new to unix

new to unix

Post by Roger » Fri, 04 Sep 1998 04:00:00



If you have an educational UNIX account already, probably
that is on a Solaris system (a guess).
While Solaris is the real thing today and Sun is the leading
company in the UNIX area, other UNIX versions like FreeBSD and
Linux can be used at home as a complement. OK today you can
get a 'student' release of Solaris very cheap for both intel
and Sun machines, but Solaris requires much more of a PC
machine than FreeBSD or Linux!
FreeBSD and Solaris are not very similar while Linux is
somewhere between. There is more similarities between
Linux and a modern UNIX like Solaris than between FreeBSD
and Solaris.
BSD comes in at least 4 versions with 4 different kernels
FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD and BSDI.
Linux on the other side has only one kernel. There are
today 3 main distributions, Redhat, Slackware and Suse
Linux. If you want to get your hands dirty on UNIX I would
recommend Slackware Linux. There are many opinions here,
but generally Linux is more easy to learn and has much more
documentation. FreeBSD is more for those that already know
a lot about UNIX.
 
 
 

1. HELP NEW USER NEW TO UNIX EVEN

Ok I am making progress with Linux and from what little I do with it I can tell
I love it.
I am still having trouble mounting my dos portion of my hard drive I try
MOUNT /dev/hda1 /mnt

but that dosen't get it done .

here is my question:

How can I access the files that currently are in my win3.1 and dos partition of
my hard drive.
and
Does anyone use <Hyfax> think thats the name fax for Linux and unix based os ?
thanks
Rich

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