Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by DanielSB » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 12:01:18



Hello,

As a longtime user of DOS, Windows, and a little Macintosh (but not
UNIX systems), I have found myself interested in looking into learning
a new operating system, one that i'd actually have to use a manual to
learn! I've been reading about Linux and other UNIX systems (largely a
matter of finding "For Dummies" books in Barnes and Noble), and find
it quite intruiging - and i've got an old Windows 98 computer
relegated to playing MS-DOS games that my new XP system doesn't
swallow. I am considering giving the old computer a dual-boot with
Linux or one of the other open-source UNIX systems. Anyway, i have a
few questions:

1. Which distributions of Linux or another free UNIX (preferably free
as in beer, downloadable ones) are relatively simple to install, offer
a non-destructive repartitioning program (don't want to re-install
tons of programs, and the old system lacks a back-up device), and work
well with generic/strange/brand-X hardware that, to borrow Microsoft
terminology, not exactly 110% DirectX compatible?
1a. I've heard of distributions that take up 4 megabytes of RAM and a
floppy disk, and i've heard of distributions that take up 128
megabytes of RAM and 5 gigabytes of space. I think something in the
middle would be best, as the machine has 56 megs of RAM and i'd like
to make the Linux partition 4-5 gigabytes in size with room on the
disk left over for other programs, data files, and free space.
1b. I've read that vi and ed, the old UNIX editors, are very difficult
to use. As someone who has grown soft under Windows, i'm not enamored
at using a line editor or a command-line-based text editor. I've heard
emacs, pico, and joe were better in this regard. Are any of these in
Linux distributions? Also, as a casual programmer who is past "hello,
world!" but isn't quite up to professional standards, are there any
good full-screen Java or C++ tools out there (command lines are great
for file managment and quickly loading commands, but i'd rather have a
full-screen compiler like Turbo's old Pascal and C++ compilers)?

2. I'm planning on downloading the system from the new computer to the
CD writer and send stuff to the old computer's CD-ROM that way - is
this a good idea?

3. Anything available that will allow MS-DOS games (notably, Football
Pro (like too much to give up and not enough to buy a new, similar
game!), the original Simcity (the classic simulator), and others) work
on a Linux system?

4. Any top-of-the-line free as in both speech and beer tools and
programs highly recommended? This computer isn't going to be online
(which i've heard is supposed to be a UNIX strength!), as cable modem
bills for one computer are high enough and i don't think Comcast makes
Linux drivers for the high-speed modem. However, are there any good
Powerpoint substitutes, games, or other good tools out there, perhaps
a defragmenter?

5. Any recommended online guides or manuals?

-DanielSBen

 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by mjt » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 12:15:31


[snip]

Quote:> 1. Which distributions of Linux or another free UNIX (preferably free
> as in beer, downloadable ones) are relatively simple to install, offer
> a non-destructive repartitioning program (don't want to re-install
> tons of programs, and the old system lacks a back-up device), and work
> well with generic/strange/brand-X hardware that, to borrow Microsoft
> terminology, not exactly 110% DirectX compatible?

... well, i would recommend suse, but you'd have to either:
1) purchase it
2) do the ftp install (for the 'free' part), but i am hesitant
   to recommmend this. but hey, you could pull it off. you download
   a file that gets burned to CD, you run it and install the system
   via ftp from suse.

the next best thing is to download/install mandrake(.com). it's
quick and easy and good for the first-timer.

Quote:> 1b. I've read that vi and ed, the old UNIX editors, are very difficult
> to use. As someone who has grown soft under Windows, i'm not enamored
> at using a line editor or a command-line-based text editor. I've heard

there are plenty of "regular" text editors. i like to use slickedit(.com),
but that is a commercial product (i've used it for years, so that's my
excuse). i also like nedit or scite for the occassional edit. there are
many others to choose from.

Quote:> emacs, pico, and joe were better in this regard. Are any of these in
> Linux distributions?

yes.

Quote:> Also, as a casual programmer who is past "hello,
> world!" but isn't quite up to professional standards, are there any
> good full-screen Java or C++ tools out there (command lines are great
> for file managment and quickly loading commands, but i'd rather have a
> full-screen compiler like Turbo's old Pascal and C++ compilers)?

... absolutely. anjuta and kdevelop come to mind. you might want to
check out borland's kylix - it gives you both c++ and delphi.

Quote:> 2. I'm planning on downloading the system from the new computer to the
> CD writer and send stuff to the old computer's CD-ROM that way - is
> this a good idea?

if you're saying you're gonna burn the CD's on the new system and
boot the CDs/install on the older box, yes, that is fine.

[snip]

Quote:> 4. Any top-of-the-line free as in both speech and beer tools and
> programs highly recommended? This computer isn't going to be online
> (which i've heard is supposed to be a UNIX strength!), as cable modem
> bills for one computer are high enough and i don't think Comcast makes
> Linux drivers for the high-speed modem. However, are there any good
> Powerpoint substitutes, games, or other good tools out there, perhaps
> a defragmenter?

dont need a defragger. most all cable modems are supported. you
might think about, since you have 2 boxes, using a router; let
it log in and let your boxes log (DHCP) to the router. powerpoint?
i dunno. there's openoffice.org.

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Michael J. Tobler: motorcyclist, surfer,  #    Black holes result
 skydiver, and author: "Inside Linux",     #   when God divides the  
 "C++ HowTo", "C++ Unleashed"              #     universe by zero

 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by Jim Kroge » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 14:28:05


I've recently trod this road.

My suggestions:

Get Redhat.   When you know more you may wish to switch, but for now
it's easiest to get going with. It's by far the most used.  

Download the rpm images and burn them to a CD. INstall from the CDs.

You can get crossover to run MS Word and other MS applications under
Linux. I don't know if it will do all Win apps.

You'll have problems.  There are lots of places to get help but none
nearly as good as the comp.os.linux groups.

Jim

 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by Jim Kroge » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 14:30:19


Oh yeah:

Get open office. It's a copy of MS office, pretty compatible, and free.  
Also, get gimp. Photoshop clone.

Then get apache, set up a web site, and get rich.

Jim

 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by DanielSB » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 23:07:43




> [snip]
> > 1. Which distributions of Linux or another free UNIX (preferably free
> > as in beer, downloadable ones) are relatively simple to install, offer
> > a non-destructive repartitioning program (don't want to re-install
> > tons of programs, and the old system lacks a back-up device), and work
> > well with generic/strange/brand-X hardware that, to borrow Microsoft
> > terminology, not exactly 110% DirectX compatible?

> ... well, i would recommend suse, but you'd have to either:
> 1) purchase it
> 2) do the ftp install (for the 'free' part), but i am hesitant
>    to recommmend this. but hey, you could pull it off. you download
>    a file that gets burned to CD, you run it and install the system
>    via ftp from suse.

> the next best thing is to download/install mandrake(.com). it's
> quick and easy and good for the first-timer.

Is it better than RedHat or UnitedLinux?

Quote:> > 1b. I've read that vi and ed, the old UNIX editors, are very difficult
> > to use. As someone who has grown soft under Windows, i'm not enamored
> > at using a line editor or a command-line-based text editor. I've heard

> there are plenty of "regular" text editors. i like to use slickedit(.com),
> but that is a commercial product (i've used it for years, so that's my
> excuse). i also like nedit or scite for the occassional edit. there are
> many others to choose from.

If i'm getting a commercial product, i figure i might as well spring
for a full fledged word processor!

- Show quoted text -

Quote:> > emacs, pico, and joe were better in this regard. Are any of these in
> > Linux distributions?

> yes.

> > Also, as a casual programmer who is past "hello,
> > world!" but isn't quite up to professional standards, are there any
> > good full-screen Java or C++ tools out there (command lines are great
> > for file managment and quickly loading commands, but i'd rather have a
> > full-screen compiler like Turbo's old Pascal and C++ compilers)?

> ... absolutely. anjuta and kdevelop come to mind. you might want to
> check out borland's kylix - it gives you both c++ and delphi.

> > 2. I'm planning on downloading the system from the new computer to the
> > CD writer and send stuff to the old computer's CD-ROM that way - is
> > this a good idea?

> if you're saying you're gonna burn the CD's on the new system and
> boot the CDs/install on the older box, yes, that is fine.

Yes. That's another thing - i'd like the distribution to be one-cd, if
possible.

Quote:> [snip]
> > 4. Any top-of-the-line free as in both speech and beer tools and
> > programs highly recommended? This computer isn't going to be online
> > (which i've heard is supposed to be a UNIX strength!), as cable modem
> > bills for one computer are high enough and i don't think Comcast makes
> > Linux drivers for the high-speed modem. However, are there any good
> > Powerpoint substitutes, games, or other good tools out there, perhaps
> > a defragmenter?

> dont need a defragger. most all cable modems are supported. you
> might think about, since you have 2 boxes, using a router; let
> it log in and let your boxes log (DHCP) to the router. powerpoint?
> i dunno. there's openoffice.org.

hmm... okay.

-DanielSBen

 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by DanielSB » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 23:08:13



> I've recently trod this road.

> My suggestions:

> Get Redhat.   When you know more you may wish to switch, but for now
> it's easiest to get going with. It's by far the most used.  

> Download the rpm images and burn them to a CD. INstall from the CDs.

> You can get crossover to run MS Word and other MS applications under
> Linux. I don't know if it will do all Win apps.

> You'll have problems.  There are lots of places to get help but none
> nearly as good as the comp.os.linux groups.

> Jim

Aha! Self-adverti*t!
 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by DanielSB » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 23:10:41



> Oh yeah:

> Get open office. It's a copy of MS office, pretty compatible, and free.  
> Also, get gimp. Photoshop clone.

> Then get apache, set up a web site, and get rich.

> Jim

How does one get rich off setting up a web server? selling sites
bandwidth (this is an old computer, after all - and hardly a candidate
for a server)? Offering for-sale site mugs?

-DanielSBen

 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by mjt » Wed, 02 Jul 2003 11:09:01



> Get Redhat.   When you know more you may wish to switch, but for now
> it's easiest to get going with. It's by far the most used.

.... which doesnt necessarily make it the 'best' :)
.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Michael J. Tobler: motorcyclist, surfer,  #    Black holes result
 skydiver, and author: "Inside Linux",     #   when God divides the  
 "C++ HowTo", "C++ Unleashed"              #     universe by zero
 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by mjt » Wed, 02 Jul 2003 11:14:52


[snip]

Quote:>> the next best thing is to download/install mandrake(.com). it's
>> quick and easy and good for the first-timer.

> Is it better than RedHat or UnitedLinux?

.... unitedlinux is really targetted for corporate use. redhat
is just another distro, just like the hundreds of others. RH,
suse, mandrake, and so on all have their own nitch. mandrake
is know for ease of installation for the first-timer. you can
always switch later to something else if you like.

[snip]

Quote:>> there are plenty of "regular" text editors. i like to use
>> slickedit(.com), but that is a commercial product (i've used it for
>> years, so that's my excuse). i also like nedit or scite for the
>> occassional edit. there are many others to choose from.

> If i'm getting a commercial product, i figure i might as well spring
> for a full fledged word processor!

....you're confusing editors with word-processors, which are
two different animals. when i say editor, it is merely that,
a text editor or programmer editor. a word processor is something
different, designed to build office documents. i cited both nedit
and scite - these are both editors.

Quote:>> if you're saying you're gonna burn the CD's on the new system and
>> boot the CDs/install on the older box, yes, that is fine.

> Yes. That's another thing - i'd like the distribution to be one-cd, if
> possible.

mandrake installs from one cd. you might also check out:
www.knoppix.com. you can run that directly from the CD,
without installing it, if you just want to check things
out, Linux-wise. afterwards, if you like it, you CAN
install knoppix on your drive.
.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Michael J. Tobler: motorcyclist, surfer,  #    Black holes result
 skydiver, and author: "Inside Linux",     #   when God divides the  
 "C++ HowTo", "C++ Unleashed"              #     universe by zero
 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by Xyer » Thu, 03 Jul 2003 00:43:06


Use Knoppix.
 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by DanielSB » Thu, 03 Jul 2003 02:48:31





> [snip]
> >> the next best thing is to download/install mandrake(.com). it's
> >> quick and easy and good for the first-timer.

> > Is it better than RedHat or UnitedLinux?

> .... unitedlinux is really targetted for corporate use. redhat
> is just another distro, just like the hundreds of others. RH,
> suse, mandrake, and so on all have their own nitch. mandrake
> is know for ease of installation for the first-timer. you can
> always switch later to something else if you like.

> [snip]
> >> there are plenty of "regular" text editors. i like to use
> >> slickedit(.com), but that is a commercial product (i've used it for
> >> years, so that's my excuse). i also like nedit or scite for the
> >> occassional edit. there are many others to choose from.

> > If i'm getting a commercial product, i figure i might as well spring
> > for a full fledged word processor!

> ....you're confusing editors with word-processors, which are
> two different animals. when i say editor, it is merely that,
> a text editor or programmer editor. a word processor is something
> different, designed to build office documents. i cited both nedit
> and scite - these are both editors.

I know there is a difference. But why pay money for a plain text
editor when there are so many out there for free (like xemacs) or
bundled with other stuff
(like notepad, or the KDE or GNOME text editors).

Quote:> >> if you're saying you're gonna burn the CD's on the new system and
> >> boot the CDs/install on the older box, yes, that is fine.

> > Yes. That's another thing - i'd like the distribution to be one-cd, if
> > possible.

> mandrake installs from one cd. you might also check out:
> www.knoppix.com. you can run that directly from the CD,
> without installing it, if you just want to check things
> out, Linux-wise. afterwards, if you like it, you CAN
> install knoppix on your drive.
> .

Small problem: my old computer only boots from the 3.5" floppy and the
hard drive - not the CD-ROM! do i make a boot disk as if i were to
install it?

-DanielSBen

 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by mjt » Thu, 03 Jul 2003 08:58:13



> I know there is a difference. But why pay money for a plain text
> editor when there are so many out there for free (like xemacs) or
> bundled with other stuff
> (like notepad, or the KDE or GNOME text editors).

... why? because slickedit blows them all away
.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Michael J. Tobler: motorcyclist, surfer,  #    Black holes result
 skydiver, and author: "Inside Linux",     #   when God divides the  
 "C++ HowTo", "C++ Unleashed"              #     universe by zero
 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by Xyer » Thu, 03 Jul 2003 18:11:27



> Use Knoppix.

And then once you're happy with that go for some User Mode Linux.

http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/index.html

Go on. You know you want to. You can't hurt it. ;)

 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by DanielSB » Thu, 03 Jul 2003 23:21:53




> > I know there is a difference. But why pay money for a plain text
> > editor when there are so many out there for free (like xemacs) or
> > bundled with other stuff
> > (like notepad, or the KDE or GNOME text editors).

> ... why? because slickedit blows them all away
> .

If it works, is easy to use, and doesn't crash on you (hell, even MS
Windows Notepad is good on that regard!), why bother? I generally find
text editors most useful for jotting quick notes, editing system
files, or writing files that many different computers can understand
(MS-DOS/Windows, Mac, OS/2, BeOS, Unix/Linux, all understand the
humble ASCII text file). Whenever Windows has an "illegal operations"
error, i would also copy all the*hex details to a text file
called "Errors". For what little coding i do, i use a full-screen
editor/compiler/de* like Free Pascal, and for documents that
don't need to be understood by everybody, i use Word or Wordperfect.
For me, i don't need to pony up for a text editor - there are tons
that suit me either bundled with OSes (every OS has at least one!) or
freely downloadable from the internet. If you have heavy-duty
text-editing or text-processing needs, i suppose slickedit is right
for you, though.

-DanielSBen

 
 
 

Questions from newbie about a Linux installation?

Post by mjt » Fri, 04 Jul 2003 08:33:34



> text-editing or text-processing needs, i suppose slickedit is right
> for you, though.

... for those of us that have heavy-duty coding, slickedit is a
dream. some of the cool features are extensive for this programmer's
editor. believe it or not, i use the 'block, copy-n-paste' quite
a bit. diffzilla is a awesome differencing tool, as is the project
manager, code completion, jakarta/ant support, cvs support, etc etc.
i just got the new LinuxFormat mag (42), in which VSE is reviewed.
two 10's and two 9's sum up the review scores
.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Michael J. Tobler: motorcyclist, surfer,  #    Black holes result
 skydiver, and author: "Inside Linux",     #   when God divides the  
 "C++ HowTo", "C++ Unleashed"              #     universe by zero
 
 
 

1. Newbie: Linux installation installation

Hello!

I am trying to install the Linux for the first time.
I am more habitual of MS products and was fed up with the corruption and
monopoly of MS so I decided to use Linux.

After partitioning the hard drive by Linux (Red Hat) by Fdisk I got the
following:

Current disk partitions:

Mount point     Device  Requested       Actual          Type
                hda1    590M            590M            Linux native
                hda2    127M            127M            Linux swap

Drive Summaries:
Drive           Geom[C/H/S]     Total     Used     Free
hda             [525/64/63]     10333     718      315    [#####    ]

Now when I press [Done]

System gives the following message:

You must assign a root (/) partition to a native to a Linux partition (
ext2) for the installation to proceed.

Can anyone tell how to proceed? How can I assign a root partition???

Thanks a ton!!

Regards

Naren

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