what CPUs for this mobo?

what CPUs for this mobo?

Post by Bob Berma » Sun, 08 Oct 2000 04:00:00



I have a spare PC and the motherboard manual for it says that it
acccepts Pentium P54C/P55C MMX CPUs, AMD K6 CPUs, Cyrix/IBM 6x86L/6x86MX
(M2) CPUs.

External clock speed is 50,55,60,66,75,83 MHz.

The socket is Socket 7 - 321 pin.

I realize this motherboard is very old, but will Pentium IIs or K6-2
CPUs work in this? I can't find plain Pentium CPUs on the market anymore
and PIIs are pretty cheap. The CPU right now is a Pentium 90 that I'd
like to replace with something a little beefier, but for not too much
money (~ $50 or so).

The motherboard is a Eurone 5571A.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

 
 
 

what CPUs for this mobo?

Post by emc.. » Sun, 08 Oct 2000 04:00:00



> The socket is Socket 7 - 321 pin.
> I realize this motherboard is very old, but will Pentium IIs or K6-2
> CPUs work in this?

The P2 and P3 both use Slot 1.  Celerons use Socket 370.  Slot 1 and S370
CPUs can be adapted to the other form factor, but not to S7.

AMD chips still around - I think the K6-2's - use S7.

[...]

Quote:> Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Invest the $20 or $30 for a P2/P3 motherboard.  If you eventually
decide to go from a P2-266 or whatever and up to a P3-700, just change
the jumper from a 66MHz FSB to a 100MHz FSB.

--


 
 
 

what CPUs for this mobo?

Post by David_ » Sun, 08 Oct 2000 04:00:00



> I have a spare PC and the motherboard manual for it says that it
> acccepts Pentium P54C/P55C MMX CPUs, AMD K6 CPUs, Cyrix/IBM
> 6x86L/6x86MX (M2) CPUs.

> External clock speed is 50,55,60,66,75,83 MHz.

> The socket is Socket 7 - 321 pin.

Socket 7 boards are still rather popular, and there are several CPUs you
can plug into them.  Unfortunately, this one doesn't support 100MHz, so
the fastest Socket-7 processors won't work at their full speed.

Quote:> I realize this motherboard is very old, but will Pentium IIs or K6-2
> CPUs work in this?

Pentium II will not work.  PII, PIII and Celerons use completely
different physical interfaces.  Either Slot-1 or Socket-370.  There's no
way you can make this work on a Socket-7 board.

The K6-2 and K6-3 will work.  These are Socket-7 chips.  But the faster
models will require a 100MHz bus to run at full speed.  Still, there are
models that are meant for a 66MHz clock - which you can support.

You should be able to run a 100MHz chip at 66MHz, but the resulting
speed will be slower than the rating.  For example, a 500MHz chip is
meant for a 100MHz bus with a 5x multiplier - if you put it on a 66MHz
bus, you'll get 333MHz.  If you can still find a chip seller that sells
a K6-2 that's designed for a 66Mhz bus (I think the last ones made at
this speed were the 333MHz models), you should get one of those and save
yourself some money.

You can also try using a 100MHz chip at the 75MHz or 83MHz speed.  If
you do, however, be careful that you don't end up overclocking your PCI
slots.  The PCI slots must run at 33MHz or slower.  Your board may have
special jumpers to allow this.  If it doesn't, then don't try setting
the clock speed to anything faster than 66MHz.

(Note that your BIOS may not recognize an AMD K6-2 or K6-3 chip.  It
should still work, but it end up identifying it as something else.  You
may be unable to enable/disable some chip-specific features.  It might
result in an unstable system, but I think that should be unlikely.)

Of course, everything becomes easier if you decide you want to just
replace the motherboard.  Motherboards aren't terribly expensive.  You
should be able to get a Super-7 (Socket-7 at 100MHz) board with full
K6-2 and K6-3 support for pretty cheap.  Socket-370 boards (for
Celerons) are also pretty inexpensive.

Even a high-end board for a PIII or an AMD Athlon aren't very expensive
compared to the cost of the CPU.  (Not counting server-oriented boards
with built-in SCSI, Ethernet and multiple processor sockets.  They can
cost more than the price of a processor.)

-- David

 
 
 

what CPUs for this mobo?

Post by David_ » Sun, 08 Oct 2000 04:00:00



> You can probably put in an Intel Pentium 200MMX or 233MMX chip.  You
> cannot put in a Pentium II.  What multipliers are on the board?  What
> voltage levels?  That will determine if you can use an AMD K6-2.

Voltage levels are important (thanks for reminding me.  I forgot to
mention it on my other post).

Multipliers are not.  Socket-7 simply has three pins on the socket wired
to three jumpers.  The multipliers associated with different jumper
settings will depend on the chip in the socket, not with the
motherboard.

-- David

 
 
 

what CPUs for this mobo?

Post by William Fon » Mon, 09 Oct 2000 12:16:29


You can probably put in an Intel Pentium 200MMX or 233MMX chip.  You cannot
put in a Pentium II.  What multipliers are on the board?  What voltage
levels?  That will determine if you can use an AMD K6-2.

-will

--

______________________________
William Fong - www.digitaldev.com


Quote:> I have a spare PC and the motherboard manual for it says that it
> acccepts Pentium P54C/P55C MMX CPUs, AMD K6 CPUs, Cyrix/IBM 6x86L/6x86MX
> (M2) CPUs.

> External clock speed is 50,55,60,66,75,83 MHz.

> The socket is Socket 7 - 321 pin.

> I realize this motherboard is very old, but will Pentium IIs or K6-2
> CPUs work in this? I can't find plain Pentium CPUs on the market anymore
> and PIIs are pretty cheap. The CPU right now is a Pentium 90 that I'd
> like to replace with something a little beefier, but for not too much
> money (~ $50 or so).

> The motherboard is a Eurone 5571A.

> Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

 
 
 

what CPUs for this mobo?

Post by Ross Sieb » Wed, 11 Oct 2000 04:00:00




>You should be able to run a 100MHz chip at 66MHz, but the resulting
>speed will be slower than the rating.  For example, a 500MHz chip is
>meant for a 100MHz bus with a 5x multiplier - if you put it on a 66MHz
>bus, you'll get 333MHz.  If you can still find a chip seller that sells
>a K6-2 that's designed for a 66Mhz bus (I think the last ones made at
>this speed were the 333MHz models), you should get one of those and save
>yourself some money.

A K6-2 400 mhz can be run almost at full speed, sometimes.
Set the multiplier to 2, and the CPU will interpret this as 6.
6 * 66 = 396.

YMMV.

 
 
 

what CPUs for this mobo?

Post by hac » Thu, 12 Oct 2000 13:37:46





> >You should be able to run a 100MHz chip at 66MHz, but the resulting
> >speed will be slower than the rating.  For example, a 500MHz chip is
> >meant for a 100MHz bus with a 5x multiplier - if you put it on a 66MHz
> >bus, you'll get 333MHz.  If you can still find a chip seller that sells
> >a K6-2 that's designed for a 66Mhz bus (I think the last ones made at
> >this speed were the 333MHz models), you should get one of those and save
> >yourself some money.

> A K6-2 400 mhz can be run almost at full speed, sometimes.
> Set the multiplier to 2, and the CPU will interpret this as 6.
> 6 * 66 = 396.

My old ASUS P55T2P4 is running with a K6-2/400 just fine.  You can get
non-standard voltages by using multiple jumpers for the reference
voltage divider string.  ASUS has a beta BIOS that recognizes the
K6-2/400.  Since I already had the motherboard and memory, the $42 for
the processor was a reasonable upgrade.

The real kicker is memory.  If you need to buy memory, forget about
any motherboard that uses 30 or 72 pin SIMM's.  You'll save enough
buying SDRAM DIMM's to pay for a new motherboard, and possibly the
processor, too.  Many older Pentium motherboards only cache 64MB of
RAM, which may also be of concern.

--

 
 
 

what CPUs for this mobo?

Post by David_ » Thu, 12 Oct 2000 14:04:00



> A K6-2 400 mhz can be run almost at full speed, sometimes.  Set the
> multiplier to 2, and the CPU will interpret this as 6.  6 * 66 = 396.

Does AMD allow this?  Or do they limit the multipliers to what's printed
on the chip's package, like Intel does?

I know they do something like this for Athlon/Duron processors.  I don't
know about the K6-2 series.

-- David

 
 
 

what CPUs for this mobo?

Post by John » Thu, 12 Oct 2000 04:00:00




>> The socket is Socket 7 - 321 pin.
>> I realize this motherboard is very old, but will Pentium IIs or K6-2
>> CPUs work in this?
> The P2 and P3 both use Slot 1.  Celerons use Socket 370.  Slot 1 and S370
> CPUs can be adapted to the other form factor, but not to S7.
> AMD chips still around - I think the K6-2's - use S7.

I'm running an AMD K6-II/500 in a super socket 7 M/b. I'm sure it could be made to run
slower, but you DO need to watch the voltage.

AMD has a web page devoted to compatible M/boards.

Quote:> [...]
>> Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
> Invest the $20 or $30 for a P2/P3 motherboard.  If you eventually
> decide to go from a P2-266 or whatever and up to a P3-700, just change
> the jumper from a 66MHz FSB to a 100MHz FSB.

Sure
Ever tried putting an ATX M/b in an AT case?

--

 
 
 

what CPUs for this mobo?

Post by John » Thu, 12 Oct 2000 04:00:00



> Of course, everything becomes easier if you decide you want to just
> replace the motherboard.  Motherboards aren't terribly expensive.  You
> should be able to get a Super-7 (Socket-7 at 100MHz) board with full
> K6-2 and K6-3 support for pretty cheap.  Socket-370 boards (for
> Celerons) are also pretty inexpensive.

A problem with replacing the M/b is that he will also need new RAM; finding a
new M/b that taks FPM or EDO RAM may not be easy.

Mind you, am AMD k6-II 500 + ASUS P5S-B and 128 Mbytes of RAM and the box will
be transformed almost beyond belief.

--

 
 
 

what CPUs for this mobo?

Post by John » Thu, 12 Oct 2000 04:00:00



> My old ASUS P55T2P4 is running with a K6-2/400 just fine.  You can get
> non-standard voltages by using multiple jumpers for the reference
> voltage divider string.  ASUS has a beta BIOS that recognizes the
> K6-2/400.  Since I already had the motherboard and memory, the $42 for
> the processor was a reasonable upgrade.

Toms Hardware has an article about making that board go faster. I read through it, wishing
it applied to one I have.

--

 
 
 

what CPUs for this mobo?

Post by emc.. » Thu, 12 Oct 2000 04:00:00



> > Invest the $20 or $30 for a P2/P3 motherboard.  If you eventually
> > decide to go from a P2-266 or whatever and up to a P3-700, just change
> > the jumper from a 66MHz FSB to a 100MHz FSB.
> Sure
> Ever tried putting an ATX M/b in an AT case?

Oh.  Good point.

Of course, a 300W ATX P/S isn't going to be more than $50.

--

 
 
 

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