X works fine in laptop mode, won't load in docked mode.

X works fine in laptop mode, won't load in docked mode.

Post by Eddie Luk » Sun, 31 Mar 2002 17:06:21



Hello. This is my first message here, but I hope it's not my last. I
am a newbie to Linux, but I've taken a couple classes. I apologize if
I misuse a term here or there, but hey, I'm learning. :)

I finally took the plunge and installed Red Hat 7.2  on my computer,
which is a Dell Inspiron 8000 laptop. With the help of resources like
linux-laptop.net, I was able to install it just fine. When I use Linux
in laptop mode, everything works great. X loads up fine, KDE looks
wonderful, the whole shebang goes swimmingly.

The problem is when I dock the laptop. Kudzu detects the network
interface built into the dock, and detects the USB mouse plugged into
the hub built into my monitor, a Sony HMD-A400. When it's time for X
to come up, the screen goes black and the power light turns yellow, as
if it is getting no signal.

I went so far as to attempt to install Red Hat with the computer
docked. Using the installation tool, I tried out different resolutions
and color depths with the "test settings" button... Every single one I
tried gives me the black screen, yellow light dead monitor.

It seems like the only conclusion to make is to make is that my
monitor is incompatible with X. I just wanted to get some input from
some more knowlegable people than myself.

Here are some more details about my system which my prove useful: Dell
Inspiron 8000, Pentium III 850MHz, 512MB RAM, ATI Rage Mobility M4 AGP
video card,

Thank you for any help you may be able to provide.
Eddie Lukin

 
 
 

X works fine in laptop mode, won't load in docked mode.

Post by Peter T. Breue » Sun, 31 Mar 2002 23:27:53



> The problem is when I dock the laptop. Kudzu detects the network
> interface built into the dock, and detects the USB mouse plugged into

Well, there's nothing wrong with that, is there? If you don't like it,
get rid of kudzu (I would, if I were you!) or beat it senseless.

Quote:> the hub built into my monitor, a Sony HMD-A400. When it's time for X
> to come up, the screen goes black and the power light turns yellow, as
> if it is getting no signal.

But is it? Be specific. The indication is that you want to use a
differnet  "ModeLine" for your monitor than for your laptop screen.
That's fine, and to be expected. So write yourself one and use it. See
the XF86 Video Timings HOWTO.

Quote:> I went so far as to attempt to install Red Hat with the computer

Why? If you have a problem, solve it! Don't do somethinbg else.

Peter

 
 
 

X works fine in laptop mode, won't load in docked mode.

Post by Eddie Luk » Mon, 01 Apr 2002 03:29:21


On Sat, 30 Mar 2002 15:27:53 +0100, "Peter T. Breuer"



>> The problem is when I dock the laptop. Kudzu detects the network
>> interface built into the dock, and detects the USB mouse plugged into

>Well, there's nothing wrong with that, is there? If you don't like it,
>get rid of kudzu (I would, if I were you!) or beat it senseless.

Well, that wasn't the problem. The problem was the whole monitor
thing. kudzu finding my mouse and NIC was good... Not being able to
set up the monitor was not.

Quote:

>> the hub built into my monitor, a Sony HMD-A400. When it's time for X
>> to come up, the screen goes black and the power light turns yellow, as
>> if it is getting no signal.

>But is it? Be specific. The indication is that you want to use a
>differnet  "ModeLine" for your monitor than for your laptop screen.
>That's fine, and to be expected. So write yourself one and use it. See
>the XF86 Video Timings HOWTO.

I'm not sure if it is or not... When I'm in the Red Hat installer
trying to configure the monitor, it appears to get no signal. But
waiting for a few seconds will bring the installer back. If I just
boot the machine, again, the monitor appears to get no signal, but
nothing I do will bring text mode back. I can't Control-Alt-Backspace
to end KDE and go back to the command prompt. So it confuses me. :)

I'll take a look at the HOWTO. Thanks.

Quote:

>> I went so far as to attempt to install Red Hat with the computer

>Why? If you have a problem, solve it! Don't do somethinbg else.

Well, I was using Red Hat in the first place. I re-installed with it
docked to attempt to setup the monitor with the Red Hat installation
tools, which didn't work out. I guess my apporach is to do the same
thing over and over again till works. :)
 
 
 

X works fine in laptop mode, won't load in docked mode.

Post by Peter T. Breue » Mon, 01 Apr 2002 04:02:54



> On Sat, 30 Mar 2002 15:27:53 +0100, "Peter T. Breuer"


>>> The problem is when I dock the laptop. Kudzu detects the network
>>> interface built into the dock, and detects the USB mouse plugged into

>>Well, there's nothing wrong with that, is there? If you don't like it,
>>get rid of kudzu (I would, if I were you!) or beat it senseless.
> Well, that wasn't the problem. The problem was the whole monitor
> thing. kudzu finding my mouse and NIC was good... Not being able to

I don't understand you. There's nothing to find - you KNOW what your
nic and mouse are. You bought them, and you stuffed them in the slots,
or you read the output from SuperProbe, or you noticed that it's a PS/2
mouse.

And even if you didn't know (eyes closed?), you only need to find out
once, and after that you can throw away whatever it was that found out
for you. They won't change.

Quote:> set up the monitor was not.

Throw it away (kudzu). What good does it do you?

Quote:>>But is it? Be specific. The indication is that you want to use a
>>differnet  "ModeLine" for your monitor than for your laptop screen.
>>That's fine, and to be expected. So write yourself one and use it. See
>>the XF86 Video Timings HOWTO.
> I'm not sure if it is or not... When I'm in the Red Hat installer

I am sure. The fact that you are not is your problem!

Quote:> I'll take a look at the HOWTO. Thanks.

Please.

Quote:> docked to attempt to setup the monitor with the Red Hat installation
> tools, which didn't work out. I guess my apporach is to do the same
> thing over and over again till works. :)

There is no reason in any universe to think that repeating a task will
give a different result.  It's called "knocking your head against a
brick wall".  The wall won't go away.  You have to open your eyes, see
that there is a brick wall ahead of you, and walk around it.

It is "normal" to configure X to expect two mice - a ps/2 mouse and an
USB mouse. Look at linux-usb.org for details. It doesn't matter of one
of them is not there sometimes.

It is similarly normal to have two different X configurations, one for
an external monitor, and one for your LCD screen, But you should also
beaware thatyou have to _switch_ to an external monitor. That is
usually an Fn key, but toshibas also permit control via their
proprietary sci/hci interface, for which you need the "toshutils" in
linux.

Peter

 
 
 

1. how do 'plug-ins' work?

I've got a little project I'm working on that could benifit from being able to
drop in third-party extensions as plug-ins.  I understand the plug-in theory,
more or less, but I'm fuzzy on the implementation details.  I was hoping someone
could help me out a bit.

As I understand it (and please correct me if I'm wrong), if I create a function
library and compile it as a static object then I have to compile the final app
along with that object.  If I make my library a shared object than I just have to
link against it at compile time and it's included at run-time (I've never made
any of my own so's - do you have to do anything different than what you'd do for
a static object?).

But what if I want to create a library that I can just drop into an app without
having to recompile against it (such as a netscape-style plug-in)?  Obviously
there has to be some agreed-upon api so the app knows what entry points exist in
the library and the library knows what functions the app exposes, but how does
the app actually 'load' the library while it's running?

I noticed some functions for loading dynamic modules in a glib reference and this
seems like it would be a place to start, but once I've loaded the module is there
anything special I have to do to call it's functions or do they just magically
become available?  This is the part where I'm getting lost...

If anyone can point me to a good online resource for this or drop me a basic
explanation, I'd be grateful.  I've looked over netscape's plug-in docs but that
mostly concentrates on the api side of things.  I spent some time digging through
the gimp source but gimp plug-ins appear to run as a separate process which isn't
really the behavior I'm after (I could probably still do what I want that way,
but I need to get a handle on this whole library thing anyway ;).

thanks in advance,

e
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