any US Robotics x2 56k drivers?

any US Robotics x2 56k drivers?

Post by Ryan » Sun, 12 Oct 1997 04:00:00



 I am purchasing a new computer with a USR x2 56k modem. It is listed as a
modem for Windows. Does this mean there are no drivers available? has anyone
wriiten any? Thanks.

Ryan Rozich

 
 
 

any US Robotics x2 56k drivers?

Post by Mr. Caldwe » Mon, 13 Oct 1997 04:00:00



> I am purchasing a new computer with a USR x2 56k modem. It is listed as a
>modem for Windows. Does this mean there are no drivers available? has anyone
>wriiten any? Thanks.

Ack! Don't if it's a whinemodem, er winmodem!!

See the following:
http://www.teleport.com/~curt/modems.html#links

http://users.aimnet.com/~jnavas/modem/faq.html

If it's a winmodem or windows only modem it has NO brains, the computer does
all the work and eats cpu speed.

Since all the manufacturers have refused to disclose the direct hardware
specification and the cost of a winmodem compared to a real modem is not that
much it's not a good idea to get a winmodem. There are NO linux drivers for
winmodems at all.

Plus in almost every case they suck, even in windows.

>Ryan Rozich


_____________________________________________
Real mail address: jcaldwel at iquest dot net
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any US Robotics x2 56k drivers?

Post by Matt Kirsc » Thu, 16 Oct 1997 04:00:00


 >  I am purchasing a new computer with a USR x2 56k modem. It is listed
as a
 > modem for Windows. Does this mean there are no drivers available? has
anyone
 > wriiten any? Thanks.

Modems do not require drivers. If they do, they're not modems.
"Well, Windows 95 has modem drivers," you might reply. Technically,
they're not "drivers" in the case of serial modems. Instead, they're
more of a symbolic link, much like the /dev/modem symbolic link that
points to a serial port in Linux. It isn't there to add any sort of
support; all the support that's needed is in the serial port driver.
It's just there to simplify the setup of communications programs.

Ask if it is a "Sportster Winmodem". If it is, don't buy the system
unless they'll replace the modem with a "Sportster X2", and will
guarantee that you won't get a Winmodem IN WRITING. If they don't know,
find someone who does.

The main problem with Winmodems is that they do not have the normal
serial communications, modulation/demodulation, compression, or
error-correcting hardware that normal serial modems have. All those
functions are emulated by the Windows 95 driver in the system's main
CPU. The card is simply an analog-to-digital converter that plugs into
the phone line, taking the binary version of the audio data created by
the CPU and turning it into the warbles and squawks you hear when you
pick up a phone while a modem is in use. These "modems" were designed to
be disposable, no matter what US Robotics tries to tell you. When you
upgrade your OS to Windows 98, you throw out the Winmodem and buy a new
one designed specifically for Windows 98. They refuse to support any
other operating system, even Windows NT is unsupported, and will not
release the driver specifications under any circumstances. These modems
are junk, and should be avoided at all costs, or savings as the case may
be, because you can buy many brands of serial X2 or K56Flex modems for
less than US Robotics is charging for their "economically priced"
Winmodem...

 
 
 

any US Robotics x2 56k drivers?

Post by J Taylor PTT Europ » Sat, 18 Oct 1997 04:00:00




Quote:> Modems do not require drivers. If they do, they're not modems.
> "Well, Windows 95 has modem drivers," you might reply. Technically,
> they're not "drivers" in the case of serial modems. Instead, they're
> more of a symbolic link, much like the /dev/modem symbolic link that

they are a bit more than a symbolic link, they also configure the registry
settings such as connect strings, connect result codes, Voice features,
and so on. This information is critical for the end-user to seamlessly
connect at the rate supported by the modem.

Quote:> be, because you can buy many brands of serial X2 or K56Flex modems for
> less than US Robotics is charging for their "economically priced"
> Winmodem...

I agree: avoid these "software modems" like the plague. You really don't
want your communications taking up CPU time.
 
 
 

any US Robotics x2 56k drivers?

Post by Geoff Winkles » Tue, 21 Oct 1997 04:00:00



>"Well, Windows 95 has modem drivers," you might reply. Technically,
>they're not "drivers" in the case of serial modems. Instead, they're
>more of a symbolic link, much like the /dev/modem symbolic link that
>points to a serial port in Linux. It isn't there to add any sort of
>support; all the support that's needed is in the serial port driver.

This isn't strictly true - the modem inf files contain a few modem-specific
commands such as initialisation strings and other stuff.

Geoff