oversized X windows

oversized X windows

Post by Dan Jacobso » Wed, 30 Aug 2000 04:00:00



In windows98 land, I'm used to windows starting out mid-sized, and one
clicks on them to make them full sized... in Mandrake7.0 X land, many
windows start out oversized [bottom & side beyond the edge of the
glass!!!], and one clicks to make them full sized.  Is this due to
developers working on 800x600 screens and not thinking about us 640x480
users on 15" monitors?
--
www.geocities.com/jidanni  ... fix e-mail address to reply; ?n|
Tel:+886-4-5854780; starting in year 2001: +886-4-25854780
 
 
 

oversized X windows

Post by TheCentralScrutinizer... » Wed, 30 Aug 2000 04:00:00



>In windows98 land, I'm used to windows starting out mid-sized, and one
>clicks on them to make them full sized... in Mandrake7.0 X land, many
>windows start out oversized [bottom & side beyond the edge of the
>glass!!!], and one clicks to make them full sized.  Is this due to
>developers working on 800x600 screens and not thinking about us 640x480
>users on 15" monitors?

Yup.  Using 640x480 is like using a 22 character wide display on a vic-20.

 
 
 

oversized X windows

Post by Alan Shutk » Wed, 30 Aug 2000 04:00:00



> Is this due to developers working on 800x600 screens and not
> thinking about us 640x480 users on 15" monitors?

Actually, it's due to developers working at 1024x768 (at the minimum)
for the last ten years or so and not thinking about 640x480 at all.  X
apps traditionally expect at least a 1024x768 screen, although with
some effort you can make things fit, usually.

First, decide if you really need to be running at 640x480.  That's a
very low resolution, and most 15" monitors can run at 1024x768 without
a problem, which would save you quite a bit of hassle.  Even moving up
to 800x600 will make things easier for you.

If you can't change the resolution, because it's an LCD screen or you
have trouble reading the screen at higher resolutions, you can try
shrinking font sizes for apps to make things take up less space.  Both
Gnome and KDE let you specify the default font sizes, and reducing
them will make more programs fit on screen.  (You can do the same with
other apps using X resources, but I don't have a good pointer to info
on that, and it can be a bit tricky to explain.)

If this isn't enough to make things fit, you might consider using a
virtual desktop with X, by adding a

Virtual 1024 768

line in the Display subsection of your XF86Config file.  This will let
you have a larger desktop, and you can pan to display 640x480 segments
by rolling the mouse into the side of the screen.  It's not ideal, but
it's better than nothing.

--

73 days, 19 hours, 7 minutes, 32 seconds till we run away.
Since GOD spelled backwards is DOG, is my poodle Satan?

 
 
 

oversized X windows

Post by Chris Jackso » Wed, 30 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Try slapping ctrl-alt-+ sometime also.


> > First, decide if you really need to be running at 640x480.  That's a
> > very low resolution, and most 15" monitors can run at 1024x768 without
> > a problem, which would save you quite a bit of hassle.  Even moving up
> > to 800x600 will make things easier for you.

> Ok, sounds good, my new Lemel 15" monitor should be up to the task.

> > If you can't change the resolution, because it's an LCD screen or you
> > have trouble reading the screen at higher resolutions, you can try

> that's me---words are too tiny

> > shrinking font sizes for apps to make things take up less space.  Both

> perhaps I misunderstand... but won't that make words even more tiny?

> > Gnome and KDE let you specify the default font sizes, and reducing
> > them will make more programs fit on screen.  (You can do the same with
> > other apps using X resources, but I don't have a good pointer to info
> > on that, and it can be a bit tricky to explain.)

> Sure hope there's a clean way; by the way, I note that many panels' OK/No
> choice buttons lie below the glass, and one must drag them above to
> finalize... and, e.g., netscape's configuration menus are undragable in
> this situation, therefore I won't be able to initialize netscape's
> scripts, prologing my need for MS browser...
> --
> www.geocities.com/jidanni  ... fix e-mail address to reply; ???
> Tel:+886-4-5854780; starting in year 2001: +886-4-25854780

 
 
 

oversized X windows

Post by Dan Jacobso » Thu, 31 Aug 2000 06:01:26



Quote:> First, decide if you really need to be running at 640x480.  That's a
> very low resolution, and most 15" monitors can run at 1024x768 without
> a problem, which would save you quite a bit of hassle.  Even moving up
> to 800x600 will make things easier for you.

Ok, sounds good, my new Lemel 15" monitor should be up to the task.

Quote:> If you can't change the resolution, because it's an LCD screen or you
> have trouble reading the screen at higher resolutions, you can try

that's me---words are too tiny

Quote:> shrinking font sizes for apps to make things take up less space.  Both

perhaps I misunderstand... but won't that make words even more tiny?

Quote:> Gnome and KDE let you specify the default font sizes, and reducing
> them will make more programs fit on screen.  (You can do the same with
> other apps using X resources, but I don't have a good pointer to info
> on that, and it can be a bit tricky to explain.)

Sure hope there's a clean way; by the way, I note that many panels' OK/No
choice buttons lie below the glass, and one must drag them above to
finalize... and, e.g., netscape's configuration menus are undragable in
this situation, therefore I won't be able to initialize netscape's
scripts, prologing my need for MS browser...
--
www.geocities.com/jidanni  ... fix e-mail address to reply; ???
Tel:+886-4-5854780; starting in year 2001: +886-4-25854780
 
 
 

oversized X windows

Post by Jim Townsen » Thu, 31 Aug 2000 04:00:00



> In windows98 land, I'm used to windows starting out mid-sized, and one
> clicks on them to make them full sized... in Mandrake7.0 X land, many
> windows start out oversized [bottom & side beyond the edge of the
> glass!!!], and one clicks to make them full sized.  

It isn't Mandrake, it's the X-window system.  It will be the same in all
distros.

I'll bet you're running Gnome..  I've found Gnome is bad for oversized,
offscreen windows when you're running under 800x600 resolution.   KDE
doesn't seem to do it...  The KDE developers take into account how big
your screen is.

Jim.

 
 
 

oversized X windows

Post by Richard Kimb » Sat, 02 Sep 2000 05:05:02


Quote:>Sure hope there's a clean way; by the way, I note that many panels' OK/No
>choice buttons lie below the glass, and one must drag them above to
>finalize... and, e.g., netscape's configuration menus are undragable in
>this situation, therefore I won't be able to initialize netscape's
>scripts, prologing my need for MS browser...

I get this behaviour even on my 1024x768.  Though with most apps it's possible
to re-size the window, so it's usually only a problem the first time I use a
program.  That still leaves the question of why software authors create the
problem in the first place.

--
Richard Kimber

Political Science Resources
http://www.psr.keele.ac.uk/

 
 
 

oversized X windows

Post by Derek M. Fly » Sat, 02 Sep 2000 05:19:52



> >Sure hope there's a clean way; by the way, I note that many panels' OK/No
> >choice buttons lie below the glass, and one must drag them above to
> >finalize... and, e.g., netscape's configuration menus are undragable in
> >this situation, therefore I won't be able to initialize netscape's
> >scripts, prologing my need for MS browser...

> I get this behaviour even on my 1024x768.  Though with most apps it's possible
> to re-size the window, so it's usually only a problem the first time I use a
> program.  That still leaves the question of why software authors create the
> problem in the first place.

An X client's postion and size is not its choice. The window manager is
responsible for deciding where a window is placed and how large it should
be.  There are a plethora of well documented, almost arbitrarily configurable
window managers.  Pick one, and read the documentation for its configuration.