disklabel and Seagate ST15230N HAWK 4 Family 4.2GB SCSI

disklabel and Seagate ST15230N HAWK 4 Family 4.2GB SCSI

Post by Jin Guojun[IT » Sat, 11 May 1996 04:00:00



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disklabel and Seagate ST15230N HAWK 4 Family 4.2GB SCSI

Post by Jin Guojun[IT » Sat, 11 May 1996 04:00:00


Does any one has successfully labeled the Seagate hawk-4 4.2 GB disk drives?
Would you please send me the geometry for building the disktab entry?

Here is the problem to disklabel the Seagate hawk-4 4.2 GB disk.

The disklabel acts very like a hardware -- sometimes works, sometimes not.
I do not know why it does that. All I did was on the same type of disks:

        Seagate ST15230N HAWK 4 Family 4.2GB SCSI drive

The things get enev fany when I use dd instead disklabel --

# disklabel sd0
# /dev/rsd0c:
type: SCSI
disk: sd0s1
label:
flags:
bytes/sector: 512
sectors/track: 32      
tracks/cylinder: 64
sectors/cylinder: 2048
cylinders: 4094
sectors/unit: 8384970
rpm: 3600
interleave: 1
trackskew: 0
cylinderskew: 0
headswitch: 0           # milliseconds
track-to-track seek: 0  # milliseconds
drivedata: 0

8 partitions:
#        size   offset    fstype   [fsize bsize bps/cpg]
  a:     8192        0    4.2BSD        0     0     0   # (Cyl.    0 - 3)
  c:  8384970        0    unused        0     0         # (Cyl.    0 - 4094*)
  e:  8376778     8192    4.2BSD        0     0     0   # (Cyl.    4 - 4094*)

----------------------
So, make disktab entry by above information

ST15230N|Seagate HAWK 4 Family 4.2GB SCSI:\
        :dt=SCSI:ty=winchester:se#512:nt#64:ns#32:nc#4094:rm#5411: \
        :pa#8192:oa#0:ta=4.2BSD:ba#4096:fa#512: \
        :pc#8384970:oc#0: \
        :pe#8376778:oe#8192:te=4.2BSD:be#4096:fe#512:
=====================================================

# disklabel sd1
# /dev/rsd1c:
type: SCSI
disk: sd1s1
label:
flags:  
bytes/sector: 512
sectors/track: 16
tracks/cylinder: 18
sectors/cylinder: 288
cylinders: 29114
sectors/unit: 8384970
rpm: 3600  
interleave: 1
trackskew: 0
cylinderskew: 0  
headswitch: 0           # milliseconds
track-to-track seek: 0  # milliseconds
drivedata: 0

8 partitions:
#        size   offset    fstype   [fsize bsize bps/cpg]
  c:  8384970        0    unused        0     0         # (Cyl.    0 - 29114*)
  e:     8192        0    4.2BSD        0     0     0   # (Cyl.    0 - 28*)

--------------------    

# disklabel -w -r sd1 ST15230N
disklabel: ioctl DIOCSDINFO: Open partition would move or shrink

Operation is not acceptable. Why? The geometry is generated by installation
program and succcessfully labeled on sd0.  Then, I tried to use dd to dup
the disk information from sd0 to sd1:

# dd if=/dev/sd0 of=/dev/sd1 bs=8192 count=8192  
8192+0 records in
8192+0 records out
67108864 bytes transferred in 46 secs (1458888 bytes/sec)

# disklabel sd1
# /dev/rsd1c:
type: SCSI
disk: sd1s1
label:
flags:  
bytes/sector: 512
sectors/track: 16
tracks/cylinder: 18
sectors/cylinder: 288
cylinders: 29114
sectors/unit: 8384970
rpm: 3600  
interleave: 1
trackskew: 0
cylinderskew: 0  
headswitch: 0           # milliseconds
track-to-track seek: 0  # milliseconds
drivedata: 0

8 partitions:
#        size   offset    fstype   [fsize bsize bps/cpg]
  c:  8384970        0    unused        0     0         # (Cyl.    0 - 29114*)
  e:     8192        0    4.2BSD        0     0     0   # (Cyl.    0 - 28*)

**************

Entire 64 MBytes data transfered from sd0 to sd1, but sd1 get nothing changed.
??? Where the disklabel stored?  Somethings, this works, but not always.
Just like the disklabel command. ???

The software should act the same way because the instructions will not be
self modified in most case.  How could this happen?

Thanks,

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disklabel and Seagate ST15230N HAWK 4 Family 4.2GB SCSI

Post by J Wuns » Sun, 12 May 1996 04:00:00



>         Seagate ST15230N HAWK 4 Family 4.2GB SCSI drive
> sectors/unit: 8384970

                ^^^^^^^

Is this the same number you can see in the device announcement at boot
time?

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cheers, J"org


Never trust an operating system you don't have sources for. ;-)