BackUPS vs. SmartUPS

BackUPS vs. SmartUPS

Post by Rob Kno » Fri, 30 Jan 2004 00:22:31



I want to get a UPS for several Linux systems.  I need to be able to use
signaling so that the machines will cleanly shut down in the event of a
power outing.  I will use apcupsd to do this.

I'm looking at both the BackUPS (USB versions-- the RS and the Pro) and
the SmartUPS from APC.  The SmartUPS seems to cost a factor of two more
than the BackUPS (for a given power rating), but from apcupsd I can't
tell what the difference is.

*Is* there any practical difference between the BackUPS and SmartUPS if
you're using apcupsd?  If so, what is it?

Thanks,

-Rob

--

     Help the EFF protect basic freedoms online: http://www.eff.org
 Playwrights & theatre types, see The Dramatic Exchange: http://www.dramex.org

 
 
 

BackUPS vs. SmartUPS

Post by Jonatha » Fri, 30 Jan 2004 00:57:59


In the old days, the BackUPS only gave simple signalling.  IIRC, it would
raise/lower one of the RS-232 serial signals to indicate power
failure/restoration.  That was all it was capable of.  I don't know what
they've added to the USB variants, however.

The SmartUPS models were more intelligent.  They would report things like
the input line voltage and temperature.  Plus you could signal the UPS to
shut off, do self-tests, and other things.  I'm using one of the older
serial SmartUPS models here at home and I really like it.

If you want to save some dough, find someone tossing out their UPSes and
snatch them up.  It seems that everyone forgets that lead-acid batteries
only last a few years.  So when the batteries go, they toss the whole UPS,
thinking its broken.  Grab the bad UPS, find yourself a battery store or a
burgler alarm supply store and replace the batteries.  Then, be a good
citizen and drop off the bad batteries at your city/county local recycling
drop-off so they don't end up in the landfills.
I got a small BackUPS 520 a few years ago that way; replacement batteries
cost me all of $22 at a hamfest.

good luck...


> I want to get a UPS for several Linux systems.  I need to be able to use
> signaling so that the machines will cleanly shut down in the event of a
> power outing.  I will use apcupsd to do this.

> I'm looking at both the BackUPS (USB versions-- the RS and the Pro) and
> the SmartUPS from APC.  The SmartUPS seems to cost a factor of two more
> than the BackUPS (for a given power rating), but from apcupsd I can't
> tell what the difference is.

> *Is* there any practical difference between the BackUPS and SmartUPS if
> you're using apcupsd?  If so, what is it?

> Thanks,

> -Rob

> --

>      Help the EFF protect basic freedoms online: http://www.eff.org
>  Playwrights & theatre types, see The Dramatic Exchange:

http://www.dramex.org

 
 
 

BackUPS vs. SmartUPS

Post by John-Paul Stewar » Fri, 30 Jan 2004 01:12:01



> I want to get a UPS for several Linux systems.  I need to be able to use
> signaling so that the machines will cleanly shut down in the event of a
> power outing.  I will use apcupsd to do this.

> I'm looking at both the BackUPS (USB versions-- the RS and the Pro) and
> the SmartUPS from APC.  The SmartUPS seems to cost a factor of two more
> than the BackUPS (for a given power rating), but from apcupsd I can't
> tell what the difference is.

> *Is* there any practical difference between the BackUPS and SmartUPS if
> you're using apcupsd?  If so, what is it?

Look at the detailed specs for the units as stated on APC's website.
There's some variation in estimated runtime (comparing BackUPS Pro 1000,
BackUPS RS 1000, and SmartUPS 1000), especially at half load.  There's
also some variation in surge supression specs.

But the main difference is the manageability and upgradability of the
SmartUPS line.  They have a "Smart Slot" for optional items such as
network (SNMP) management (instead of serial/USB), environmental
monitoring, and so on.  

IOW, with the SmartUPS line you have the option of upgrading to add
features which are important for use in a data centre whereas the
BackUPS line is targeted more at office use.

 
 
 

BackUPS vs. SmartUPS

Post by Ken Rya » Thu, 05 Feb 2004 00:17:26


The SmartUPS series also has a pure sine wave output, whereas the others
use a stepped approximation.  Most computer PSUs don't care, but some
will make noise (my old Sun Ultra 2 made a horrible buzzing sound on a
TrippLite UPS, but it worked).

One advantage of the SpartUPS is the ability to handle a broad range of
loads - for instance APC has an app note about using one for inductive
loads (motors, such as a sump pump).  Most UPSs will burn out with an
inductive load.

PS: I recommend hitting the APCUPSD website (www.apcupsd.com).  Not only
does the driver work well for me, but it has lots of useful information
(such as which UPSs advertised as simple-signalling really support a
subset of smart, which UPSs claim to be USB only but really also support
serial, schematics for most of the weird cables APC uses, etc.).

                Ken Ryan



>>I want to get a UPS for several Linux systems.  I need to be able to use
>>signaling so that the machines will cleanly shut down in the event of a
>>power outing.  I will use apcupsd to do this.

>>I'm looking at both the BackUPS (USB versions-- the RS and the Pro) and
>>the SmartUPS from APC.  The SmartUPS seems to cost a factor of two more
>>than the BackUPS (for a given power rating), but from apcupsd I can't
>>tell what the difference is.

>>*Is* there any practical difference between the BackUPS and SmartUPS if
>>you're using apcupsd?  If so, what is it?

> Look at the detailed specs for the units as stated on APC's website.
> There's some variation in estimated runtime (comparing BackUPS Pro 1000,
> BackUPS RS 1000, and SmartUPS 1000), especially at half load.  There's
> also some variation in surge supression specs.

> But the main difference is the manageability and upgradability of the
> SmartUPS line.  They have a "Smart Slot" for optional items such as
> network (SNMP) management (instead of serial/USB), environmental
> monitoring, and so on.  

> IOW, with the SmartUPS line you have the option of upgrading to add
> features which are important for use in a data centre whereas the
> BackUPS line is targeted more at office use.

 
 
 

1. Linux vs OS2 vs NT vs Win95 vs Multics vs PDP11 vs BSD geeks

        Every machine and operating system has got its useful
purpose...

        I see no point in argueing with people which OS is better, and
which is worse, and what will survive and what wont...

        The bottom line is obviously the best OS is the one that make
the end user most productive.    Ive used quite a variety of software
from intel, ibm, MS, sun, GNU, DEC/compaq, etc,   and everything OS
has got its UPz and DOWnz, so depending on what you want to do with it
yer machine, probably determines what OS you run.

        So lets cut to the chase -  OS bashing is a waste of time,
and most of the time I'd say the person putting it down just hasn't
seen that particular OS's potential,  or should I say speciality....

      Hell,  Plan 9 has even got some interesting features.. <snicker>

       And all PC users know,  that no matter what use on a day to day
basis on the PC, that one day you will need to boot good ole ancient
DOS to do something...

2. New hardware bug on Pentium systems?

3. Solstice Backup 4.2.6: Archiving vs. backup.

4. Salaries

5. Backup Solution for 4.2.1 and 4.3.x (Backup Express vs. Storix)

6. cgi script in Local Network

7. Enterprise Wide Backup - Epoch vs ArcServe vs Legato

8. I want to see a X-Windows session in some sort of Windows 2000 client

9. Archive times: cpio vs tar vs backup

10. Perfomance: tar vs ftp vs rsync vs cp vs ?

11. Slackware vs SuSE vs Debian vs Redhat vs ....

12. DOS vs. Windows vs. Mac vs. Unix vs. NS