Starting X automatically

Starting X automatically

Post by Jamie Dahlu » Sat, 11 Jan 1997 04:00:00



Can anyone tell me how to make X start as soon as I boot Linux.   I
would like for it to go into X instead of prompt. Thanks to all!

                                                Jamie

 
 
 

Starting X automatically

Post by Joe Peters » Sun, 12 Jan 1997 04:00:00


On Fri, 10 Jan 1997 15:26:22 -0500, Jamie Dahlum

Quote:>Can anyone tell me how to make X start as soon as I boot Linux.   I
>would like for it to go into X instead of prompt. Thanks to all!

Assuming that X is working for you (e.g., you can do a successful
'startx' ), go into /etc/inittab and change the default runlevel.  For
a Slackware 96 distribution w/ kernel v2.0.0, that'd be '6'; of
course, YMMV).

For example, change
        id:3:initdefault
to
        id:6:initdefault

After making a backup copy of /etc/inittab, of course.

After all other booting has finished, the XDM ("X Display Manager")
will be started.  The first thing you should see is a login dialog.
Login as root, or your personal userid, as needed.  To logout, do a
<ctrl><alt><bksp>.  Instead of exiting X, you'll be dropped back to
the login dialog (as one would expect).

At least, this is how it's working for me. <g>
```
Joe

 
 
 

Starting X automatically

Post by Eric Gaten » Tue, 14 Jan 1997 04:00:00





> >Can anyone tell me how to make X start as soon as I boot Linux.   I
> >would like for it to go into X instead of prompt. Thanks to all!

> >                                               Jamie

> Put 'startx' in your .login, and then 'logout' if you want to go straight
> out.

> ---

> *****These are my own views, I represent nobody (Well maybe myself)*****
> ***********I guarantee nothing - Particularly the spelling**************

--
--


 
 
 

Starting X automatically

Post by Mr D P Rou » Tue, 14 Jan 1997 04:00:00



Quote:>Can anyone tell me how to make X start as soon as I boot Linux.   I
>would like for it to go into X instead of prompt. Thanks to all!

>                                            Jamie

Put 'startx' in your .login, and then 'logout' if you want to go straight
out.

---

*****These are my own views, I represent nobody (Well maybe myself)*****
***********I guarantee nothing - Particularly the spelling**************

 
 
 

Starting X automatically

Post by Matthew Haycraf » Tue, 14 Jan 1997 04:00:00



> Can anyone tell me how to make X start as soon as I boot Linux.   I
> would like for it to go into X instead of prompt. Thanks to all!

yes modify
'/etc/inittab'
change the '3' to a '4'
here:

Quote:> # Default runlevel.

id:3:initdefault:

run level 4 uses xdm for logins ( a x-based graphical login)
and as long as X starts..
you usually have an emergency text login on virtual terminal 6
but you'll need to press Ctrl-Alt-F6
c1:1235:respawn:/sbin/agetty 38400 tty1 linux
c2:1235:respawn:/sbin/agetty 38400 tty2 linux
c3:1235:respawn:/sbin/agetty 38400 tty3 linux
c4:1235:respawn:/sbin/agetty 38400 tty4 linux
c5:1235:respawn:/sbin/agetty 38400 tty5 linux
c6:12345:respawn:/sbin/agetty 38400 tty6 linux
as you can see above.. (same file /etc/inittab)
console 6 has the '4' yet the others don't...

Quote:>                                                 Jamie

--
Matthew W. Haycraft (Matthew="Gift of Jehovah" Haycraft="A hedged
Enclosure"?!)

County
http://umbc.edu/~mhaycr1                      

 
 
 

Starting X automatically

Post by Alberto Calleri » Wed, 15 Jan 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

> Put 'startx' in your .login, and then 'logout' if you want to go straight
> out.

Here follows my .login that preserve running startx if
you ain't on the console.

                        Bye

if if ( `tty` == "/dev/tty1" ) then

        if ( $TERM == "con80x25" || $TERM == "linux" ) then

                echo ""
                echo -n "Starting X-Windows in 2 seconds (type Control-C
to interrupt)"
                sleep 2
                echo ""
                /usr/bin/X11/startx
                clear           # get rid of annoying cursor rectangle
                logout          # logout after leaving windows system
        endif

endif

 
 
 

Starting X automatically

Post by Gereon Stei » Sat, 18 Jan 1997 04:00:00



> On Fri, 10 Jan 1997 15:26:22 -0500, Jamie Dahlum

> >Can anyone tell me how to make X start as soon as I boot Linux.   I
> >would like for it to go into X instead of prompt. Thanks to all!

> Assuming that X is working for you (e.g., you can do a successful
> 'startx' ), go into /etc/inittab and change the default runlevel.  For
> a Slackware 96 distribution w/ kernel v2.0.0, that'd be '6'; of
> course, YMMV).

> For example, change
>         id:3:initdefault
> to
>         id:6:initdefault

> After making a backup copy of /etc/inittab, of course.

> After all other booting has finished, the XDM ("X Display Manager")
> will be started.  The first thing you should see is a login dialog.
> Login as root, or your personal userid, as needed.  To logout, do a
> <ctrl><alt><bksp>.  Instead of exiting X, you'll be dropped back to
> the login dialog (as one would expect).

> At least, this is how it's working for me. <g>
> ```
> Joe

You gotta be careful about this, however!!!

With at least SOME versions of Slackware, rc.6 is the shutdown-script,
which causes the system to shut down when entering runlevel 6. This
would (and in my case did, when I tried this some time in the past)
result in the system constantly rebooting. Big deal.

So I'd prefer to set xdm's inittab-entry to runlevel 5 to have xdm
come up with the default runlevel of 5 that common slackware systems
enter on bootup. At least put xdm on ANY runlevel BUT 6!

Jerry

--
========================================================================
 Gereon 'Jerry' Stein  | net:    http://www.vebacom.de/

 Software-Entwicklung  | phone:  private: (+49)(0)2041 988-630 fax: -631
   Bochum, Germany     |         office:  (+49)(0)234 9709-309 fax: -111
========================================================================
Life has got a nice melody...  but lyrics leave something to be desired.
========================================================================

 
 
 

Starting X automatically

Post by Ken Adam » Mon, 20 Jan 1997 04:00:00



: Put 'startx' in your .login, and then 'logout' if you want to go straight
: out.

I tried this too. BUT it doesn't seem to work

Where do I have to put the .login file?

TTFN

Rgds Ken

--
 Ken Adams, Cowplain Portsmouth England IO90LV - Telephone +44 (0)1705 615424


 
 
 

Starting X automatically

Post by jpac » Mon, 20 Jan 1997 04:00:00




> : Put 'startx' in your .login, and then 'logout' if you want to go straight
> : out.

> I tried this too. BUT it doesn't seem to work

> Where do I have to put the .login file?

It should be in your user home directory.  However, your problem may
also
be that different shells read different files on login/logout/start a
new
shell.

I believe that .login is for csh and tcsh.  If you are using bash then
you could put startx in your .bash_profile file in your home directory.

Alternatively you can change the default runlevel in /etc/inittab so
that xdm will run.  This will provide you with a graphical login
screen, and automatically run X for you once you do login.

For more info try: man bash, man csh, man xdm.

> TTFN

> Rgds Ken

> --
>  Ken Adams, Cowplain Portsmouth England IO90LV - Telephone +44 (0)1705 615424



 
 
 

Starting X automatically

Post by Roberto Pava » Sat, 25 Jan 1997 04:00:00




> : Put 'startx' in your .login, and then 'logout' if you want to go straight
> : out.

> I tried this too. BUT it doesn't seem to work

> Where do I have to put the .login file?

I think there is a better way to do it.  If you want to login in an xterm
ie. like on a grpahics workstation at school/work, you set the runlevel to
5, I think, instead of 3.  Maybe it's the other way around.  If you're
running Red Hat, this stuff is in the manual.  There were a couple of
previous postings that better described how to do it.

.login is the login script for csh/tcsh.  It usually conatins
user-specific tasks to be performed on startup, like setting aliases,
paths, etc.  If you're using the bash shell, the file is called .bashrc.
It's probably not a good idea to put startx in a file like this, but
that's just my gut feeling.  I'm only a 6 month newbie anyway.

Your faithful narrator,
Roberto Pavan

I'm not supposed to be like this - but it's OK.
                "The Wrong Child" - R.E.M.

 
 
 

Starting X automatically

Post by Juraj Bedna » Fri, 28 Mar 1997 04:00:00



> : Put 'startx' in your .login, and then 'logout' if you want to go straight
> : out.

> I tried this too. BUT it doesn't seem to work

> Where do I have to put the .login file?

Put it in your home directory (write cd ~/ first). But it seems you have
bash,
or another shell. So try to write it also to .profile. Oh - and you need
to write 'startx &' and then 'logout' (just to put the xstater to
background)

         Bye bye
                  Juraj DarKie Bednar

 
 
 

Starting X automatically

Post by ... » Fri, 28 Mar 1997 04:00:00




> > : Put 'startx' in your .login, and then 'logout' if you want to go straight
> > : out.

> > I tried this too. BUT it doesn't seem to work

>          Bye bye
>                   Juraj DarKie Bednar

  What I would like to do is start up X when the system comes up into
  init level 3 rather than when someone logs in. Is there some slick
  correct "standard" way for this to be accomplished?

  Thanks for any help.

  Bob.

 
 
 

Starting X automatically

Post by Wilhelm Fitzpatric » Fri, 28 Mar 1997 04:00:00


Quote:>   What I would like to do is start up X when the system comes up into
>   init level 3 rather than when someone logs in. Is there some slick
>   correct "standard" way for this to be accomplished?

xdm
 
 
 

Starting X automatically

Post by Victor Zh » Sun, 30 Mar 1997 04:00:00


Newsgroups: comp.os.linux.x
Subject: Re: Starting X automatically
Summary:
Expires:

Sender:
Followup-To:
Distribution:
Organization: Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
Keywords:
Cc:
Bob,

There's more than one way to do it.

I have used Slackware and RedHat. They both have a runlevel for X11. Under
RedHat it's runlevel 5.

You can type "linux 5" at the lilo prompt(depends on how you name your
linux partition), or you can edit the /etc/inittab file and change the
line
id:3:initdefault
to
id:5:initdefault

Of course you can put xdm in you rc file. You will be able to edit your
rc file via control-panel.

Hope that helps.

Victor




>> > : Put 'startx' in your .login, and then 'logout' if you want to go straight
>> > : out.

>> > I tried this too. BUT it doesn't seem to work

>>          Bye bye
>>                   Juraj DarKie Bednar

>  What I would like to do is start up X when the system comes up into
>  init level 3 rather than when someone logs in. Is there some slick
>  correct "standard" way for this to be accomplished?

>  Thanks for any help.

>  Bob.