Perhaps i found the solution

Perhaps i found the solution

Post by Georg Hosoy » Mon, 15 Nov 1999 04:00:00



Hi there!
Did some recherche in the net, and perhaps i found the solution of my
problem.
I could install Linux from my DOS Partition and then try to re-compile the
Linux-Kernel after i have modified the rc.modules file with

        /sbin/modprobe/ sscd000 sscd000= 0x1fO, 14 // if slave

or

        /sbin/modprobe/ sscd000 sscd000= 0xif0, 15 // if master

But there are a few questions left.
Is the Syntax right?

/sbin/modprobe/ <name of drive> <name of drive>= <E/A - Adress>, <IRQ>?

and

What is IRQ?

Another problem: i never used Linux before and dont know how to recomplile
a kernel.
(*weird laughter*)

Hope someone can help!

Bye!

Georg

 
 
 

Perhaps i found the solution

Post by Peter T. Breue » Mon, 15 Nov 1999 04:00:00


: problem.
: I could install Linux from my DOS Partition and then try to re-compile the
: Linux-Kernel after i have modified the rc.modules file with

:       /sbin/modprobe/ sscd000 sscd000= 0x1fO, 14 // if slave

:       /sbin/modprobe/ sscd000 sscd000= 0xif0, 15 // if master

: But there are a few questions left.
: Is the Syntax right?

No. You have spaces where there should be none and you are loading the
same module twice! Where do you get this idea from. And what is
"sscd000"? I have never heard of any such driver!

: /sbin/modprobe/ <name of drive> <name of drive>= <E/A - Adress>, <IRQ>?

: What is IRQ?

interrupt.

: Another problem: i never used Linux before and dont know how to recomplile
: a kernel.
: (*weird laughter*)

So read the kernel howto. Look in /usr/doc/faq/howtos, or nearby.

: Hope someone can help!

Go read the modules howto.

What are you trying to do? To me, it looks like you are trying to load
the scsi cd driver, scd.o?

Peter

 
 
 

1. find vs. $FIND, perhaps subshell problem

I have the following script:

#!/usr/bin/ksh
REGEXP=$1
FILE=$2
FIND_C="find . -follow -name '*.c' -exec egrep -i '$REGEXP' /dev/null {} \;"
#Works
find . -follow -name '*.c' -exec egrep -i "$REGEXP" /dev/null {} \; > $FILE
# Does not work
$FIND_C > $FILE
#Works
eval $FIND_C ">" $FILE

Okay, now if I take the file redirection out, the results above still hold:
find ...     #works -->regexp found
$FIND_C      #fails -->quietly works, but with no results
eval $FIND_C #works -->regexp found

Assuming that I'm not doing anything stupid 8)... why does the second
one fail?

I'm wondering if there is some subtle interaction going on between
subshells, or maybe in the second one, the shell doesn't interpret
$FIND_C twice like it would in eval?

that is in the eval line, the current shell interprets $FIND_C, then
eval interprets the interpretation in a subshell.  Is that right?

thanks again.

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