/etc/inetd wrecks my ability to tredir 25 25 [aRe: tredir ...]

/etc/inetd wrecks my ability to tredir 25 25 [aRe: tredir ...]

Post by Eric Nels » Mon, 24 Jan 1994 19:28:52



If I let /etc/rc.net call inetd, then I get the Port busy message from
tredir 25 25.  If I leave it out, all my term stuff works, but my regular
term and ftp now say invalid argument to connect, or connection refused when
I try to telnet myself (this is not really a big deal, and I save a little
memory, but I'd rather know how to make them both work simultaneously)
this is a follow up to some info I got which did allow me to smail through
term (thanks!!!!!)
  any ideas what is going on here... can I tell inetd to leave port 25 alone?
thanks... eric
 
 
 

/etc/inetd wrecks my ability to tredir 25 25 [aRe: tredir ...]

Post by Dan Min » Mon, 24 Jan 1994 22:11:11




>If I let /etc/rc.net call inetd, then I get the Port busy message from
>tredir 25 25.  If I leave it out, all my term stuff works, but my regular
>term and ftp now say invalid argument to connect, or connection refused when
>I try to telnet myself (this is not really a big deal, and I save a little
>memory, but I'd rather know how to make them both work simultaneously)
>this is a follow up to some info I got which did allow me to smail through
>term (thanks!!!!!)
>  any ideas what is going on here... can I tell inetd to leave port 25 alone?
>thanks... eric

inetd is the Internet super server.  From what I understand, it sits there
and listens on specific ports (23 is telnet, 20,21 are ftp, etc).  WHen
something "knocks", it starts up the correct programs/daemons.
[This is right, gang?]

Anyway, by not starting inetd, you have no network.  *grin*  That's why
the term stuff works.  Nothing has taken those port addresses.
It looks like you want smtp.  Just edit the /etc files that refer
to the smtp program and port number 25..  That should free that port.
BUT be sure to backup those files just in case.... *grin*

Good luck,
Dan

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