a list of a hundred or so FreeBSD
>specific groups including a newbie group.  Browse the rest of the
>list and see what other specific ones you need, and have fun.

Totally Jayynes
 
 
 

New to FreeBSD and Hello Everyone

Post by Bill Vermilli » Sun, 11 Nov 2001 14:06:46




Quote:>GREAT information...  Thanks for the excellent explanation, too.  The
>guy at my work kinda gave an explanation that was a bit over my head
>at this point as to why he just makes a /swap and a / partition....
>but what I took from what he said was that way he never runs out of
>space in the / partition.  He also made some kind of referrence to not
>going with the Automatially Set Partitions for some sort of Security
>reasons.
>I am still learning what each of the partitions are bascially used
>for, so again, the explanation is much appreciated.  Going to lock
>this message for future reference so I don't accidentily delet it :)

As the not running out of space on / - if you set up /usr almost
everything will go there.  You can have /var fill up if you have
things like a lot of mail accounts as /var/mail is the default.

By keeping all user added files - basically all files not needed to
run in a single user mode - on something other than / you will have
what you need in / and never worry about running out of space.
/ should almost be treated as read-only things in /etc such as the
password files, getting added to regularly.

A lot of that is just from school of hard-knocks - having used my
first Unix system in 1983.  A lot just comes from working on many
different hw platforms on many different CPUs. I also have a decent
HW background.

BUT - Unix lets you do things the way you want to do and there
really is no ONE right way.  There are many proper ways and a LOTs
of wrong ways.

The only problem with automatically setting partitions - actually
slices in the BSD world - is that on older systems the default
sizes were a bit too small.  I've not heard of security problems.

Be sure to try   'man hier'.  That gives a complete and detailed
explanation of the file system tree.  

Have fun.  Unix is a lifetime of learning.  And fun if you treat it
properly.

 
 
 

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