old hardware and linux compatibility - help

old hardware and linux compatibility - help

Post by Kenneth McDowel » Mon, 21 Jul 1997 04:00:00



I have only recently learned a little about linux, and am considering
installing it on a crummy old pc that is running (very unstably) Win3.1.

Despite the claims that Linux was designed to run in small memory and HD
footprint, most of the posts I see seem to be about installing on 16+MB 500+HD
Pentium machines.

The machine I want to install it on is:
Intel 486 DX-25
174 MB IDE HD
4 MB RAM
Video 7 SVGA card
aftermarket SCSI adaptor
and a cheap-assed aftermarket CD

I believe that the motherboard does not have room for any more RAM (though I
haven't looked at it recently) and I'm not too sure about the reliability of
the CD.

I would like to be able to run X windows, and some simple word processing and
net apps and maybe a web server and gcc if we are anywhere in the ballpark
with required HD space. I am not above adding external SCSI-HD and memory (if possible).

As I said, I might be stuck with the 4MB RAM, though. Am I SOL with X-Windows
if so? And anybody have issues with circa '92 Video 7 SVGA or VGA cards? What
is a reasonable amount of HD space for the applications I've mentioned?

Thanks, K.
--
__________________________________________________________________
Kenneth McDowell
Radii

www.radii.com

 
 
 

old hardware and linux compatibility - help

Post by John Winte » Mon, 21 Jul 1997 04:00:00




Quote:>I have only recently learned a little about linux, and am considering
>installing it on a crummy old pc that is running (very unstably) Win3.1.

>Despite the claims that Linux was designed to run in small memory and HD
>footprint, most of the posts I see seem to be about installing on 16+MB 500+HD
>Pentium machines.

>The machine I want to install it on is:
>Intel 486 DX-25
>174 MB IDE HD
>4 MB RAM
>Video 7 SVGA card
>aftermarket SCSI adaptor
>and a cheap-assed aftermarket CD

>I believe that the motherboard does not have room for any more RAM (though I
>haven't looked at it recently) and I'm not too sure about the reliability of
>the CD.

This isn't so crummy (apart possibly from the RAM) and it's certainly
capable of running Linux.  The problem you might have is that many
installations have now moved to modular kernels with every bell and
whistle potentially available and a RAM disk used during the installation.
You might have difficulty getting one of these to boot, due to the lack
of RAM.

I recently installed Linux on a 386sx-16 with 3 meg of RAM.  To do it
I used another Linux machine to generate a custom kernel containing only
what I wanted.  Then I booted with my kernel, set up some swap space
and continued with the installation.

What you're trying to do is perfectly feasible, but you're not going to
be able to do it with the new user-friendly hand-holding installation
programs.  Can you find an experienced Linux person nearby who would be
willing to spend 2 or 3 hours helping you get it going?

Quote:>I would like to be able to run X windows, and some simple word processing and
>net apps and maybe a web server and gcc if we are anywhere in the ballpark
>with required HD space. I am not above adding external SCSI-HD and memory
>(if possible).

Now this might be pushing it - particularly X.  Have you considered putting
a new motherboard in the case?  They seem to be almost free these days.

John

--
John Winters.  Wallingford, Oxon, England.

 
 
 

old hardware and linux compatibility - help

Post by Yitzhac Casa » Fri, 25 Jul 1997 04:00:00


: Despite the claims that Linux was designed to run in small memory and HD
: footprint, most of the posts I see seem to be about installing on 16+MB 500+HD
: Pentium machines.

Linux will optimally utilize almost any machine, be it a multiprocessor
Pentium Pro server, a RISC machine or a 386SX.

: The machine I want to install it on is:
: Intel 486 DX-25
That's fine
: 174 MB IDE HD

Should suffice, if you don't install too much junk.
: 4 MB RAM
That's enough for text mode or for MGR (a windowing system you can use
instead of X),but very tight for X. Note that unlike Windows or OS/2,
Linux is quite functional in text mode. 4MB RAM isn't very much for gcc
though. You may want to remove the -pipe gcc flag from Makefiles for
optimal performance on such low memory. Note that 8MB RAM were enough for
me to run Netscape on a 486DX2-50, so you should add memory if you can.
Also, most distributions require more RAM, but some will allow you to
manually enable swap-space before the main part of the installations
(Slackware will, but not RedHat)

: and a cheap-assed aftermarket CD
Linux should support any SCSI or EIDE DC-ROM, as well as most CD-ROMs
using propietary interfaces. You should figure out the details of your
hardware, and take a lok at the Hardware HOWTO.

--
Yours
    Yitzhac Casapu
       Phone/FaxModem: 972-4-8334527
       41/12 Beth-Lehem St. Haifa, Israel; ZIP: 35567
    Studying at the Technion - Israel institute of technology.
       Faculty of Electrical Engineering

When I shop for hardware I always look for the "Designed for Windows 95" logo.
I really thank Microsoft(TM) for encouraging manufacturers to label their
products this way, so I know what to AVOID.

I stick to quality software:

Linux 2.0.30                        | IBM OS/2 Warp (TM) v4.0

 
 
 

old hardware and linux compatibility - help

Post by Bas Vermeul » Sat, 26 Jul 1997 04:00:00


: --
: Yours
:     Yitzhac Casapu
:        Phone/FaxModem: 972-4-8334527
:        41/12 Beth-Lehem St. Haifa, Israel; ZIP: 35567
:     Studying at the Technion - Israel institute of technology.
:        Faculty of Electrical Engineering
:        

: When I shop for hardware I always look for the "Designed for Windows 95" logo.
: I really thank Microsoft(TM) for encouraging manufacturers to label their
: products this way, so I know what to AVOID.

: I stick to quality software:

: Linux 2.0.30                        | IBM OS/2 Warp (TM) v4.0

Would you mind if I nick this sig? I just LOVE it... ;)

Bas vermeulen

 
 
 

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