#including <bsd/signal.h>: no include path

#including <bsd/signal.h>: no include path

Post by Tessa L » Thu, 02 Mar 1995 13:25:45



I've stumbled across some code which tries to #include <bsd/signal.h>,
but I get the error message:

/usr/include/bsd/signal.h:7: No include path in which to find signal.h

I get the same error if I try to compile a dummy C-program which
includes this header file:

====begin test.c====
#include <bsd/signal.h>

int main()
{

Quote:}

====end test.c====

% gcc test.c
In file included from test.c:1:
/usr/include/bsd/signal.h:7: No include path in which to find signal.h

This is with kernel version 1.1.54, gcc 2.5.8, libc 4.5.26.  I think
this has to do with the strange #include_next statement at the top of
bsd/signal.h.  Can someone please enlighten me?

Thanks in advance!

--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tessa Lau               And I find it kind of funny / I find it kind of sad
CS/A&EP '95         The dreams in which I'm dying

 
 
 

#including <bsd/signal.h>: no include path

Post by Jason Van Patt » Thu, 02 Mar 1995 21:55:02


: I've stumbled across some code which tries to #include <bsd/signal.h>,
: but I get the error message:

: /usr/include/bsd/signal.h:7: No include path in which to find signal.h

        I saw this same sort of problem, and to solve it, I just used
-I/usr/include as a compiler flag.  I know, you really shouldn't _have_ to do
that, and I agree.  It was the only way I could get around it.

        Someone have a better answer?

                                                Jason

--
Jason Van Patten                  | If at first you don't succeed, keep |
Clarkson University               | on sucking till you do succeed.     |

                                  |                 (The Three Stooges) |
            ** Any opinions expressed here are actually
               yours, you just don't know it, yet. **

 
 
 

#including <bsd/signal.h>: no include path

Post by Daniel Barl » Fri, 03 Mar 1995 16:37:34





>: I've stumbled across some code which tries to #include <bsd/signal.h>,
>: but I get the error message:

>: /usr/include/bsd/signal.h:7: No include path in which to find signal.h

>    I saw this same sort of problem, and to solve it, I just used
>-I/usr/include as a compiler flag.  I know, you really shouldn't _have_ to do
>that, and I agree.  It was the only way I could get around it.

>    Someone have a better answer?

As far as I can work out from the headers concerned, no program should
include <bsd/signal.h>.  Programs that need BSD signal behaviour
should instead put -I/usr/include/bsd in the gcc command line, so that
when that file does `#include_next <signal.h>' it can find the normal
version.

So, delete the #include line.  If the program needs BSD signal
functions, add -I/usr/include/bsd to the CFLAGS.

Disclaimer: this advice is based on my own experience of compiling
xlockmore, and does not constitute official advice.  I Could Be Wrong!

Daniel
--

``Our single posting of 6,000 was a drop in a huge bucket''
                                -- Canter & Siegel, to the Tenessee Bar

 
 
 

#including <bsd/signal.h>: no include path

Post by Louis J. LaBash J » Sun, 05 Mar 1995 07:44:31


: I've stumbled across some code which tries to #include <bsd/signal.h>,
: but I get the error message:

: /usr/include/bsd/signal.h:7: No include path in which to find signal.h

: I get the same error if I try to compile a dummy C-program which
: includes this header file:

: ====begin test.c====
: #include <bsd/signal.h>

: int main()
: {
: }
: ====end test.c====

See Mitchum DSouza's GCC-FAQ, it's on "sunsite.unc.edu":/pub/Linux/docs/faqs.

--