what resources are recommended for running X-win32?

what resources are recommended for running X-win32?

Post by Zed Strang » Wed, 20 Mar 2002 00:36:29



I have been experimenting with running X-win32 to access the KDE
desktop on my Linux box,,  and i am wondering which would be the best
way  to allocate the power (ie ram and cpu) to each machine.

ie my Pcs cpu/ram are
Windows -       550mhz/394
Linux           350mhz/128      

Thinking about how this all works - i gather that all the hard work is
done by the Windows pc  as the applications are being run in the
Windows memory - not from the Linux box.

Therefore the Linux box could run on the bare minimum requirement for
cpu and where possible increase Ram or CPU on the Windows box as
upgradingthe Linux box would have 0 affect on performance.(eg like
adding another 128mb ram etc)

Is this assumption correct or have I*ed it all up again?

 
 
 

what resources are recommended for running X-win32?

Post by Steve Marti » Wed, 20 Mar 2002 11:02:14



> Thinking about how this all works - i gather that all the hard work is
> done by the Windows pc  as the applications are being run in the
> Windows memory - not from the Linux box.

Your message is a little unclear; do you want the user interaction
(i.e. display, mouse, keyboard) to be on the Windows box or the
Linux box?

In either case, here's how X works... an application is running on
a box, doing its data crunching or whatever, and the input / output
functions come from a machine (frequently but not necessarily the
same machine) that is running an "X server". The X server takes care
of interacting with the user through display and input hardware and
"serves" the user-interaction needs of the running application (thus the
unfortunately overloaded meaning of the word "server").

If you want to run your X apps on the Linux box, then you'll need an
X server for your Windows machine in order to interact with it. If,
on the other hand, you're running X apps on your Windows machine (and
I'm not really familiar with any environment for Windows that allows
this to happen), then you'll need to configure XFree86 or some other
X server on your Linux box.

 
 
 

what resources are recommended for running X-win32?

Post by Wayne Thro » Wed, 20 Mar 2002 12:35:41



: If you want to run your X apps on the Linux box, then you'll need an X
: server for your Windows machine in order to interact with it.  If, on
: the other hand, you're running X apps on your Windows machine (and I'm
: not really familiar with any environment for Windows that allows this
: to happen),

    http://www.cygwin.com/xfree/

    Cygwin/XFree86 consists of an X Server, Xlib, and nearly all of the
    standard X clients, such as xterm, xhost, xdpyinfo, xclock, and
    xeyes.  Cygwin/XFree86, as the name implies, uses the Cygwin project
    which provides a UNIX-like API to Xlib and X clients, thereby
    minimizing the amount of porting required.

So, it can deal with things either way: running clients on windows
and server on linux, or vice-versa.  You will also want to look
at VNC.

    http://www.uk.research.att.com/vnc/


 
 
 

what resources are recommended for running X-win32?

Post by Zed Strang » Fri, 22 Mar 2002 15:37:50


On Mon, 18 Mar 2002 21:02:14 -0500, Steve Martin



>> Thinking about how this all works - i gather that all the hard work is
>> done by the Windows pc  as the applications are being run in the
>> Windows memory - not from the Linux box.

>Your message is a little unclear; do you want the user interaction
>(i.e. display, mouse, keyboard) to be on the Windows box or the
>Linux box?

Windows box

Its not a form of remote control - like VNC or PC anywhere.  So
several users can connect to the Linux box at the same time and each
one is running their own indiviudual desktop.

Quote:

>In either case, here's how X works... an application is running on
>a box, doing its data crunching or whatever, and the input / output
>functions come from a machine (frequently but not necessarily the
>same machine) that is running an "X server". The X server takes care
>of interacting with the user through display and input hardware and
>"serves" the user-interaction needs of the running application (thus the
>unfortunately overloaded meaning of the word "server").

>If you want to run your X apps on the Linux box, then you'll need an
>X server for your Windows machine in order to interact with it. If,
>on the other hand, you're running X apps on your Windows machine (and
>I'm not really familiar with any environment for Windows that allows
>this to happen), then you'll need to configure XFree86 or some other
>X server on your Linux box.

The application is called X-Win32  www.starnet.com
its an X server that will run all of the Linux applications in a KDE
(or whatever)  desktop  but on your windows PC.  theres some great
screen shots of it at their website and also a helpful article at
http://www.apcmag.com/apc/apcmag.nsf/1_alldocs/C508A1D704C0A4FACA256B...
(link will probably wrap)

Xfree86 is running on the Linux box (and it has to for it to work) but
it doesnt need to have a GUI open at the time

I have this all working fine on my home network i am just trying to
work out which machine is doing the most work. by visually guaging
performance its hard to tell.

it appears to me that this concept works just like running an
application off a network drive.    ie the X server on the Windows Box
is running the applications in its own memory and thus the Linux box
does not need a great deal of resources. except for perhaps a fast
hard drive.

NB  where i have used the word Server -  i may mean client, sorry.

 
 
 

1. help with running X-win32 with RedHat 7.0

Hi Everyone,
I am having problem with running X-win32 on Microsoft Windows
connecting to my RedHat Linux 7.0 kernel version 2.4.  I also have
another RedHat 6.1 machine with kernel 2.2.18 and I do NOT have
problem connecting to this RedHat 6.1 machine using X-win32.  
First, let me describe the steps that I use to connect to the RedHat
6.1 box:

1) On the Linux box, I edit the file /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/xdm/Xaccess
           file by putting in the IP address of the Microsoft windows
           machine the will use X-win32 to connect to the linux box to run
           X,
2)Start xdm in the linux using root account and xdm starts with
         With a nice GUI,

3)On the Microsoft windows machine, I set X-config to connect
          to the linux box using XDMP,

4)Start X-win32 and everything works like a charm.

On the RedHat 7.0 box, I perform the same step that I did with the
RedHat 6.1 box.   I also perform the same procedure with X-config
on Microsoft windows machine with the exception of changing the
IP address for XDMP because both Linux boxes have different IP
addresses. This time X-win32 does not work with RedHat 7.0 box.
I notice that the xdm GUI interface for RedHat 7.0 is different.  It
comes with the Xfree86 Project banner.  Anyone has run into similar
situations, please help me with this one.  I would like to install
RedHat 7.0 so that I can compile kernel 2.4 with it.  It seems that I would
have to upgrade a few things (modutils module comes to mind) before I
can compile kernel 2.4 for RedHat 6.1.  I would rather install RH7.0 and
then compile kernel 2.4; however, I need to have this issue resolved.

Many thanks.
David

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