Is Linux good at NFS? Or is BSD better?

Is Linux good at NFS? Or is BSD better?

Post by Pak Yin T » Wed, 08 Feb 1995 12:18:36



Hi. I'm trying to set up a lab which has two P90 PC's. I plan to
install Linux (latest release, from Infomagic CD ROM) and install
NFS on these machines. I've heard that Linux is pretty poor at
NFS, is that true? Is it difficult to set up? Will I be better off
getting the BSD from Berkeley? FYI, I have two NEXT's, 1 DEC-Station and
2 SGI Indigo 2 to put together. This is a new lab and I want to
have a better NFS structure to conserve disk space. BYW, what's the
difference between NETBSD-1.0 and FreeBSD-2.0? I'm a pretty new
administrator, but setting up a net from scratch is an excellent
learning opportunity, right? Could any guru's give me some hints?

Thanks.

Fred

P.S. I want to have X-Windows on the PC as well. I have good experience
of installing SCO-Unix, Linux+XFree, but NFS in this kind of
heterogenous environment is my first trial. And my boss wants the net
to be up asap. 8^)

 
 
 

Is Linux good at NFS? Or is BSD better?

Post by Mike Robert Brew » Thu, 09 Feb 1995 22:02:18


I have a manual page directory /usr/man/ with subdirectories man1/
man2/ ... cat1/ cat2/ ...
If I have a file "manpage.1" in man1/ and I type "man manpage", I get
the manpage, but when I'm finished, a "manpage.1.gz" mysteriously
appears in cat1/ without me asking for it. What is it for and why is
it there?
Related, where _should_ I put all my manpage files, given that I would
like them all gzipped?

Thanks!

Mike B.

 
 
 

Is Linux good at NFS? Or is BSD better?

Post by Nick Lindrid » Fri, 10 Feb 1995 09:00:25



: If I have a file "manpage.1" in man1/ and I type "man manpage", I get
: the manpage, but when I'm finished, a "manpage.1.gz" mysteriously
: appears in cat1/ without me asking for it. What is it for and why is
: it there?
: Related, where _should_ I put all my manpage files, given that I would
: like them all gzipped?

Manual entries in man1 etc. are unformatted, and use a text processor to
format them on the fly. Particularly on older and slower machines, this used
considerable machine resources. After formatting, the documents are
written to the corresonding cat directory, which is a cache of ready formatted
documents. More recently, systems have stored these compressed. Having
formatted an entry, you could remove the source file from man, or at least
compress them.

Nick

 
 
 

Is Linux good at NFS? Or is BSD better?

Post by Daniel Quinl » Fri, 10 Feb 1995 06:14:54



Quote:> I have a manual page directory /usr/man/ with subdirectories man1/
> man2/ ... cat1/ cat2/ ...
> If I have a file "manpage.1" in man1/ and I type "man manpage", I get
> the manpage, but when I'm finished, a "manpage.1.gz" mysteriously
> appears in cat1/ without me asking for it. What is it for and why is
> it there?
> Related, where _should_ I put all my manpage files, given that I would
> like them all gzipped?

catman pages are preformatted.  The next time you try to read one, it
is already there (gzipped) and it comes up very quickly.
Uncompressing a small manual page is very quick -- almost
instantaneous.

If you want to not have preformatted pages, remove the cat?
directories (either in /var/catman or /usr/man).

Manual pages should appear on your manual path (MANPATH) in a standard
subdirectory like man1, man2, etc.

--
Daniel Quinlan

 
 
 

Is Linux good at NFS? Or is BSD better?

Post by Steve Wo » Fri, 10 Feb 1995 04:30:05



: I have a manual page directory /usr/man/ with subdirectories man1/
: man2/ ... cat1/ cat2/ ...
: If I have a file "manpage.1" in man1/ and I type "man manpage", I get
: the manpage, but when I'm finished, a "manpage.1.gz" mysteriously
: appears in cat1/ without me asking for it. What is it for and why is
: it there?
: Related, where _should_ I put all my manpage files, given that I would
: like them all gzipped?

I've been having problems along the same lines.  One thing I noticed was
that you do seem to need to have groff installed to view some of the man
pages.  In spite of something saying you don't have to have it just to
read preformatted manpages.

I currently have a few man pages which just show up blank when you try to
view them.  Example:  man openwin.  I do have the directory in the
manpath, and am able to read other pages in the directory, but not this one.

 
 
 

Is Linux good at NFS? Or is BSD better?

Post by Colin James Wyn » Fri, 10 Feb 1995 23:38:26




> : I have a manual page directory /usr/man/ with subdirectories man1/
> : man2/ ... cat1/ cat2/ ...
> : If I have a file "manpage.1" in man1/ and I type "man manpage", I get
> : the manpage, but when I'm finished, a "manpage.1.gz" mysteriously
> : appears in cat1/ without me asking for it. What is it for and why is
> : it there?
> : Related, where _should_ I put all my manpage files, given that I would
> : like them all gzipped?
> I've been having problems along the same lines.  One thing I noticed was
> that you do seem to need to have groff installed to view some of the man
> pages.  In spite of something saying you don't have to have it just to
> read preformatted manpages.
> I currently have a few man pages which just show up blank when you try to
> view them.  Example:  man openwin.  I do have the directory in the
> manpath, and am able to read other pages in the directory, but not this one.

Under a given */man directory, you will find oodles of directories,
named (more or less) man[1-9] and cat[1-9].  Under man/man? you will
find raw groff (or nroff or troff---I don't know the difference) code
for the manpages.  *roff is a document language system similar to TeX.
All the highlights and other fancy things can be entered as text,
local macros defined and so forth.

When you call man foo, the man command searches the directories in
$MANPATH, searching first under the cat directories for entries.
Under cat?, you find the (optionally gnuzipped) text files which have
already been formatted by groff.  That is, *man/cat1/foo.1 can be seen
directly through less, more or and hence, I suppose, the name) cat.

Unless you can think of a good reason to keep them, you probably do
not need the groff versions of the man pages which have already been
formatted.  I, in fact, do not even have groff on my machine---I
ported my unformatted man pages over to a friend's Linux box, ran a
shell script to format them, and then brought the man/cat?/* files
back.  Now  have manpages.  As man ships to an arbitrary $PAGER,
something like zmore or zless can be used such that the cat-pages may
be kept in compressed format.

This is probably more than you really cared to hear about man pages,
right? :-)

CJW

--
**********************************************************************
    /\       Colin J. Wynne             Washington and Lee University
   (())                                      Lexington, *ia

 /______\  
/________\   Be an equal opportunity employer:
                                     Hire the morally handicapped.
**********************************************************************

 
 
 

1. This clone thing...am I stupid, or am I right?


says...

I admire your passion, Chris..

The only issues which have kept myself from looking seriously at Linux
would be:

* It's Unix and the learning curve to start getting productive strikes me
as probably very steep

* It doesn't support plug-and-play.  If your hardware doesn't have Linux
drivers, it don't play..

* Not nearly the amount of developers out there doing stuff for Linux as
there are for Wintel.  Can I get MS Office for Linux?  Can I get
Photoshop for Linux?  Can I get QuarkXpress for Linux? etc.. a big turn
off for me.

--
Reuben King
Email: "reuben at texas dot net" (in plain english to foil spam-bots.
grrr!)

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